Research

Chief Investigator: Professor Christian Mallen 
Principal Investigator: Dr Kaushalya Jayaweera (Institute for Research and Development, Sri Lanka)
Funder: Newton Fund
Year: 2017-2019
Study design:  Survey design and semi-structured interviews

Primary objective:

 

To explore the prevalence of common mental disorders, substance abuse and pain among adolescents in the Vavuniya district of Sri Lanka, and to capture the attitudes and beliefs of adolescents and adults towards mental health disorders. 
Chief Investigator: Professor Athula Sumathipala 
Principal Investigator:       Dr Tom Shepherd
Funder:  Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences
Duration: 2017-2019
Study design: Semi-structured interviews
Primary objective: To explore and understand illness perception models and illness-specific cognitions of patients with type 2 diabetes and whether patients with co-morbid depression have additional depression-specific cognitions.
Chief Investigator: Professor Christian Mallen 
Principal Investigator: Lasith Dissanayake 
Funder:     
Study duration: 2017-2018
Study design: Systematic review and semi-structured interviews 
Primary objective:  To explore the prevalence and experience of MSK pain in garment factory workers in Sri Lanka
Chief Investigator: Professor Richard Lilford (Univeristy of Warwick)
Co-applicant:          Professor Christian Mallen 
Funder:    National Institute for Health Research 
Year:       Awarded 2017
Study design:   
Primary objective:   
Chief Investigator: 

Dr Manuel Dayrit

Principal Investigator:

Professor Andrew Hassell

Funder:

Newton Fund 

Year:   

2017-2018

Study design:   

Systematic review and qualitative methodologies 

Primary objective:      

To develop a new postgraduate development training programme for primary care doctors

Research team:

Dr Manuel Dayrit (CI), Professor Andrew Hassell (PI), Dr Jeremie De Guzman, Dr Tom Shepherd, Professor Lisa Dikomitis, Dr Caroline Mae Ramirez, Dr Geminn Louis Apostol, Professor Christian Mallen

SOLACE is interdisciplinary research characterised by sustained and genuine engagement with local communities, dissolving knowledge hierarchies and co-producing innovative global public health initiative and clinical interventions.

Principal Investigator:

Professor Lisa Dikomitis 

Funder:

AHRC-MRC, the Global Challenges Research Fund

Year:

2017-2019

Study design:

Interdisciplinary approach, blending ethnography, Cultural Animation and participatory arts-based methods

Primary objective:

Establish a cross-cultural partnership which will identify public health challenges and solutions faced by those providing primary healthcare and those receiving it in rural, remote and underserved areas by raising awareness in multiple artistic and scientific platforms and ensure the delivery of innovative and educational interventions to improve the lives of those with non-communicable diseases in rural areas. 

Website:

www.solace-research.com

Chief Investigator:

Professor Athula Sumathipala

Principal Investigator:

Dr Nihal Abeysinghe, Institute for Research and Development Sri Lanka (www.ird.lk)

Funder:

Medical Research Council UK

Year:

2018-2019

Primary objective:

The aim is to establish a register of infant, child and adolescent twins, including mothers pregnant with twins, initially starting in Sri Lanka to provide the platform for future mental health research. Using this register we will be able to conduct research which will We will (1) expand existing research capacity-building activities on child and adolescent mental health and twin methods; (2), further consolidate existing partnerships; , (3)and establish new collaborations. The initiative is underpinned by three pillars: developing (1) high quality research, (2) ethics, and (3) patient and public involvement and engagement (PPIE). 

 Study design:

Establishing a child and adolescent twin register for mental health research, and capacity building in Sri Lanka and other low and middle-income countries in South Asia.

 

Chief Investigator:

Dr Jonathan Ives, Reader in Empirical Bioethics, Centre for Ethics in Medicine, University of Bristol

Principal Investigator:

Professor Athula Sumathipala

Funder:

The Wellcome Trust, UK

Year:

2018

Primary objective:

The aim of this project is to assess the attitudes towards biobanking among lay persons in Sri Lanka.

Study design:

A qualitative study

Chief Investigator:

Professor Athula Sumathipala

Principal Investigator:

Professor Fruhling Rijsdijk, Social Genetic and Development Psychiatry Centre, Kings College London

Funder:

Medical Research Council, UK

Year:

2019-2020

Study design:

Twin design

Primary objective:

The main objective of the study is to try to understand the mechanisms by which parental diet impacts child nutritional
choices and metabolic risk factors.

Chief Investigator:

Professor Dr Ravi Vaswani, Centre for Ethics, Yenepoya University, Mangalore, India

Principal Investigator:

Professor Athula Sumathipala

Funder:

The Wellcome Trust, UK

Year:

2019-2020

Study design:

A qualitative study

Primary objective:

To carry out a gap analysis of perceptions of researchers and lay public on use of stored samples and biobanking in India.

Chief Investigator:

Professor Bhisma Chakrabarti (Reading University)

Principal Investigators:

Professor Gillian Lancaster, Dr Gareth McCray (at Keele)

Funder:

MRC GCRF

Year:

2019-2024

Study design:

Observational study with field tests in two countries

Primary objective:

 

To develop a scalable mobile platform comprising assessment tools (INDIGO, DEEP, START) and physical measures such as eye tracking, EEG and others, to map the population distribution of scores in key neurodevelopmental domains relevant to mental health in 0-6 year old children in two diverse low-resource settings (India and Malawi).

Chief Investigator:

Dr Melissa Gladstone (Liverpool University)

Principal Investigators:

Professor Gillian Lancaster, Dr Gareth McCray (at Keele)

Funder:

MRC GCRF

Year:

2018-2019

Study design:

Observational study - field tests in three countries

Primary objective:

 

To develop an extended version of the Malawi Developmental Assessment Tool (MDAT), called INDIGO, by selecting and adding new items for early child development that best identify children with moderate to severe Neurodevelopmental Disorders (NDD) in the first 3 years of life, and field test their implementation when used at population level in three low to middle income countries (Uganda, Malawi, Pakistan).

Chief Investigator:

Dr Tarun Dua (World Health Organisation)

Principal Investigators:

Professor Gillian Lancaster, Dr Gareth McCray (at Keele)

Funder:

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Year:

2018-2020

Study design:

Observational study - field tests in multiple countries

Primary objective:

 

To develop the Global Scales of Early Development (GSED) by harmonising three tools of early child development (IYCD, CREDI, GCDG) for use at the population level in LMIC settings to address UN Sustainable Development Goal 4.2.1. To field test the scales in multiple countries (including India, Pakistan, Tanzania) around the world and create standard ‘norms’.

Chief Investigator:

Dr Tarun Dua (World Health Organisation)

Principal Investigators:

Professor Gillian Lancaster, Dr Gareth McCray (at Keele)

Funder:

Bernard van Leer Foundation & Grand Challenges, Canada

Year:

2014-2018

Study Design:

Observational study - field tests in three countries

Primary Objective:

 

To create the WHO indicators of Infant and Young Child Development (IYCD) tool for use in low and middle income countries in 0-3 year olds, by (i) Meta Data Synthesis - collation and secondary analysis of 14 datasets from 10 countries on 21083 children assessed with 7 developmental assessment tools to create the prototype tool, and (ii) Field Testing in Brazil, Pakistan and Malawi to pilot and finalise the tool.

Chief Investigator:

Professor Saeed Farooq (Keele University)

Principal Investigators:

Professor Zia ul Haq (Khyber Medical University)

Firaz Khan (Lady Reading Hospital)

Mukhtar-ul-Haq Lady Reading Hospital

Funder:

Medical Research Council UK, as part of their Global Alliance for Chronic Disease programme

Year:

2018-2021

Study design:

Cluster RCT

Primary objective:

 

Schizophrenia is ranked 13th for years lived with disability (YLDs) in the 15-49 years age group in developing countries. Despite this, around two third (69%) of patients in developing countries receive no treatment. This lack of treatment, commonly known as treatment gap arises from several factors including poor treatment adherence, lack of primary care involvement and poor access to the treatment. The evidence to implement community based interventions is severely lacking. We previously reported an intervention called Supervised Treatment in Out-Patients for Schizophrenia (STOPS) that led to significantly improved treatment adherence and functioning in a resource poor setting in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), Pakistan. We now aim to implement and evaluate scaled up version of STOPS, called STOPS+. The STOPS+ will consist of following components: treatment for schizophrenia based on WHO mhGAP guidelines, maintaining treatment adherence with the help of a trained family member for dispensing and administering medication to the patient assisted by regular text message reminders,  monitoring the availability of essential psychotropic medication and their side effects using a kit developed for this purpose and task shifting to PHC Physician and Multipurpose PHC Technician (MT) for treatment and monitoring. The PHC physicians and MTs will receive quality assured training and regular supervision with the help of digital technology platform. The research plan will involve a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods as well as health system data to measure both effectiveness and implementation of STOPS+ in three phase.

 1. Pre-implementation phase involving community engagement, qualitative study to guide modification of STOP to STOPS+ and the identification of potential study participants using case vignettes of a typical schizophrenia patient.

2. Implementation of STOPS+ in primary care settings using a cluster RCT design to determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness. 24 PHC centres in district Peshawar, KP will be randomised to STOPS+ or Enhanced Treatment As Usual (ETAU). We will recruit 526 patients (263 in each arm) suffering from Schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder based on the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 criteria. The outcomes will be: (i) primary clinical outcome – Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) (ii) primary process outcome – adherence to treatment regimen.

3. Evaluation of the implementation in real world setting will be measured using the standardised World Health Organization’s Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO-AIMS), economic evaluation, secondary data from the trial and utilisation of PHC, and in depth interview study involving all participants.

For further details see https://gtr.ukri.org/projects?ref=MR%2FS00243X%2F1

Principal Investigators:

Dr Tom Shepherd (Keele University)

Funder:

 

Year:

2018-2019

Study design:

Cross-sectional survey

Primary objective:

 

To examine the knowledge, attitudes and practice of GPs and practice nurses throughout the West Midlands regarding FGM/C

To test the utility of circulating an online survey via the CCG communications leads for research data collection.

Co-Principal Investigators: Professor Lisa Dikomitis and Dr Helen Price
Funder: NIHR
Year: 2019-2023
Study design: Interdisciplinary research, bringing together medical anthropology and parasitology and arts-based participatory approaches, developing stigma-reducing interventions
Primary objective: We will use a range of social science and participatory methods to gain in-depth understanding of patients, communities and healthcare professionals experiences and views on the effects of CL on the daily lives of those affected, the barriers to seeking healthcare, obtaining accurate, early diagnosis and receiving effective treatment. The insights we gain will inform the development of new interventions: community education campaigns to increase disease awareness and reduce stigma and training packages for healthcare professionals. The research will benefit patients and communities in Brazil, Ethiopia and Sri Lanka. We will robustly involve local communities throughout this project to help design study processes, oversee ECLIPSE activities, advise on easily understandable messages to publicise findings to a wide public. ECLIPSE will disseminate results widely through academic and policy networks and to the wider public via exhibitions, project website and audio-visual documentaries. Our research will inform policy development for better global management of CL.
Website: www.eclipse-community.com and @ECLIPSE_Keele