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Food poverty projects delivers powerful performance

Dr Emma Surman of CASIC is part of a research project with colleagues at the Liverpool Management School (ULMS), Royal Holloway Management School and New Vic Borderlines to explore food poverty.  

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Food poverty projects delivers powerful performance

The project called Hungry for Change is funded by the Heseltine Foundation for Public Policy and Practice at the University of Liverpool

The research team have worked with staff, volunteers and users of existing community groups and social enterprises to share experiences and develop best practice across the two cities. The aim is to use the principles of cultural animation to communicate ideas and co-produce knowledge with communities so that the participants will set the agenda for learning based on their own needs and experiences.

The team from New Vic Borderlines, under the direction of Sue Moffat, used the research completed to date to develop a documentary drama. The debut performance was held at the New Vic Theatre, Newcastle-under-Lyme in front of an audience that included community groups, NGO’s, charities, policy makers and members of the public.  It was performed by community members and included the voices of research participants along with a dramatisation of the stories told.  In a debate afterwards members of the audience shared their own experiences and discussed how the issue of food poverty could be addressed in the future. The next performance of the show is at the Everyman Theatre in Liverpool at the end of June.


On The Town workshop

Keele’s Community Animation & Social Innovation Centre (CASIC) and the New Vic Theatre ran a workshop called THE EXCHANGE in York Place, Newcastle.

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On The Town workshop

The workshop brought locals and students together to exchange ideas, build relationships and create a ‘People’s Charter’ to introduce and welcome newcomers to the community.

 

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"Place, Purpose and Identity in Leadership Research and Practice"

On April 28th, Professor Brad Jackson, from Victoria University of Wellington gave an engaging semiar on "Place, Purpose and Identity in Leadership Research and Practice"

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"Place, Purpose and Identity in Leadership Research and Practice"

Place and Purpose are and have always been critical dimensions in the creation and the destruction of effective leadership but have, for a variety of reasons, not been a central preoccupation for leadership researchers and developers. Drawing on personal research and development encounters in Aotearoa New Zealand, I will highlight how place and purpose can animate communities and foster social innovation through a leadership-as-practice lens.

Brad Jackson is Professor of Public and Community Leadership at Victoria University of Wellington where he was the former Head of School of Government and Head of School of Management. At the University of Auckland Business School, Brad was Co-Director of the New Zealand Leadership Institute. He has published six books—Management Gurus and Management Fashions, The Hero Manager, Organisational Behaviour in New Zealand, A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book About Studying Leadership, Demystifying Business Celebrity and Revitalising Leadership and co-edited the Sage Handbook of Leadership and Major Works in Leadership. He is a former co-editor of the journal, Leadership, and the former Vice-Chair of the International Leadership Association. He serves on the boards of Akina Foundation which is charged with growing social enterprise in New Zealand and Toi Whakaari New Zealand Drama School.


Top French Business School researches CASIC’s social innovation practices

Professor Latchez Hristov from Audencia Business School - Nantes was awarded by his institution a grant to research the ethos and practices of the Community Animation and Social Innovation Centre-CASIC. 

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Top French Business School researches CASIC’s social innovation practices

The project lasting 12 months involves Professor Mihaela Kelemen as co-investigator and includes a series of visits and CASIC events at Keele and in Nantes.  Professor Hristov’s first visit to Keele was marked by a CASIC workshop on social innovation on March 14th which attracted over 50 participants.  Yiwen Lin, PhD student in KMS, and recipient of a Sasakawa foundation grant shared with the audience her first hand experiences of how communities in Minami-sanriku, Japan, socially innovated in their efforts of reconstruction after the 2011 Tsunami. The talk was followed by a cultural animation workshop led by Sue Moffat and her team from the New Vic Borderlines.   The students, academics and community members present at the workshop demonstrated their own practices of social innovation by identifying root causes and constructing collective solutions to crisis situations in the shape of poems, installations and performances.  Professor Hristov also interviewed CASIC academics and community members about their involvement in CASIC.  Here is one what Jayne Fair, the Treasurer for North Staffs Food Network and volunteer for a local group called FoodFest had to say about CASIC: “Over my time attending CASIC events I have seen how the idea of Cultural Animation has helped enlighten and enliven the local communities and how the work has gone on to have a lasting in pact on the life of North Staffordshire.  I’d like to tell you how important and beneficial I have found the input from Liz Riley and Emma Surman.  Without their tireless support and hard work the Food Network would not have progressed as far as it has”.


The case of Blue Tourism in Minami Sanriku

On March 14th, 2-4pm CASIC memeber Yiwen Lin gave a talk titled "The case of Blue Tourism in Minami Sanriku" which was followed by a community workshop.

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The case of Blue Tourism in Minami Sanriku

The cultural animation workshop invited the participants to explore themes emerging from the talk in a hands on, creative and participatory fashion. They built installations, made art and wrote haikus to express their feelings about the disaster and its aftermaths. The workshop was facilitated by award winning theatre director, Sue Moffat (New Vic Theatre).

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Music in the Community Workshop

Keele Music and Music Technology and Community Animation and Social Innovation Centre (CASIC)  organised a workshop held in the New Vic Theatre on 8 March 2017. The workshop was entitled ‘How Does the Hunger Sound Like’?  

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Music in the Community Workshop

The main organiser and host of the event was  Susan Moffat, Artistic Director of New Borderlines at the New Vic. The multi- and trans-disciplinary event involved a group of Music students  co-ordinated by Dr Fiorella Montero Diaz and Prof Miroslav Spasov. They were joined by another group of people from the local community and all walks of life. The co-creative community engagement workshop was intended to encourage  new relationships between academia and the community.  This was a very unsual and powerful experience  for our Music in the Community students to co-create with people from the community and through on-site arrangements to produce and perform music theatre works. The event will open a  lot of possibilities for future collaborations.

 

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A Bright future for Stoke on Trent interactive and workshop

Installation: 23rd November 2016 - 16th January 2017

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A Bright future for Stoke on Trent interactive and workshop

This CASIC installation was part of the 'Back to the drawing board' exhibition and ran from November 23rd until January 16th. The installation contained a projection of Peter Rice’s mural, Bridgewater artefacts, ordinary day to day objects, empty frames, voice overs and musical documentaries made by diverse communities which took part in previous CASIC research projects. Using Cultural Animation techniques of community engagement and knowledge co-production pioneered in the UK by Sue Moffat, Founding Director of New Vic Borderlines and developed further via the Connected Communities research, participants were encouraged to create and visualise a bright future for Stoke on Trent by filling empty frames with their own ideas and aspirations, drawing themselves in the projection, imagining conversations that will take place in the future, and writing haikus and cinquans about their aspirations, wishes and ambitions for Stoke on Trent. This living and interactive installation acted as a bridge between past, present and future and as a boundary object that can unite communities around ideas about the future.

On November, 23rd, a steady stream of community members, students and staff came to visit the CASIC installation and take part in interactive workshops.  Four theatre practitioners from the New Vic Boderlines encouraged participants to paint tea towels in the Pat Albeck's tradition, write haikus about their relationship with Stoke on Trent and put themselves in the projection of a mural by Peter Rice entitled 'A Bright Past for Stoke-on-Trent'. The discussions about Stoke and its impact on one's individual and collective identity have been fascinating. The created artifacts have been added to the installation and captured in picture and video form.

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CASIC Seminar on Knowledge Co-production with Children in Special Schools

 by Karian Schuitema -Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at Keele University 

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CASIC Seminar on Knowledge Co-production with Children in Special Schools

Abstract: This CASIC talk marks the beginning of a three year long research project that aims to understand how children with learning disabilities can be offered better opportunities to share their stories and express their personalities. The talk will introduce the issues surrounding the cultural participation of children who may have different needs in terms of communication and accessing creative activities. It will discuss how the project will invite children but also their parents, teaching staff and other relevant stakeholders and explain why their participation will be considered a fundamental and dynamic part of the research process. Finally the talk will focus on the reasons for using physical comedy performance in combination with Cultural Animation techniques to establish environments in which child and adult can contribute to this research outside their respective hierarchical positions. It will also outline the aim of adding a new focus to CASIC by initiating a network to support and connect academics with artist and the wider community to create inclusive opportunities for children and relevant stakeholders.


Bio: Karian Schuitema is a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at Keele University and is based at the Centre for Community Animation and Social Innovation. With a PhD on the subject of children’s theatre, she is an interdisciplinary researcher who specialises in art and theatre for the young as well as theoretical approaches to cultural representation and participation, children’s rights and education. She has founded the Children’s Theatre in the UK Research Network (available at: www.childrenstheatre.wordpress.com) and co-edited Theatre for Young Audiences: A critical handbook (Institute of Education Press, 2012). In addition to her academic research she has extensive experience of working with children and young people in positions such as play inclusion worker, Mencap nursery assistant and as a teaching assistant for children with special needs.


Co-productive approaches to policy

On Wednesday 7th September 2016, CASIC welcomed Dr Liz Richardson who presented a seminar with the title - Ten features of more co-productive approaches to policy

 

 

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Co-productive approaches to policy

Abstract: Traditional ways of designing policy are inadequate to cope with challenges of ever-increasing complexity. They also fail to satisfy calls for citizens to be seen as equal problem solvers on pressing issues of public policy. Drawing on ideas about power, Durose and Richardson explore how genuine democratic involvement in the policy process from those outside the elites of politics and technocracy can shape society for the better. Blending academic literature with grounded insights from practitioners, policy-makers, activists and actively engaged academics, a case is advanced for co-production as an alternative. The talk presents a framework and series of 10 guiding principles for more co-productive approaches to policy. They aim to take co-production beyond the ‘inspiring yet marginal’.

Durose, C. and Richardson, L. (2016) Designing public policy for coproduction, Bristol: The Policy Press

Bio: Liz Richardson is Senior Lecturer in Politics and Director of Undergraduate Studies for Politics at the University of Manchester. She is a Visiting Fellow in the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) at the London School of Economics. Her research interests include: civic participation; neighbourhood governance; local politics and local government; public services; and public policy. She has an interest in methodological innovation including field experiments, and other participatory research approaches. Her academic work has been published in journals such as the British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Social Science Quarterly, Parliamentary Affairs, and Policy and Politics. Her latest book, Designing public policy for coproduction, was published by Policy Press in 2016. Co-authored with Catherine Durose, the book integrates theory and vignettes from policy-makers and practitioners to argue for a fundamental re-design towards more citizen-centric public policy processes.


CASIC hosts event to develop sustainable food charter

On the 12th of July CASIC hosted a one day workshop to begin the process of developing a food charter for Stoke-on-Trent. 

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CASIC hosts event to develop sustainable food charter

A charter is key step in the cities desire to obtain accreditation as a sustainable food city. The event, which was held at the nearby New Vic Theatre, was organized by Dr Emma Surman in association with the North Staffordshire Community Food Network.

uring the morning, the audience of over 50 people comprising policy makers, charities, NGO’s, community groups and the public, heard from a range of speakers including: Tom Andrews of the Soil Association, Samantha Summerfield from the charity Farming and Countryside Education (FACE) Helen Millward, PhD student at Keele and Orsolya Kulcsar from the Civitas Foundation in Romania. Each speaker talked about their own work and the challenges and successes of various projects they had been involved in, with the aim of inspiring and challenging participants to think carefully about the future of food in the local area.

After listening to the speakers and taking full advantage of the opportunity to quiz them further and discuss the points raised, participants were led in a series of workshops by the New Vic’s Borderlines team. These workshops used the principles of cultural animation to develop the thoughts and principles to carry forward into developing a charter. The ideas produced during the workshop will be carried forward by CASIC, the North Staffordshire Community Food Network and Stoke-on-Trent public health department as they work together in developing a sustainable food agenda for Stoke-on-Trent.

 

 

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SEiSMiC National Workshop

 On April 12th 2016,  CASIC and the New Vic Theatre co-hosted a SEiSMiC National Workshop on ‘Improving the Engagement of Public Authorities with Community Organisations’.

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SEiSMiC National Workshop

The event attracted over 60 participants from the UK and Holland.   Academics, public authorities, funders and community partners explored how community organisations, and especially community enterprises, could  work more effectively with formal (public) authorities in accessing funding, in public procurement and in conducting research and delivering innovation.  After an introduction to CASIC by Professor Mihaela Kelemen, there was a panel discussion led by representatives from two community enterprises: Cordwainers Grow and Firesouls, The Heritage Lottery Fund West Midlands, Birmingham City Council and JPI Urban Europe.  The participants were then divided into three groups to debate 1) accessing public funding – grants and projects, 2) public procurement and 3) being involved in research and innovation projects.  The key issues identified in the morning were then animated via three experiential workshops led by theatre practitioners from the New Vic Borderlines. Participants created poems, installations and performances that were presented to the larger group. The event concluded with a presentation by Professor Kate Pahl from Sheffield University who synthesised the main communicative challenges in collaborating with multiple stakeholders and highlighted the potential of community animation techniques to surpass them, followed by a talk by Mike Coyne (SEiSMiC) who placed the findings of the workshop in a European context.

 

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Borderlines Workshop from Moonbrushed Media on Vimeo.


Keele Action Research Network - CASIC Joint Event

The Keele Action Research Network (KARN) teamed up with Community Animation & Social Innovation Centre (CASIC) in a half-day seminar and workshop on action research in diverse contexts.


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Keele Action Research Network - CASIC Joint Event

‌The event was chaired by Emee Estacio, pictured, and included presentations on research with children and young people (Jane Jervis), the use of participatory action research to develop an integrated educational programme to support users and carers in health care (Sue Read and Mike Dixon) and Photovoice with South Asian communities with diabetes (Bushra Bibi). Mihaela Kelemen and Rajmil Fischman also provided a fascinating demonstration on how digital technology can be used for cultural animation.


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'Because you're worth it?' New Vic Theatre - 21 October 2015

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'Because you're worth it?' New Vic Theatre - 21 October 2015


CASIC visits local primary school as part of science week

Dr Emma Surman and Liz Riley (CASIC/ Keele Management School) were recently invited to Belgrave St. Bartholomew's Academy in Stoke-on-Trent to teach the year five children.

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CASIC visits local primary school as part of science week

Emma was approached by the national charity Farming and Countryside Education (FACE) to be part of the school's science week, which this year focused on food.  Much of the week's activities had focused on food production but during this particular session the children were asked to think about food consumption and the social and cultural factors that influence this. Two year five classes took part and activities included reflections on the children's own food consumption practices and the creation of collages as means to discuss favourite meals. There was also a great deal of debate as part of an exercise to sort various food items into 'ordinary food', 'special food' and 'food I would never eat'.

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Yizkor - 25 January 2016

Marking United Nations Holocaust Memorial Day

Monday, 25 January, 2016 - 19:30 to 21:30

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Yizkor - 25 January 2016

This powerful drama-documentary is the story of teenagers Ariella and Moshe. It uses the actual words of young people who experienced the events leading to the Holocaust – from their diaries, letters and poems. A play for today, it provides powerful testimony to the effects of prejudice and discrimination. Developed with support from the Imperial War Museum and Val and Ibi Ginsburg, survivors of Auschwitz and Dachau concentration camps.

For booking information, follow the link www.newvictheatre.org.uk/productions/yizkor/


Responsible Innovation: avenues for academics and practitioners workshop

CASIC hosts Professor Latchezar Hristov from Audencia Business School, Nantes 

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Responsible Innovation: avenues for academics and practitioners workshop

On April 7th, 2016, CASIC hosted Professor Latchezar Hristov from Audencia Business School, Nantes who gave a talk about responsible innovation to a mixed audience that included both academics and community partners.  Professor Hristov outlined the economic and social context of innovation, providing insightful examples of technological and social innovations that have changed the world.  He stressed the need for organisations to embrace a more responsible approach to innovation that would ensure social benefits and a sustainability for future generations. The talk was followed by three cultural animation exercises run by theatre practitioners from New Vic Borderlines. Participants debated and enacted the meanings of responsible innovation, creating installations, poems and performances.  The event concludes with a collective reflection on the topic and suggestions for future events on social innovation. 

 

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CASIC Presentation - 20 May 2015

CASIC affiliate, Professor Monika Kostera (http://www.kostera.pl/) from Jagiellonian University, Cracow, currently Marie Curie visiting professor at Bradford University gives a seminar about alternative organisations in Poland and the UK, based on her ethnographic work.

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CASIC Presentation - 20 May 2015


Connected Communities Food Festival - 28 June 2015

The Food Festival was held in Middleport Potteries

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Connected Communities Food Festival - 28 June 2015


Connected Communities Festival - 25 June 2015

An immersive interactive workshop on 'Health in the Community' delivered on 25 June at Keele University.  The workshop was hosted by KAVE, School of Pharmacy, Keele University.

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Connected Communities Festival - 25 June 2015


Cultural Animation Workshop on Sustainability

Held on 19 March 2015 as part of Green Keele.

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Cultural Animation Workshop on Sustainability

 

 


International Summit , Keele Hall - 14-15 October 2015

CASIC International Launch Schedule

CASIC International Launch through Storify

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International Summit , Keele Hall - 14-15 October 2015


CASIC Exhibition - October 2015

CASIC Exhibition Schedule and videos

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CASIC Exhibition - October 2015


The Launch of CASIC

The Community Animation and Social Innovation Centre-CASIC was launched on March 16th in the presence of more than 60 participants from academia and the local community. Professor David Shepherd, the Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences welcomed the participants and gave a short overview of CASIC

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The Launch of CASIC