£3.5 million boost for Regenerative Medicine research


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Posted on 01 April 2014
This is a fantastic success, which reflects Keele's genuinely internationally-leading research in regenerative medicine within our Research Institite for Science and Technology in Medicine.

Keele University is one of three partners in the Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Regenerative Medicine that has been awarded £3.5 million from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and the Medical Research Council (MRC) to further its research programmes in this globally important and fast-growing field of the healthcare industry.

Regenerative Medicine has huge potential to revolutionise the sector and transform patients’ lives. It covers a wide range of therapies designed to enable damaged, diseased or defective skin, bone and other tissue, and even perhaps organs, to work normally again.

The CDT in Regenerative Medicine brings together the complementary research skills at the institutions involved in the Centre, Loughborough University, Keele University and the University of Nottingham.

The funding will enable the Centre to increase the number of PhD students engaged in world-class research programmes that have been developed to address the major challenges in regenerative medicine.

Professor Mark Ormerod, Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research and Enterprise at Keele University, said: “This is a fantastic success, which reflects Keele's genuinely internationally-leading research in regenerative medicine within our Research Institite for Science and Technology in Medicine.  The partnership between Keele, Loughborough and Nottingham brings together three of the leading research centres in regenerative medicine, providing the breadth of world-class research to help tackle chronic illnesses such as heart disease and athritis that are becoming increasingly prevalent within our ageing population. The Centre will give students the knowledge and skills to become leaders in this rapidly emerging industry, translating research ideas into affordable, life-changing treatments.

The Bioengineering & Regenerative Medicine theme at Keele covers a complete spectrum from basic research into cell physiology and pathology, to developing new therapies in the laboratory, translating to treatments in the clinic and then assessing their efficacy by running clinical trials.  A theme that potentially leads to a large number of clinical applications is the investigation into the use of bioartificial organs and tissues for replacement surgery. Areas being investigated include the spinal cord, skin, intervertebral disc, tendon and ligament, in addition to bone and cartilage.”

Announcing the funding for the CDTs, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, The Rt Hon George Osborne MP, said: “A forward looking, modern industrial strategy is part of our long term economic plan to deliver security, jobs and growth to all parts of the UK. Our £500 million investment in Centres for Doctoral training will inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers, ensuring Britain leads the world in high-tech research and manufacturing.”


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