Welcome

Our mission is to deliver high quality multidisciplinary research designed to improve the content, delivery and configuration of primary care for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions, mental health problems and comorbidities.

Wellcome Trust studentships now available at Keele, Cambridge, Oxford and Southampton

Wellcome Trust studentships now available at Keele, Cambridge, Oxford and Southampton

Running Randomised Trials
20th to 23rd June 2017

Running Randomised Trials 20th to 23rd June 2017

A 4 day course will improve your knowledge and skills of RCTs.

PROGRESS Prognosis Course 2017

PROGRESS Prognosis Course 2017

Prognosis Research: Concepts, International Summer School 20-22 June 2017, Keele University

Musculoskeletal Matters

Musculoskeletal Matters

Keep up to date with the latest newsletters which aim to provide GPs, Primary Care Commissioners, and Patients etc informed about musculoskeletal problems in practice.

 

Dr Jo Protheroe appointed as Honorary Health Literacy Clinical Advisor

Posted on 16 March 2017 Dr Protheroe, GP and Senior Lecturer at the Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, has been appointed as an advocate for Health Literacy for NHS England, a role which aims to help raise the awareness and importance of Health Literacy in England.
 

Fellowship of the Faculty of Public Health

Posted on 09 March 2017 Professor Christian Mallen has been awarded Fellowship of the Faculty of Public Health through distinction, in recognition of his clinical and academic contribution to public health.
 

Readers in Rheumatology

Posted on 01 March 2017 Dr Sam Hider and Dr Ed Roddy have both been promoted to the position of Reader in Rheumatology in recognition of their contribution to clinical research within Primary Care.
 

Study reveals pre-eclampsia significantly increases risk of heart disease in later life

Posted on 21 February 2017 Research led by Keele University has demonstrated that women who suffered pre-eclampsia during pregnancy are four times more likely to have heart failure in later life.