Biography

Claire is a developmental cognitive neuroscientist, originally from California in the United States. Claire joined Keele University in August 2021 as a lecturer in Psychology. Prior to coming to Keele Claire was a postdoctoral scholar at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center from 2016-2021, where she held an NRSA postdoctoral fellowship from the United States National Institutes of Health. Claire completed her PhD in 2017 in developmental cognitive neuroscience at the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Research and scholarship

My research examines a simple but important question: how do early sensorimotor experiences guide social and cognitive development in infancy and childhood? I am interested in exploring the questions of how we come to understand and predict the actions they observe others perform, how this ability interfaces with emerging motor skills during infancy, and how sensorimotor experiences contribute to the development of other key cognitive abilities like attention, learning, and language. My hope is to contribute general understanding of cognitive development as well as knowledge that will directly benefit vulnerable children and families. My current research centers around the following main themes: (i) how early sensorimotor experiences guide perception and learning in typical development (ii) how atypical sensory experiences like hearing loss affects the development of general cognitive skills (iii) the real-world relevance of these early experiences for parent-child interactions and communication. To study these questions, I integrate several methodologies including head-mounted and traditional eye-tracking, neuroimaging (EEG), behavioural observation, and clinical intervention studies in both typical and atypical infant and adult populations.

Teaching

  • Module Leader PSY-20023 Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Module Leader PSY-40053 Advanced Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods
  • Module Team Member PSY-20012 Developmental and Social Psychology
  • Module Team Member PSY-30099 Key Readings in Cognitive Psychology

Selected Publications

  • Monroy C, Yu C, Houston D. 2022. Visual statistical learning in deaf and hearing infants and toddlers. Infancy, 720-735, vol. 27(4). link> doi> full text>
  • Monroy C, Domínguez-Martínez E, Taylor B, Marin OP, Parise E, Reid VM. 2021. Understanding the causes and consequences of variability in infant ERP editing practices. Dev Psychobiol, e22217, vol. 63(8). link> doi> full text>
  • Monroy C, Yu C, Houston D. 2021. Joint Action in Deaf and Hearing Toddlers: A Mobile Eye-Tracking Study. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 2794-2800). Cognitive Science Society. link> full text>
  • Monroy C, Chen C-H, Houston D, Yu C. 2021. Action prediction during real-time parent-infant interactions. Dev Sci, e13042, vol. 24(3). link> doi> full text>
  • Chen C-H, Monroy C, Houston DM, Yu C. 2020. Using head-mounted eye-trackers to study sensory-motor dynamics of coordinated attention. (vol. 254). link> doi>

Full Publications Listshow

Journal Articles

  • Monroy C, Yu C, Houston D. 2022. Visual statistical learning in deaf and hearing infants and toddlers. Infancy, 720-735, vol. 27(4). link> doi> full text>
  • Monroy C, Domínguez-Martínez E, Taylor B, Marin OP, Parise E, Reid VM. 2021. Understanding the causes and consequences of variability in infant ERP editing practices. Dev Psychobiol, e22217, vol. 63(8). link> doi> full text>
  • Monroy C, Chen C-H, Houston D, Yu C. 2021. Action prediction during real-time parent-infant interactions. Dev Sci, e13042, vol. 24(3). link> doi> full text>
  • Monroy C, Freeman J, Houston D. 2020. Does Being Born Deaf Affect How We See?. Frontiers for Young Minds, 1-6, vol. 8. doi> link> full text>
  • Monroy C. 2019. Hearing Loss Affects Infants’ Visual Processing and Cognitive Development. The Hearing Journal, 26, vol. 72(5). doi>
  • Monroy CD, Gerson SA, Domínguez-Martínez E, Kaduk K, Hunnius S, Reid V. 2019. Sensitivity to structure in action sequences: An infant event-related potential study. Neuropsychologia, 92-101, vol. 126. link> doi>
  • Monroy C, Shafto C, Castellanos I, Bergeson T, Houston D. 2019. Visual habituation in deaf and hearing infants. PLoS One, e0209265, vol. 14(2). link> doi>
  • Monroy CD, Meyer M, Schröer L, Gerson SA, Hunnius S. 2019. The infant motor system predicts actions based on visual statistical learning. Neuroimage, 947-954, vol. 185. link> doi>
  • Monroy CD, Gerson SA, Hunnius S. 2018. Translating visual information into action predictions: Statistical learning in action and nonaction contexts. Mem Cognit, 600-613, vol. 46(4). link> doi>
  • Monroy C, Gerson S, Hunnius S. 2017. Infants' Motor Proficiency and Statistical Learning for Actions. Front Psychol, 2174, vol. 8. link> doi> full text>
  • Monroy C, Meyer M, Gerson S, Hunnius S. 2017. Statistical learning in social action contexts. PLoS One, e0177261, vol. 12(5). link> doi>
  • Monroy CD, Gerson SA, Hunnius S. 2017. Toddlers' action prediction: Statistical learning of continuous action sequences. J Exp Child Psychol, 14-28, vol. 157. link> doi>

Chapters

  • Chen C-H, Monroy C, Houston DM, Yu C. 2020. Using head-mounted eye-trackers to study sensory-motor dynamics of coordinated attention. (vol. 254). link> doi>
  • Houston D, Chen CH, Monroy C, Castellanos I. 2020. How Early Auditory Experience Affects Children’s Ability to Learn Spoken Words. In The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies in Learning and Cognition.

Other

  • Monroy C, Yu C, Houston D. 2021. Joint Action in Deaf and Hearing Toddlers: A Mobile Eye-Tracking Study. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 2794-2800). Cognitive Science Society. link> full text>

Collaborations and grants awards

Grants: F32 Postdoctoral Fellowship, National Institutes of Health (2018-2021). Project Title: Action and interaction in infants with hearing loss, before and after cochlear implantation, grant number F32DC017076

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