Criminology and Sociology 

(2018 Entry)

BA (Hons)

A degree in Criminology and Sociology enables you to explore a wide range of social issues and to consider the role of crime in societies past and present. Crime, deviance and social order are some of the most taxing issues our society faces.

Combined Honours

Combined Honours degrees allow you to study two different subjects in one degree. Find out more about Combined Honours degrees.


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International year
3 years/ 4 years with international year

UCAS code: LMH9

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Course Overview

Sociology and Criminology complement each other well in enabling students to understand broad issues revolving around social structure and social change, as well as the ways in which institutions, power systems, identity, culture and economics impact on crime and disorder. Sociology supports Criminology students by offering depth and background understanding. In many respects the history of Criminology is rooted in Sociology. As such, many of the ideas Criminologists use are sociological terms. For this reason, Sociology can help Criminology students to better understand concepts, analytical techniques, and social history. Criminology supports Sociology by offering a specific field for the application of sociological insights.

What will this mean for my future?

Many students who study this combination find their degree useful for careers in probation, social work, socio-legal work, the voluntary sector, and policing. Through your programme of study in Criminology you may be able to apply for opportunities to gain hands-on experience through volunteering in the community and/or work-experience with external agencies who work in criminal justice or resettlement. This range of opportunities will strengthen and diversify your skills, experience and your CV.

Indicative modules

First year

  • Understanding Crime
  • Criminal Justice: Process, Policy and Practice
  • Classical Sociology Punishment: Theory and Practice
  • Social Inequalities in the Contemporary World

Second year

  • Theoretical Perspectives in Criminology
  • Research Methods in Criminology or Sociology
  • Contemporary Social Theory

Third year

  • Dissertation in Sociology
  • Dissertation in Criminology
  • Criminology Work Placement
  • Gender and Consumption
  • Medical Sociology
  • Popular Culture and Crime
  • Drugs, High Crimes or Misdemeanours
  • Immigration, Crime and Social Control
  • Prisons and Imprisonment
  • Moving People: Migration, Emotion and Identity
  • Home: Belonging, Locality and Material Culture
  • The Virtual Revolution: New Technologies, Culture and Society

Course structure

Our degree courses are organised into modules. Each module is usually a self-contained unit of study and each is usually assessed separately with the award of credits on the basis of 1 credit = 10 hours of student effort.  An outline of the structure of the programme is provided in the tables below.

There are three types of module delivered as part of this programme. They are:

  • Compulsory modules – a module that you are required to study on this course;
  • Optional modules – these allow you some limited choice of what to study from a list of modules;
  • Elective modules – a free choice of modules that count towards the overall credit requirement but not the number of subject-related credits.

Modules Summary

Criminology A minimum of 90 subject credits (compulsory plus optional) required for each year across both of your Principal Subjects. This document has information about Criminology modules only; please also see the document for your other subject.

At Levels 4 and 5 you MUST take a minimum of 45 credits in Criminology achieved by taking two compulsory modules and one optional module. You must also take a minimum of 45 credits in your other principal subject.
Your remaining 30 credits may be selected from the list of Criminology optional modules, modules from your other principal subject, or from the range of elective modules provided by other disciplines.

 At level 6 you MUST take a minimum of 45 in credits in Criminology achieved by taking at least three optional modules. You must also take a minimum of 45 credits in your other principal subject. Your remaining 30 credits may be selected from the list of Criminology optional modules, modules from your other principal subject, or from the range of elective modules provided by other disciplines.

In year 3 there is the option to choose to specialise in one of your subjects, taking a minimum of 90 credits in this subject rather than taking modules from both subjects.

 

Sociology At Levels 4 and 5 you MUST take a minimum of 45 credits in Sociology achieved by taking two compulsory modules and one optional module. You must also take a minimum of 45 credits in your other principal subject.
Your remaining 30 credits may be selected from the list of Sociology optional modules, modules from your other principal subject, or from the range of elective modules provided by other disciplines.

 At level 6 you MUST take a minimum of 45 in credits in Sociology achieved by taking at least three optional modules. You must also take a minimum of 45 credits in your other principal subject. Your remaining 30 credits may be selected from the list of Sociology optional modules, modules from your other principal subject, or from the range of elective modules provided by other disciplines.

In year 3 there is the option to choose to specialise in one of your subjects, taking a minimum of 90 credits in this subject rather than taking modules from both subjects.

Modules - Year One

Year 1 (Level 4)

Compulsory modules

Credits

Optional modules

Credits

Understanding Crime

15

Psychology and Crime

15

Criminal Justice: Process, Policy, Practice

15

Murder

15

   

Investigating Crime: Criminological Perspectives

15

   

Punishment: Beyond the Popular Imagination

15

Social Inequalities in the Contemporary World

15

Mediated world

15

Classical Sociology

15

Investigating  Social Issues

15

 

 

The Anthropological Imagination

15

 

 

Researching British Society

15

Modules - Year Two

Year 2 (Level 5)

Compulsory modules

Credits

Optional modules

Credits

Crime and Justice in a Global Context

15

Mental Health and Offending

15

Research Methods in Criminology*

15

Working for Justice

15

   

Policing and the Police

15

   

Communities and Crime

15

Contemporary Social Theory

15

Sociology Work Placement

15

Research Methods*

15

Families and Households: Diversity and

Change

15

 

 

Health and Society

15

 

 

Social Movements

15

 

 

City, Culture, Society

15

 

 

Witchcraft, Zombies and Social Anxiety

15

 

 

‘Race’, Racism and Resistance

15

 

 

Cultures of Consumption

15

 

 

Globalisation and its Discontents

15

 

 

Producing Sociological Knowledge

15

 

* Students taking Criminology as one of their combined honours subjects must take the compulsory module in each semester. However, due to significant similarities between the year two Research Methods modules in Criminology and Sociology, students studying Criminology and Sociology must choose only one year two Research Methods module. This can be from either discipline but students are advised to consider this in connection with the ISP module they anticipate selecting in year three. Students should replace the other research methods module with an optional module from either discipline offered in the same semester.

 

* Students taking Sociology as one of their combined honours subjects must take the compulsory module in each semester. However, due to significant similarities between the year two Research Methods modules in Criminology, Education, and Sociology, students studying Sociology and Education or Sociology and Criminology must choose only one year two Research Methods module. This can be from either discipline but students are advised to consider this in connection with the ISP module they anticipate selecting in year three. Students should replace the other research methods module with an optional module from either discipline offered in the same semester.

 

 

 

Modules - Year Three

Year 3 (Level 6)

Optional modules  Criminology

Credits

Dissertation for Criminology

30

Popular Culture and Crime

15

Prisons and Imprisonment

15

Risk and Criminal Justice

15

Environmental Crimes

15

Drugs: High Crimes or Misdemeanours

15

Living with ‘Aliens’: Immigration, Crime and Social Control

15

Rehabilitation, Reintegration and Desistance from Crime

15

The Politics and Cultures of the Death Penalty in the 21st Century

15

Criminology Work Placement

30

Optional modules   Sociology

Credits

Dissertation

30

Home: Belonging, Locality and Material

Culture

15

Gender and Consumption

15

Moving People: Migration, Emotion, Identity

15

The Virtual Revolution: New Technologies, Culture and Society

15

Streets, Skyscrapers, Slums: The City in

Social, Cultural, and Historical Context

15

Sociology of Parenting and Early Childhood

15

Sex, Death, Desire: Psychoanalysis in Social Content

15

The Ecological Imagination: Environment and Society

15

Celebrity

15

Home: Belonging, Locality and Material

Culture

15

Gender and Consumption

15

 

Students may choose to study elective modules which are offered as part of other programmes in the School of Social Science and Public Policy, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and across the University. These include:

  • Modules in other subjects closely related to Criminology such as Sociology, Psychology, and Law.
  • Modules in other subjects in which they may have a particular interest such as English, History, Politics or International Relations.
  • Modules designed to help students for whom it is not their first language to improve their use of English for academic purposes.
  • Modern foreign languages modules at different levels in French, German, Spanish, Russian, Japanese and Chinese (Mandarin).
  • Freestanding modules in subjects of general interest including ethics, contemporary religions and the politics, society and culture of some of Britain’s European neighbours.
  • Freestanding modules related to the development of graduate attributes, student volunteering, and studying abroad as part of the University’s exchange programme.

More information about electives is available online: http://www.keele.ac.uk/electives/

Modules - Year Four

If you choose to specialise in Sociology in your final year you may study the following modules:

Compulsory modules

Credits

Optional modules

Credits

Dissertation

30

Home: Belonging, Locality and Material

Culture

15

   

Gender and Consumption

15

   

Moving People: Migration, Emotion, Identity

15

   

The Virtual Revolution: New Technologies,

Culture and Society

15

   

Streets, Skyscrapers, Slums: The City in

Social, Cultural, and Historical Context

15

   

Sociology of Parenting and Early Childhood

15

   

Sex, Death, Desire: Psychoanalysis in Social

Content

15

   

The Ecological Imagination: Environment and

Society

15

   

Celebrity

15

   

Home: Belonging, Locality and Material

Culture

15

   

Gender and Consumption

15

 

A selection of the optional modules listed will be offered annually for students in years two and three. Additionally, students are able to select up to two elective modules in each year of study. The elective modules can include modern foreign languages at different levels in French, German, Spanish, Russian, Italian, Japanese, and Chinese (Mandarin).

For further information on the content of modules currently offered, including the list of elective modules, please visit: www.keele.ac.uk/recordsandexams/az