Ways to support them during their studies.

How you can continue supporting them - whether they are still living at home with you, or have moved away.

The start of term is always a busy and exciting time! We understand that their wellbeing will be one of your main concerns, particularly during the early stages when they are adjusting to their new environment. Please rest assured that our teams are here to help them to settle in, and throughout their time with us. 

If they are living on campus, it’s good to give them some space to allow them to settle into their new routine and make new friends. We suggest texting them in the first week, rather than phoning, so that they can answer when they are free. There are lots of activities and events on during Welcome and beyond - all these are in the Keele App (in the what’s on section) and this include virtual and in-person activities.

Student video chatting 300x200

Here are some of our frequently asked questions...

The answer to this is yes, absolutely! Many of our students are local and commute in as necessary for their course, and the current Coronavirus situation necessitates home study for many. 

We completely appreciate that making friends is a key part of the student journey, and enables new support groups and future lifelong relationships. There are lots of opportunities for everyone to get involved and make friends, whether they will be commuting onto campus or learning from a distance for now. As we have mentioned elsewhere on these web pages, we are running lots of virtual events and activities so that all new and returning students can get involved - just remind them to head to the Keele App (what's on) section for more. This SU-run Keele University Student Life (Official Group) 2020/21 is a good way for them to connect too. 

If they will be living at home with you throughout their studies, please encourage them to independently manage their own social and financial lifestyle as much as is possible. Of course, living at home provides financial benefits, and we have all become more familiar with working and studying from home recently for our own safety. 

Ask them! Due to data protection laws, we are not allowed to release any information about academic progress, attendance or anything else without the explicit consent of the student. University work can be challenging, and even the brightest, most hard-working students may struggle. If they tell you they are struggling academically or emotionally, try to find out why. Every undergraduate and taught postgraduate student at the University has a personal tutor. This member of staff supports the student’s personal and general academic development and provides a personalised point of contact with the University. 

We also have the Student Services Centre for all students who feel they need more support, and all services can be accessed online. 

All students who will be moving to Keele or the local area are encouraged to pre-register online with Keele Practice (health centre). The Practice is located on campus, allowing students easy access to a GP if and when needed. All students are asked to provide emergency contact information during their enrolment too. It is more important than ever that the personal address information your GP holds is up-to-date, as it is used as part of the NHS Test and Trace system for Coronavirus. 

It is normal for anyone moving away for the first time to feel homesick. Some students might find they don't keep in contact with family and previous friends as much as they might have thought they would. Some will be in contact daily, whilst others may go much longer without being in touch. Support them by encouraging them to get involved and to learn to be more independent. For example, there are diverse clubs and societies to join, and many volunteering opportunities too. Find out more at keelesu.com/activities. Some suggestions for how you can help them:

  • Try to reassure them that homesickness is quite normal, and that they are likely to feel better if they stay and work through it, rather than returning home at the first opportunity. Of course, each person is different, and you are often best placed to know how they are coping with the changes.
  • Try not to worry if you don't hear from them as much as you thought you would. You could agree a weekly point of contact, whether it's FaceTime, a text or a phone call, to reassure you that they are OK.
  • If they talk about coming home, try and encourage them to stay at Keele and arrange to visit them instead. To help to keep everyone safe from coronavirus, please note that visitors will not be allowed into campus accommodation for at least the first semester of the 2020/21 academic year, but family or friends can come onto campus to visit (they must not enter your accommodation).
  • Remind them of the support services available to them too – for example, all halls of residence have designated teams who can support them. If they are living at home, encourage them to get involved with campus life through societies, volunteering, or even part-time work.

Please try to discuss any concerns with them directly, and encourage them to access support from the University. If you have any serious concerns, please contact the Student Services Centre - we can make contact and help them to access further support provided by the University. Please note that we cannot provide specific details about your son/daughter without their explicit consent.

If you have any general questions about the support services available at Keele, then please contact our Student Services Centre:

T: +44(0)1782 734481

E: student.services@keele.ac.uk

UK students who plan to study at a university in the UK can apply for a student loan through the Student Loans Company. Student loans are made up of two parts: 

  1. Tuition fees – this is the money that you pay to a university to cover teaching costs and the cost of student services such as the library and student support. The tuition fee is paid directly to the university each term so the student cannot spend it by mistake!
  2. Maintenance loan – this is the money that the student can borrow to cover their living costs. Most of this will be spent on their accommodation if they are living away from home, but they will also need money to spend on food, transport, socialising and other day-to-day expenses.

This money is paid into the student bank account at the start of each term, typically in September, January and April. The maximum tuition fees are £9,250 per year for UK students to study in England. The maximum maintenance loan varies depending on whether the student is living at home or away and where they study (in London or elsewhere). The maintenance loan is based on your household income, which means you will need to provide information on your earnings from the previous tax year to support the student’s application (e.g. your P60 or benefits information) if they want to apply. 

There is also other government funding available for those in special circumstances, such as the Disabled Students' Allowance. 

Alongside the above, Keele awards financial scholarships and bursaries. Find out more about funding and support on these web pages

 

 

This money is paid into the student bank account at the start of each term, typically in September, January and April. As of September 2018, the maximum tuition fees are £9,250 per year to study in England. The maximum maintenance loan varies depending on whether the student is living at home or away and where they study (in London or elsewhere). The maintenance loan is based on your household income, which means you will need to provide information on your earnings from the previous tax year to support the student’s application (e.g. your P60 or benefits information) if they want to apply. 

 


Acronyms and terminology

And here's a quick table to familiarise you with some of the terms you might hear as part of academic life.

Acronym/term

What it means

Award

Undergraduate degree, Masters etc. (i.e. a qualification!)

CEC

Clinical Education Centre (Based at the hospital site – home of many of our clinical courses)

Credit

A numerical value attributed to the completion of a module, usually 1 credit = 10 learning hours. At Keele modules are normally multiples of 15 credits

ECs

Exceptional Circumstances - unforeseen issues which adversely affect a student’s academic performance

FY

Foundation Year

HEAR

Higher Education Achievement Report - a detailed transcript given to undergraduates when they leave

KLE

Keele Learning Environment – an online portal to various functions, incl. committee sites

Level

Shorthand for the level of study of a module or award, e.g. undergraduate, as defined in the FHEQ

Moderation

A quality checking process whereby a second marker ensures that marking standards are appropriate

PGR

Postgraduate Research

PGT

Postgraduate Taught

PhD

"Philosophiæ Doctor" - Doctor of Philosophy

Programme

Collection of modules leading to an award

SVR

Student Voice Representatives - elected reps for each programme and year

UG

Undergraduate