Biography

Yossi Nehushtan holds degrees from Striks Law School (LLB), the Hebrew University (LLM) and Oxford University (BCL, MPhil, DPhil).

In the years 2000-2004 and 2007-2013 Yossi was a lecturer and senior lecturer at Striks Law School, Israel, where he taught Public Law; Jurisprudence; Law and Religion, Law and Racism, and Human Rights Law. He was also Chief-Editor of the Law School's Law Review and the head of the 'secular Judaism' programme at the Law School.

In 2006/7 Yossi held a lectureship post at Balliol College, Oxford, through which he taught Constitutional Law, Administrative Law, and Jurisprudence.

In 2013 Yossi held the HLA Hart Visiting Fellowship at the Oxford Centre for Ethics and Philosophy of Law (CEPL), University College, Oxford. During 2016-2019 he will be holding a Visiting Research Fellowship at the Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence, University of Trento, Italy.

Yossi joined the School of Law at Keele University in 2013. In Keele, Yossi is the Postgraduate Research Director, the General Editor of the Keele Law Review; and the 'Guest Speaker Seminar' Coordinator.

Research and scholarship

Yossi’s areas of research are legal theory, political theory, public law, human rights law, and law and religion.

Yossi is happy to supervise PhD students who wish to explore themes within these areas.A variety of PhD funding possibilities are available at Keele.

Teaching

Yossi contributes to the following modules:

  • Constitutional Law (UG)
  • Administrative Law (UG)
  • Jurisprudence (UG)
  • Foundations of Human Rights (PG)
  • Equality
  • Discrimination and Minorities (PG)
  • Healthcare, Justice and Society (PG)

Selected Academic Posts:

  1. ‘Ashers Baking (Part 1): The Supreme Court’s Betrayal of Liberalism and Equality’ UK Constitutional Law Association (2018, https://wp.me/p1cVqo-1BZ, with Stella Coyle).
  2. ‘Ashers Baking (Part 2): Do Homophobes and Racists have a Right Not to Manifest Liberal Messages?’ UK Constitutional Law Association (2018, https://wp.me/p1cVqo-1C2, with Stella Coyle).
  3. ‘Why there should not be Another Snap General (Brexit) Election’ ( 2018 British Politics and Policy – LSE; http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/snap-brexit-election/).
  4. Why there should not be a General Election “about the EU” – and why the UK isn’t a democracy’ (2016, British Politics and Policy - LSE) (http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/why-there-should-not-be-a-general-election-about-the-eu/).
  5. ‘Why Is It Illegal for the Prime Minister to Perceive the EU Referendum’s Result as Morally-Politically Authoritative?’ UK Constitutional Law Association (2016, http://wp.me/p1cVqo-1bS).
  6. ‘Why the EU Referendum’s Result is not Morally-Politically Binding’ UK Constitutional Law Association (2016, http://wp.me/p1cVqo-1aV). 

Selected Publications

  • Nehushtan Y. 2019. Conscientious objection and equality laws: Why the content of the conscience matters. LAW AND PHILOSOPHY, vol. 38(3), 227-266. link> doi> full text>
  • Nehushtan Y and Coyle S. 2019. The Difference between Illegitimate Conscience and Misguided Conscience: Equality Laws, Abortion Laws and Religious Symbols. In 'Conscientious Exemptions in a Liberal State: Theoretical, Doctrinal and Comparative Perspectives'. Adenitire J (Ed.). Hart.
  • Nehushtan Y and Danaher J. 2018. The Foundations of Conscientious Objection: Against Freedom and Autonomy. Jurisprudence, vol. 9(3), 541-565. doi> full text>
  • Nehushtan Y and Davidson M. 2018. Retrospective Rule Making and the Rule of Law: Between Fairness, Morality and Constitutionality. INDIAN JOURNAL OF CONSTITUTIONAL & ADMINISTRATIVE LAW, vol. 2, 27-43. full text>
  • Nehushtan Y. 2017. Civic Conscience, Selective Conscientious Objection and Lack of Choice. Ratio Juris, vol. 30(4), 433-450. doi> link> full text>

Full Publications List show

Books

  • Nehushtan Y. 2015. Intolerant Religion in a Tolerant-Liberal Democracy. Hart, Oxford, 2015.

Journal Articles

  • Nehushtan Y. 2019. Conscientious objection and equality laws: Why the content of the conscience matters. LAW AND PHILOSOPHY, vol. 38(3), 227-266. link> doi> full text>
  • Nehushtan Y and Danaher J. 2018. The Foundations of Conscientious Objection: Against Freedom and Autonomy. Jurisprudence, vol. 9(3), 541-565. doi> full text>
  • Nehushtan Y and Davidson M. 2018. Retrospective Rule Making and the Rule of Law: Between Fairness, Morality and Constitutionality. INDIAN JOURNAL OF CONSTITUTIONAL & ADMINISTRATIVE LAW, vol. 2, 27-43. full text>
  • Nehushtan Y. 2017. Civic Conscience, Selective Conscientious Objection and Lack of Choice. Ratio Juris, vol. 30(4), 433-450. doi> link> full text>
  • Nehushtan Y. 2017. The Non-Identical Twins in UK Public Law: Reasonableness and Proportionality. Israel Law Review, vol. 50(1), 69-86. doi> link> full text>
  • Nehushtan Y. 2016. The Case for a General Constitutional Right to be Granted Conscientious Exemption. Oxford Journal of Law and Religion, vol. 5(2), 230-254. doi> link> full text>
  • Nehushtan Y. 2016. Offensive Expressions: The Limits of Neutral Balancing Tests and the Need to Take Sides. Human Rights Law Review, vol. 16(1), 1-28. doi>
  • Nehushtan Y. 2015. Freedom of Expression in Time of War: The Case of Commercial-Political Advertisements. Human Rights, 4-30.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2015. The Case for Modest Constitutional Instrumentalism. Constitutional Commentary, vol. 30, 101-128.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2014. Jewish Circumcision as a Symptom of Collective Psychosis. Human Rights, 22-53.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2013. The Women of the Wall Case – The Need for a Moral-Liberal Resolution. Human Rights, 9-17.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2013. What Are Conscientious Exemptions Really About?. Oxford Journal of Law and Religion, vol. 2, 393-416. doi>
  • Nehushtan Y. 2012. Granting Conscientious Exemptions: The Need to Take Sides. Religion and Human Rights: an international journal, vol. 7(1), 31-58. doi>
  • Nehushtan Y and Levenkron N. 2012. The Future of Legal Aid Programmes in Israeli Law Schools. Hamishpat Law Review, vol. 17, 7-15.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2011. Religious Conscientious Exemptions. Law and Philosophy, vol. 30(2), 143-166. doi>
  • Nehushtan Y. 2011. The Links between Religion and Intolerance. Philosophy and Theology, vol. 23(1), 91-132.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2011. The Principle of Tolerance. Tel-Aviv University Law Review, vol. 34, 5-46.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2010. Finding the Ratio Decidendi in Cases of Plurality Decision. Israeli Bar Law Review, vol. 50, 631-649.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2010. The Use of the Presidential Pardon Power: Who Has the Last Say?. The Hebrew University Law Review – Online, vol. 2, 25-54.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2009. Female Segregation for Religious Justifications: The Unfortunate Israeli Case. Droit et Religions, vol. 4, 441-459.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2007. Free Expression and the Limits of Liberal Tolerance. Israel Law Review, vol. 40(1), 255-276.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2007. The Limits of Tolerance: A Substantive-Liberal Perspective. Ratio Juris, vol. 20(2), 230-257.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2001. Not Drafting the Yeshiva Students – A Tale of Judicial Review. Hamishpat Law Review, vol. 6, 183-205.
  • Nehushtan Y. 1999. Discrimination of Men in the Israeli Defence Forces. Hamishpat Law Review, vol. 4, 115-136.

Chapters

  • Nehushtan Y and Coyle S. 2019. The Difference between Illegitimate Conscience and Misguided Conscience: Equality Laws, Abortion Laws and Religious Symbols. In 'Conscientious Exemptions in a Liberal State: Theoretical, Doctrinal and Comparative Perspectives'. Adenitire J (Ed.). Hart.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2014. Selective Conscientious Objection: Philosophical and Conceptual Doubts in light of Israeli Case Law. In When Soldiers Say No: Selective Conscientious Objection in the Modern Military. Robinson P, Whetham D, Ellner A (Eds.). Routledge.
  • Nehushtan Y. 2008. Secular and Religious Conscientious Exemptions: Between Tolerance and Equality. In Law and Religion in Theoretical and Historical Context. Cane P, Evans C, Robinson Z (Eds.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.