English Literature and Sociology 

(2018 Entry)

BA (Hons)

At Keele, studying a combined honours degree will include some modules from both of the single honours degrees. In this case, your programme will be made up of a combination of modules from both English Literature and Sociology.

Combined Honours

Combined Honours degrees allow you to study two different subjects in one degree. Find out more about Combined Honours degrees.


Study abroad
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International year
3 years/ 4 years with international year

UCAS code: LQ33

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Course Overview

In the English Literature element of the course, engage imaginatively with a wide range of contemporary and historical literature, focusing particularly on tradition, innovation, and diversity.

At Keele we know that English literature is literature written in English, and this can originate from many places: the United Kingdom, the USA, Canada, the Caribbean, Africa and Asia. So at Keele, you’ll explore the significance of texts within their originating cultures and historical periods and explore a range of approaches to literary study. You’ll consider the historical, sociopolitical, economic, gender and geographical contexts of fiction, poetry and drama from the medieval period to the present day. You might explore links between literature and film, or engage with exciting new genres such as the graphic novel. You’ll become an imaginative and critical thinker as you explore subjects such as the importance of story, the novel, writing for the screen, post-colonialism, depictions of maternity and scandal.

For the Sociology element of the course, we study societies, social issues and problems, and the ways in which they impact upon the lives of individuals. We are interested in how our lives are shaped by relationships with other people, institutions, habits, and ways of thinking that make up the complex societies in which we live. Our course will provide you with a grounding in the core concepts of Sociology, develop your skills in carrying out social research, and enable you to explore a range of important social issues. Our course covers topics such as social inequalities, culture, identity and belonging, families and households, health, religion and belief, the media, and crime and deviance. Beyond these topics, we are also concerned with the role of consumer culture in our lives; processes of globalisation; urban development; issues around environment and ecology; migration; and how social media influences our relationships and understanding of the world around us.

What will this mean for my future?

This part of the course will mean you’ll graduate with a wide range of skills – in research, oral and written communication, presentation – as well as excellent opportunities for the future. Some careers may require further study or training, but you might work as a teacher, journalist, editor, librarian, advertising copywriter, solicitor, arts administrator or writer. You could go into marketing, research, broadcasting, publishing, the compiling of dictionaries, or teaching English as a foreign language.

Studying Sociology will enable you to think independently, critically, and imaginatively about the issues that shape our everyday lives and our futures. We will encourage you to develop sociological explanations for the wide ranging changes taking place in the contemporary world and think about potential solutions to urgent social problems. Studying this course will encourage you to become an imaginative, creative, and pragmatic thinker who is able to think about problems critically with a view to working out practical solutions. This varied skill set is useful for a wide range of occupations and professions, including social care, the health sector, and advertising.

Course structure

Our degree courses are organised into modules. Each module is usually a self-contained unit of study and each is usually assessed separately with the award of credits on the basis of 1 credit = 10 hours of student effort.  An outline of the structure of the programme is provided in the tables below.

There are three types of module delivered as part of this programme. They are:

  • Compulsory modules – a module that you are required to study on this course;
  • Optional modules – these allow you some limited choice of what to study from a list of modules;
  • Elective modules – a free choice of modules that count towards the overall credit requirement but not the number of subject-related credits.

Modules Summary

Sociology -  A minimum of 90 subject credits (compulsory plus optional) required for each year across both of your Principal Subjects. This document has information about Sociology modules only; please also see the document for your other subject.

 

At Levels 4 and 5 you MUST take a minimum of 45 credits in Sociology achieved by taking two compulsory modules and one optional module. You must also take a minimum of 45 credits in your other principal subject.
Your remaining 30 credits may be selected from the list of Sociology optional modules, modules from your other principal subject, or from the range of elective modules provided by other disciplines.

 

At level 6 you MUST take a minimum of 45 in credits in Sociology achieved by taking at least three optional modules. You must also take a minimum of 45 credits in your other principal subject. Your remaining 30 credits may be selected from the list of Sociology optional modules, modules from your other principal subject, or from the range of elective modules provided by other disciplines.

 

In year 3 there is the option to choose to specialise in one of your subjects, taking a minimum of 90 credits in this subject rather than taking modules from both subjects.

 

Modules - Year One

Year 1 (Level 4)

English Literature Year 1 (Level 4)

In Year 1 (Level 4), Combined Honours students take one compulsory module in each semester, plus one optional module, giving a minimum total of 45 credits in English modules. Students can choose to take further modules, which can but need not include English Literature optional modules.

Compulsory modules

Credits

Optional modules

Credits

Reading Literature

15

Telling Tales

15

Composition

15

Starting Out: An Introduction to American Literature

15

   

New York, New York

15

   

Poetry through Practice

15

   

Playing Parts

15

   

Fiction through Practice

15

   

Transatlantic Gothic

15

 

Sociology Year 1 (Level 4)

Compulsory modules

Credits

Optional modules

Credits

Social Inequalities in the Contemporary World

15

Mediated world

15

Classical Sociology

15

Investigating  Social Issues

15

   

The Anthropological Imagination

15

   

Researching British Society

15

 

 

Modules - Year Two

Year 2 (Level 5)

English Literature Year 2 (Level 5)

In Year 2 (Level 5), Combined Honours students take a minimum of 45 credits in English Literature approved optional modules. Students can choose further modules, which can but need not include English Literature optional modules.

Optional modules

Credits

Romanticisms, 1780-1830

15

Writing Genre and Mode

15

Victorian Performances

15

Twentieth-Century British Fiction and Poetry

15

Revolution and Restoration

15

Medieval Literature

15

The Renaissance: Shakespeare and Beyond

15

Creative Writing: Poetry and Prose

15

 

Sociology Year 2 (Level 5)

Compulsory modules

Credits

Optional modules

Credits

Contemporary Social Theory

15

Sociology Work Placement

15

Research Methods*

15

Families and Households: Diversity and

Change

15

   

Health and Society

15

   

Social Movements

15

   

City, Culture, Society

15

   

Witchcraft, Zombies and Social Anxiety

15

   

‘Race’, Racism and Resistance

15

   

Cultures of Consumption

15

   

Globalisation and its Discontents

15

   

Producing Sociological Knowledge

15

 

* Students taking Sociology as one of their combined honours subjects must take the compulsory module in each semester. However, due to significant similarities between the year two Research Methods modules in Criminology, Education, and Sociology, students studying Sociology and Education or Sociology and Criminology must choose only one year two Research Methods module. This can be from either discipline but students are advised to consider this in connection with the ISP module they anticipate selecting in year three. Students should replace the other research methods module with an optional module from either discipline offered in the same semester.

 

Modules - Year Three

Year 3 (Level 6)

English Literature Year 3 (Level 6)

In Year 3 (Level 6), students take either the English Literature Dissertation module, Creative Writing portfolio (or the dissertation module in their other subject), studied in both semesters and worth 30 credits. Students can choose further modules, which can but need not include English Literature optional modules.

Optional  modules

Credits

Optional  modules

Credits

Dissertation in English Literature (ISP)

30

Film Noir

15

Creative Writing Portfolio (ISP)

30

Freedom and Death

15

Literature and Society

15

Wild Woods and Wide Worlds: British and American Children’s Fiction

15

Postcolonial and World Literature in English

15

Shakespearean Stages

15

Contemporary British Fiction

15

Writing at the Borders

15

Shakespeare on Film: Adaptation and Appropriation

15

 Modernist Manifestos and Magazines

15

Sex, Scandal and Society: Eighteenth- Century Writing

15

High Culture: Drink, Drugs, and the American Dream

15

The Alcohol Question

15

Words and Pictures: The Contemporary American Graphic Novel

15

Writingscapes

15

That womb where you imprison’d were: Pregnancy, Childbirth and Maternity in the Early Modern Period

15

Gender and Power in Restoration Literature

15

   

Postmodernism: Fiction, Film and Theory

15

   

The Canadian Metropolis

15

   

Modernist Manifestos and Magazines

15

   

 

Sociology Year 3 (Level 6)

Optional modules

Credits

Dissertation

30

Home: Belonging, Locality and Material

Culture

15

Gender and Consumption

15

Moving People: Migration, Emotion, Identity

15

The Virtual Revolution: New Technologies, Culture and Society

15

Streets, Skyscrapers, Slums: The City in

Social, Cultural, and Historical Context

15

Sociology of Parenting and Early Childhood

15

Sex, Death, Desire: Psychoanalysis in Social Content

15

The Ecological Imagination: Environment and Society

15

Celebrity

15

Home: Belonging, Locality and Material

Culture

15

Gender and Consumption

15

 

 

Modules - Year Four

If you choose to specialise in English Literature in your final year you will study the following modules:

Compulsory modules

Credits

Optional modules

Credits

Dissertation in English Literature

30

Creative Writing Portfolio

30

Literature and Society

15

Film Noir

15

   

Wild Woods and Wide Words: British and American Children’s Fiction

15

Optional modules

Credits

Words and Pictures

15

Lyric Poetry Writing at the Borders

15

The Canadian Metropolis

15

Gender and Power in Restoration Literature

15

High Culture: Drink, Drugs, and the American Dream

15

Postcolonial and World Literature in English

15

   

Contemporary British Fiction

15

Writingscapes

15

That womb where you imprison’d were: Pregnancy, Childbirth and Maternity in the Early Modern Period

15

   

Shakespeare on Film: Adaptation and Appropriation

15

   

The Alcohol Question

15

   

Shakespearean Stages

15

   

Sex, Scandal and Society: Eighteenth- Century Writing

15

   

Modernist Manifestos and Magazines

15

   

 

Students may choose to study elective modules which are offered as part of other programmes in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and across the University. These include:

  • Modules in other subjects closely related to English Literature such as American Studies, Film Studies or History.
  • Modules in other subjects in which they may have a particular interest such as Media, Culture and Creative Practice.
  • Modules designed to help students for whom it is not their first language to improve their use of English for Academic Purposes.
  • Modern foreign languages modules at different levels in French, German, Spanish, Russian, Japanese and Chinese (Mandarin).
  • Free standing modules related to the development of graduate attributes, student volunteering, and studying abroad as part of the University’s exchange programme.

 

 

If you choose to specialise in Sociology in your final year you may study the following modules:

Compulsory modules

Credits

Optional modules

Credits

Dissertation

30

Home: Belonging, Locality and Material

Culture

15

   

Gender and Consumption

15

   

Moving People: Migration, Emotion, Identity

15

   

The Virtual Revolution: New Technologies,

Culture and Society

15

   

Streets, Skyscrapers, Slums: The City in

Social, Cultural, and Historical Context

15

   

Sociology of Parenting and Early Childhood

15

   

Sex, Death, Desire: Psychoanalysis in Social

Content

15

   

The Ecological Imagination: Environment and

Society

15

   

Celebrity

15

   

Home: Belonging, Locality and Material

Culture

15

   

Gender and Consumption

15

 

A selection of the optional modules listed will be offered annually for students in years two and three. Additionally, students are able to select up to two elective modules in each year of study. The elective modules can include modern foreign languages at different levels in French, German, Spanish, Russian, Italian, Japanese, and Chinese (Mandarin).

For further information on the content of modules currently offered, including the list of elective modules, please visit: www.keele.ac.uk/recordsandexams/az