Professor Nicholas R Forsyth

Title: Institute Director, ISTM
Professor of Stem Cell Biology
Phone: +44 (0)1782 674388
Email: n.r.forsyth@keele.ac.uk
Location: Institute for Science & Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Guy Hilton Research Centre, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7QB United Kingdom
Role: ISTM Research theme: Regenerative Medicine

Contacting me: Please contact me through my PA:
Suzanne Murray
s.c.murray@keele.ac.uk
+44(0)1782 674087
Prof Nick Forsyth

2016-present:  Institute Director, ISTM

2016–present: Chair in Stem Cell Biology, ISTM

Current roles include:  

  • ISTM Executive Committee member (2014 - present)
  • ISTM Research Committee member (2012 – present)
  • Bioengineering and Regenerative Medicine – Research Theme Lead (2012 – present)
  • Cell Therapy Suite Director (2010 – present)
  • University Biological Safety Advisor (2007 – present)

Previous roles include:

  • Associate Director, ISTM (2014–2016)
  • Reader in Stem Cell Biology, ISTM (2013-2016)
  • Vice Chancellor Appointment Committee (2014-2015)
  • MSc Cell and Tissue Engineering - Course Director (2010-2014)
  • Human Tissue Officer (2006-2012)

2010 – 2013: Senior Lecturer in Stem Cell Biology, ISTM (HEFCE Funded)

2006 – 2009: Lecturer in Stem Cell Biology, ISTM (HEFCE Funded)

 

2013 – 2015: Guest Professor, Sichuan University

2013 – 2015: Guest Professor, Guangzhou University

 

2004 – 2006: Postdoctoral Fellow in the laboratory of Jim McWhir, Roslin Institute, Roslin, Midlothian, EH25 9PS. "Investigations into effects of physiologic culture condition on hESC differentiation, characteristics, and hESC progenitor isolation".

2000 – 2004: Postdoctoral Fellow within combined laboratory of Dept of Cell Biology, Professors Jerry Shay and Woodring Wright, UTSW Medical Center, Dallas, Tx, 75390-9039. "Telomere/telomerase directed laboratory has led to a comprehensive understanding of the many facets of telomere biology, regulation of the enzyme telomerase and a thorough expertise in the area of replicative senescence and reduced stress tissue culture models".

EDUCATION RECORD

1997 -2000: Ph.D Molecular Genetics,  The Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow, G61 1BD. "Genetic and Functional Evidence of a Mortality Factor on Chromosome 4cen – 4q22". Supervisor: Dr E. K. Parkinson.

1993 - 1997: BSc (Hons) Molecular Biology Upper Second Class, Glasgow University,Gilmorehill, Glasgow.      

 

 

ISTM Research theme: Regenerative Medicine

Research interests:

The research within our laboratory is focused on three primary inter-related areas; Basic Biology of Stem Cells; Cellular Response to Physiological Norms; and the Derivation of Clinically Useful Cell Types.

The field of stem cell biology has developed rapidly over the previous 10 years from first descriptions of pluripotent hESC to, more recently, reprogramming mortal somatic cells to pluripotency through the introduction and over-expression of selected genes. Great advances have also been made in the understanding and potential uses of adult derived stem cells.ISTM_forsyth_image_1_343x359  

In order to facilitate a greater understanding of cellular behavior in response to physiological norms we have begun the process of examining responses of stem cells to physiological levels of oxygen. In normal healthy tissue oxygen tension is substantially lower than atmospheric levels (21% O2 (147 mm Hg)). Alveoli display a partial pressure of ~110 mm Hg (~15% O2), arterial blood around 70 mm Hg (~10% O2), and venous blood around 35 mm Hg (~5% O2). Mean tissue oxygen tension is also around 35 mm Hg (5% O2). In many instances it is even lower e.g. brain, kidney, cartilage, fetal, and in many disease states chronically so e.g. infection and cancer.

We have established investigations into the responses of hESC to physiologically (ph) normal oxygen (ox) levels, as determined for pre-implantation blastocyst O2 exposure levels. These investigations revealed enhanced clonogenicity, reduced chromosomal aberration frequencies, a reduction in cell size and a reduction in cell complexity. These studies have complemented and enhanced similar research studies performed by other pioneering hESC groups. Microarray analysis has now established a ‘phox’ footprint across multiple hESC lines. Ontological analysis of the phox footprint has provided molecular clues to the previous phenotypic observations of reduced cell size and complexity. We are currently complementing this work through examination of hESC proteome response to phox. Future studies are intended to examine specific functions of phox upregulated growth factors, transcription factors, and metabolic agents. Complementary to the above description we are pursuing simultaneous examination of marrow stromal cells at both transcriptional and proteomic levels in phox conditions using our state-of-the-art in-house facilities.

 ISTM_forsyth_image_2a_288x261
 Figure 3 from Forsyth et al 2006. 2% O2 reduces cell size and complexity of hESC.  ISTM_forsyth_image_2b_288x261
 Figure 3 from Forsyth et al 2006. 2% O2 reduces cell size and complexity of hESC.  

Enhanced understanding of the basic biology of stem cells and the application of phynorm to routine cell culture provides the platform on which we wish to develop the derivation of clinically-useful cells types. It is clear from ongoing research and clinical application that autologous cell therapy is favoured at the clinician level while the allogeneic route is favoured commercially. We are exploring techniques and methodology to optimize the derivation of cell types related to musculoskeletal disorders. We have recently described the isolation of clonal progenitor cells from hESC-derived Embryoid Bodies. This work represents an important step forward in the realization of the safe application of hESC towards allogeneic cell therapy. The immortality of hESC engenders them well to longitudinal studies and simplifies scale-up of cell numbers. Marrow stromal cells are mortal and senesce after very few passages in culture. We are currently investigating the application of phynorm principles to these and other adult-derived cell types in an effort to enhance cell recovery and expansion while retaining safety.

ISTM_forsyth_image_3_240x330
Figure 5B from Forsyth et al 2008. Clonally derived progenitor cells from hESC-derived EBs.  

Figure 5B from Forsyth et al 2008. Clonally derived progenitor cells from hESC-derived EBs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborators:

Dr Richard Talbot, Lab Manager. ARK-Genomics, Roslin Institute, Edinburgh.

Prof Nicola Maffulli, Professor of Sports and Exercise Medicine at Barts & The London School of Medicine, Visiting Professor of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery at ISTM, Keele University.

Professor Monica Spiteri, Professor in Respiratory Medicine, Keele University, and Director of Lung Research Directorate of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of North Staffordshire.

 

Selected Publications

  • Dale TP, Mazher S, Webb WR, Zhou J, Maffulli N, Chen G-Q, El Haj AJ, Forsyth NR. 2017. Tenogenic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Tissue Eng Part A. link> doi>
  • Wright KT, McCarthy H, Forsyth N, Roberts S. 2017. 283 - Characteristics of human bone marrow mscs are sensitive to mononuclear cell separation technique and oxygen tension. Cytotherapy, vol. 19(5), S197. doi> link>
  • Wright KT, McCarthy H, Forsyth N, Roberts S. 2017. CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMAN BONE MARROW MSCS ARE SENSITIVE TO MONONUCLEAR CELL SEPARATION TECHNIQUE AND OXYGEN TENSION. CYTOTHERAPY (vol. 19, p. S119). link>
  • Stefan A, Kay AG, Forsyth NR, Kehoe O. 2016. Knockout of sdc-3 gene does not alter characterisation of bone marrow derived MSCs in vitro. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY (vol. 97, p. A15). link>
  • Kumar D, Lyness A, Gerges I, Lenardi C, Forsyth NR, Liu Y. 2016. Stem Cell Delivery With Polymer Hydrogel for Treatment of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: From 3D Culture to Design of the Delivery Device for Minimally Invasive Therapy. Cell Transplant, vol. 25(12), 2213-2220. link> doi>

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Dale TP, Mazher S, Webb WR, Zhou J, Maffulli N, Chen G-Q, El Haj AJ, Forsyth NR. 2017. Tenogenic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells. Tissue Eng Part A. link> doi>
  • Wright KT, McCarthy H, Forsyth N, Roberts S. 2017. 283 - Characteristics of human bone marrow mscs are sensitive to mononuclear cell separation technique and oxygen tension. Cytotherapy, vol. 19(5), S197. doi> link>
  • Kumar D, Lyness A, Gerges I, Lenardi C, Forsyth NR, Liu Y. 2016. Stem Cell Delivery With Polymer Hydrogel for Treatment of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: From 3D Culture to Design of the Delivery Device for Minimally Invasive Therapy. Cell Transplant, vol. 25(12), 2213-2220. link> doi>
  • Gerges I, Tamplenizza M, Rossi E, Tocchio A, Martello F, Recordati C, Kumar D, Forsyth NR, Liu Y, Lenardi C. 2016. A Tailor-Made Synthetic Polymer for Cell Encapsulation: Design Rationale, Synthesis, Chemical-Physics and Biological Characterizations. Macromolecular bioscience. doi>
  • Akram K, Patel N, Spiteri M, Forsyth NR. 2016. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, vol. 17(1), 128. doi>
  • Kumar D, Dale TP, Yang Y, Forsyth NR. 2015. Self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells on defined synthetic electrospun nanofibers. Biomed Mater, vol. 10(6), 065017. link> doi>
  • Dale TP, de Castro A, Kuiper NJ, Parkinson EK, Forsyth NR. 2015. Immortalisation with hTERT Impacts on Sulphated Glycosaminoglycan Secretion and Immunophenotype in a Variable and Cell Specific Manner. PloS one, vol. 10(7), e0133745. doi>
  • Patel N, Belcher J, Thorpe G, Forsyth NR, Spiteri MA. 2015. Measurement of C-reactive protein, procalcitonin and neutrophil elastase in saliva of COPD patients and healthy controls: correlation to self-reported wellbeing parameters. Respir Res, vol. 16, 62. link> doi>
  • Heathman TRJ, Webb WR, Han J, Dan Z, Chen GQ, Forsyth NR, El Haj AJ, Zhang ZR, Sun X. 2014. Controlled production of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) nanoparticles for targeted and sustained drug delivery. J Pharm Sci, vol. 103(8), 2498-2508. link> doi>
  • Dale TP, De Castro A, Parkinson EK, Kuiper NJ, Forsyth NR. 2014. Immortalisation with hTERT impacts on sulphated glycosaminoglycan secretion and chondrogenic potential in a variable and cell specific manner. JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE, vol. 8, 366. link>
  • Kumar D, Gerges I, Tamplenizza M, Lenardi C, Forsyth NR, Liu Y. 2014. Three-dimensional hypoxic culture of human mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in a photocurable, biodegradable polymer hydrogel: a potential injectable cellular product for nucleus pulposus regeneration. Acta Biomater, vol. 10(8), 3463-3474. link> doi>
  • Dunphy SE, Bratt JAJ, Akram KM, Forsyth NR, El Haj AJ. 2014. Hydrogels for lung tissue engineering: Biomechanical properties of thin collagen-elastin constructs. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater, vol. 38, 251-259. link> doi>
  • Dunphy SE, Bratt JAJ, Akram KM, Forsyth NR, El Haj AJ. 2014. Hydrogels for lung tissue engineering: Biomechanical properties of thin collagen-elastin constructs. JOURNAL OF THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS, vol. 38, 251-259. link> doi>
  • Sulé-Suso J, Forsyth NR, Untereiner V, Sockalingum GD. 2014. Vibrational spectroscopy in stem cell characterisation: is there a niche?. Trends Biotechnol, vol. 32(5), 254-262. link> doi>
  • Dong C-L, Webb WR, Peng Q, Tang JZ, Forsyth NR, Chen G-Q, El Haj AJ. 2015. Sustained PDGF-BB release from PHBHHx loaded nanoparticles in 3D hydrogel/stem cell model. J Biomed Mater Res A, vol. 103(1), 282-288. link> doi>
  • Akram KM, Lomas NJ, Forsyth NR, Spiteri MA. 2014. Alveolar epithelial cells in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis display upregulation of TRAIL, DR4 and DR5 expression with simultaneous preferential over-expression of pro-apoptotic marker p53. Int J Clin Exp Pathol, vol. 7(2), 552-564. link>
  • Pijanka JK, Stone N, Rutter AV, Forsyth N, Sockalingum GD, Yang Y, Sulé-Suso J. 2013. Identification of different subsets of lung cells using Raman microspectroscopy and whole cell nucleus isolation. Analyst, vol. 138(17), 5052-5058. link> doi>
  • Webb WR, Dale TP, Lomas AJ, Zeng G, Wimpenny I, El Haj AJ, Forsyth NR, Chen G-Q. 2013. The application of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) scaffolds for tendon repair in the rat model. Biomaterials, vol. 34(28), 6683-6694. link> doi>
  • Akram KM, Samad S, Spiteri MA, Forsyth NR. 2013. Mesenchymal stem cells promote alveolar epithelial cell wound repair in vitro through distinct migratory and paracrine mechanisms. Respir Res, vol. 14, 9. link> doi>
  • Lomas AJ, Webb WR, Han J, Chen G-Q, Sun X, Zhang Z, El Haj AJ, Forsyth NR. 2013. Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate)/collagen hybrid scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Tissue Eng Part C Methods, vol. 19(8), 577-585. link> doi>
  • Kumar D, Gupta S, Yang Y, Forsyth NR. 2013. αV β5 and CD44 are oxygen-regulated human embryonic stem cell attachment factors. Biomed Res Int, vol. 2013, 729281. link> doi>
  • Lomas AJ, Chen GG, El Haj AJ, Forsyth NR. 2012. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) supports adhesion and migration of mesenchymal stem cells and tenocytes. World J Stem Cells, vol. 4(9), 94-100. link> doi>
  • Forsyth N. 2012. Keynote: Experiences of leading a taught MSc in cell & tissue engineering. JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE, vol. 6, 416. link>
  • Lomas AJ, Chen GQ, El Haj AJ, Forsyth NR. 2012. Mechanostimulation of human mesenchymal stem cells in PHBHHx/collagen hybrid scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering applications. JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE, vol. 6, 46. link>
  • Kumar D, Roach P, Forsyth NR, Yang Y. 2012. Study of adsorbed proteins on nanofibrous substrates. JOURNAL OF TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE, vol. 6, 210. link>
  • Akram KM, Lomas NJ, Spiteri MA, Forsyth NR. 2013. Club cells inhibit alveolar epithelial wound repair via TRAIL-dependent apoptosis. Eur Respir J, vol. 41(3), 683-694. link> doi>
  • Akram KM, Samad S, Spiteri M, Forsyth NR. 2013. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and lung diseases. Adv Biochem Eng Biotechnol, vol. 130, 105-129. link> doi>
  • Shin E, Forsyth N, Fricker RA. Physiologic oxygen levels increase the differentiation and maturation of GABAergic neurons derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. Stem Cells Studies.
  • Zhang H, Kay A, Forsyth NR, Liu K-K, El Haj AJ. 2012. Gene expression of single human mesenchymal stem cell in response to fluid shear. J Tissue Eng, vol. 3(1), 2041731412451988. link> doi>
  • Oliva F, Gatti S, Porcellini G, Forsyth NR, Maffulli N. 2012. Growth factors and tendon healing. Med Sport Sci, vol. 57, 53-64. link> doi>
  • Lomas NJ, Watts KL, Akram KM, Forsyth NR, Spiteri MA. 2012. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: immunohistochemical analysis provides fresh insights into lung tissue remodelling with implications for novel prognostic markers. Int J Clin Exp Pathol, vol. 5(1), 58-71. link>
  • Gomes NMV, Ryder OA, Houck ML, Charter SJ, Walker W, Forsyth NR, Austad SN, Venditti C, Pagel M, Shay JW, Wright WE. 2011. Comparative biology of mammalian telomeres: hypotheses on ancestral states and the roles of telomeres in longevity determination. Aging Cell, vol. 10(5), 761-768. link> doi>
  • Kay A, Richardson J, Forsyth NR. 2011. Physiological normoxia and chondrogenic potential of chondrocytes. Front Biosci (Elite Ed), vol. 3, 1365-1374. link>
  • Pijanka JK, Kumar D, Dale T, Yousef I, Parkes G, Untereiner V, Yang Y, Dumas P, Collins D, Manfait M, Sockalingum GD, Forsyth NR, Sulé-Suso J. 2010. Vibrational spectroscopy differentiates between multipotent and pluripotent stem cells. Analyst, vol. 135(12), 3126-3132. link> doi>
  • Wimpenny I, Hampson K, Yang Y, Ashammakhi N, Forsyth NR. 2010. One-step recovery of marrow stromal cells on nanofibers. Tissue Eng Part C Methods, vol. 16(3), 503-509. link> doi>
  • Forsyth NR, Kay A, Hampson K, Downing A, Talbot R, McWhir J. 2008. Transcriptome alterations due to physiological normoxic (2% O2) culture of human embryonic stem cells. Regen Med, vol. 3(6), 817-833. link> doi>
  • Rahman R, Forsyth NR, Cui W. 2008. Telomeric 3'-overhang length is associated with the size of telomeres. Exp Gerontol, vol. 43(4), 258-265. link> doi>
  • Tremoleda FL, Forsyth NR, Khan NS, Wojtacha D, Christodoulou I, Tye BJ, Racey SN, Collishaw S, Sottile V, Thomson AJ, Simpson AHWR, Noble BS, Mcwhir J. 2008. Bone tissue formation from human embryonic stem cells in vivo. CLONING AND STEM CELLS, vol. 10(1), 119-131. link> doi>
  • Tremoleda JL, Forsyth NR, Khan NS, Wojtacha D, Christodoulou I, Tye BJ, Racey SN, Collishaw S, Sottile V, Thomson AJ, Simpson AHWR, Noble BS, McWhir J. 2008. Bone tissue formation from human embryonic stem cells in vivo. Cloning Stem Cells, vol. 10(1), 119-132. link> doi>
  • Forsyth NR and McWhir J. 2008. Human embryonic stem cell telomere length impacts directly on clonal progenitor isolation frequency. Rejuvenation Res, vol. 11(1), 5-17. link> doi>
  • Bullough R, Finnigan T, Kay A, Maffulli N, Forsyth NR. 2008. Tendon repair through stem cell intervention: cellular and molecular approaches. Disabil Rehabil, vol. 30(20-22), 1746-1751. link> doi>
  • Maida Y, Kyo S, Forsyth NR, Takakura M, Sakaguchi J, Mizumoto Y, Hashimoto M, Nakamura M, Nakao S, Inoue M. 2006. Distinct telomere length regulation in premalignant cervical and endometrial lesions: implications for the roles of telomeres in uterine carcinogenesis. J Pathol, vol. 210(2), 214-223. link> doi>
  • FORSYTH NR, Musio A, Simpson AHRW, Vezzoni P. 2006. Physiologic Oxygen Enhances Human Embryonic Stem Cell Clonal Recovery and Reduces Chromosomal Abnormalities. Cloning and Stem Cells, vol. 8(1), 16-23. doi>
  • Hewitt Z, Forsyth NR, Waterfall M, Wojtacha D, Thomson AJ, McWhir J. 2006. Fluorescence-activated single cell sorting of human embryonic stem cells. Cloning Stem Cells, vol. 8(3), 225-234. link> doi>
  • Forsyth NR, Elder FFB, Shay JW, Wright WE. 2005. Lagomorphs (rabbits, pikas and hares) do not use telomere-directed replicative aging in vitro. Mech Ageing Dev, vol. 126(6-7), 685-691. link> doi>
  • FORSYTH NR, Boman B, Damle S, Morales CP. 2004. Spontaneous Immortalization of Clinically Normal Colon-Derived Fibroblasts from a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Patient. Neoplasia, vol. 6(3), 258-265. doi>
  • Walter M, Forsyth NR, Wright WE, Shay JW, Roth MG. 2004. The establishment of telomerase-immortalized Tangier disease cell lines indicates the existence of an apolipoprotein A-I-inducible but ABCA1-independent cholesterol efflux pathway. J Biol Chem, vol. 279(20), 20866-20873. link> doi>
  • Forsyth NR, Morales CP, Damle S, Boman B, Wright WE, Kopelovich L, Shay JW. 2004. Spontaneous immortalization of clinically normal colon-derived fibroblasts from a familial adenomatous polyposis patient. Neoplasia, vol. 6(3), 258-265. link> doi>
  • FORSYTH NR, Evans AP, Shay JW, Wright WE. 2003. Developmental differences in the immortalization of lung fibroblasts by telomerase. Aging Cell, vol. 2(5), 235-243. doi>
  • Bryce SD, Morrison V, Craig NJ, Forsyth NR, Fitzsimmons SA, Ireland H, Cuthbert AP, Newbold RF, Parkinson EK. 2002. A mortality gene(s) for the human adenocarcinoma line HeLa maps to a 130-kb region of human chromosome 4q22-q23. Neoplasia, vol. 4(6), 544-550. link> doi>
  • FORSYTH NR, Craig NJ, Fitzsimmons SA, Morrison V. 2002. Functional evidence for a squamous cell carcinoma mortality gene(s) on human chromosome 4. Oncogene, vol. 21(33), 5135-5147. doi>
  • Forsyth NR, Wright WE, Shay JW. 2002. Telomerase and differentiation in multicellular organisms: turn it off, turn it on, and turn it off again. Differentiation, vol. 69(4-5), 188-197. link> doi>
  • Parkinson EK, Munro J, Steeghs K, Morrison V, Ireland H, Forsyth N, Fitzsimmons S, Bryce S. 2000. Replicative senescence as a barrier to human cancer. Biochem Soc Trans, vol. 28(2), 226-233. link> doi>
  • Bryce SD, Forsyth NR, Fitzsimmons SA, Clark LJ, Bertram MJ, Cuthbert AP, Newbold RF, Pereira-Smith OM, Parkinson EK. 1999. Genetic and functional analyses exclude mortality factor 4 (MORF4) as a keratinocyte senescence gene. Cancer Res, vol. 59(9), 2038-2040. link>
  • Kay AG, Dale TP, Akram KM, Mohan P, Hampson K, Maffulli N, Spiteri MA, El Haj AJ, Forsyth NR. 2015. BMP2 repression and optimized culture conditions promote human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell isolation. Regen Med, vol. 10(2), 109-125. link> doi>
  • Al Azzawi B, Merkhan MM, Kelly C, Forsyth N. 2016. Mesenchymal stem cell derived products attenuate cytokine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic beta cells. DIABETIC MEDICINE, vol. 33, 41. link>
  • Agrawal R, Dale TP, Al-Zubaidi MA, Benny Malgulwar P, Forsyth NR, Kulshreshtha R. 2016. Pluripotent and Multipotent Stem Cells Display Distinct Hypoxic miRNA Expression Profiles. PLoS One, vol. 11(10), e0164976. link> doi>

Other

  • Wright KT, McCarthy H, Forsyth N, Roberts S. 2017. CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMAN BONE MARROW MSCS ARE SENSITIVE TO MONONUCLEAR CELL SEPARATION TECHNIQUE AND OXYGEN TENSION. CYTOTHERAPY (vol. 19, p. S119). link>
  • Stefan A, Kay AG, Forsyth NR, Kehoe O. 2016. Knockout of sdc-3 gene does not alter characterisation of bone marrow derived MSCs in vitro. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY (vol. 97, p. A15). link>
  • Akram KM, Spiteri M, Forsyth NR. 2010. CLARA CELLS INHIBIT ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL WOUND REPAIR THROUGH A TRAIL-DEPENDENT APOPTOSIS MECHANISM. THORAX (vol. 65, pp. A62-A63). link> doi>
  • Tremoleda JL, Forsyth NR, Khan N, Wojtacha D, Christodoulou I, Tye BJ, Racey SN, Collishaw S, Sottile V, Thomson AJ, Simpson AHWR, Noble B, McWhir J. 2006. Bone tissue formation from human embryonic stem cells in vivo. JOURNAL OF BONE AND MINERAL RESEARCH (vol. 21, p. 1171). link>
  • Mohammad AZ, Suso JS, Forsyth N. 2015. Precision control of dissolved oxygen in mammalian cell culture media impacts on in situ volatile generation and promotes improved mesenchymal stem cell yield accompanied by reduced transcriptional variability. FREE RADICAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE (vol. 86, p. S16). link> doi>

M.Sc. Cell & Tissue Engineering (ISTM, Keele University).

Module Coordinator (Sept 2006 – present) – ‘Stem Cell Therapy’.

This course comprises 10 lectures covering all aspects of stem cells and their application to regenerative medicine. My duties include organizing course content, inviting speakers, delivering lectures, and developing practical assessments. Devise and mark exam.

Module Coordinator (Sept 2006 – present) – ‘Molecular Techniques’.

This course comprises a series of lectures covering all aspects of molecular techniques and their applications. My duties include organizing course content, inviting speakers, delivering lectures, and developing practical assessments. Devise and mark exam.

Problem-Based Learning Year 1 Tutor. (Keele University Medical School).

Research Funding:

Innovation Keele Development Fund

£25,000 March 2008 ‘Prototype Development Award’.

£25,000 March 2008 ‘Stem Cell Strategies for the Treatment of Pulmonary Fibrosis and Fibrotic Lung Disorders’. (Joint award with Professor Monica Spiteri).

American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society – Research Grant

£5,000 March 2008 ‘Can human bone marrow-derived stem cells differentiate into tendon-forming cells?’ (Joint award with Professor Nicola Maffulli).

British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society – Research Grant

£5,000 January 2008 ‘Can bone marrow derived stem cells differentiate into tendon forming cells?’

Royal Society – Conference Grant

£1,400 January 2008 - funded attendance at Keystone Hypoxia Symposium, Vancouver, Canada.

Keele University – Postdoctoral Scientist

£70,000 June 2007

Mercia Spinner Award – Prototype Development Award

£15,000 April 2007

Keele University – Phd Student

£80,000 November 2006

Genomia Fund – Research Grant

£32,000 May 2006.

Current Research Team Members:

Ms Tina Dale – EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Regenerative Medicine PhD student. 2011-present. “An exploration of cell suitability for articular cartilage repair and regeneration therapies”.

Dr Buthainah Al-Azzawi – Iraqi Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research PhD student. 2012-present. “The use of stem cell based therapies for the treatment of diabetes”.

Mr Marwan Merkhan - Iraqi Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research PhD student. 2012-present. “Immunomodulatory properties of the hMSCs secretome”.

Mr Mohammed Al-Zubaidi - Iraqi Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research PhD student. 2013-present. “Determination of headspace trace gases and their roles in stem cell biology”

Mr Rakad Al Jumaily - Iraqi Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research PhD student. 2014-present. “Molecular cytology of hypoxic cancer and stem cells; an epigenetic approach”

Mr Muhammad Ahmed - Iraqi Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research PhD student. 2014-present. “The effects of hypoxia mimetic agents on PC12 cell and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.”

Dr Andrei Stefan – co-supervision with Dr Oksana Kehoe.

Ms Shazia Mazher. Research Technican and Clean Room Support.

Visiting Project Students:

Mr Maximillian Wood. 3rd Year Keele Medical Student SSC. “Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of diabetes”.

Ms Sarika Premi. 3rd Year Keele Medical Student SSC. A characterization of the underlying mechanisms driving human mesenchymal stem cell-induced immunomodulation”.

Ms Megan Barrow. MSc Cell and Tissue Engineering. Tendon Tissue Engineering.

Ms Amalia Ruiz Serrano. MSc Cell and Tissue Engineering. Tendon Tissue Engineering.

Mr Omar Alhaidari.  3rd year medical student (IMSIU in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia). "Analysis of volatile organic compounds in the headspace of differentiated progeny of human induced pluripotent stem cells".