Dr Mwenda Kailemia

Title: Lecturer in Criminology
Phone: 01782 (7)34166
Email: m.l.w.kailemia@keele.ac.uk
Location: CBB1.010
Role: Programme Director for PGT Criminology
Criminology Programme Study Abroad Office
Contacting me: During Office Hours posted on my door or by email appointment.
Mwenda Kaelima

I read Politics and Philosophy at the University of Nairobi, graduating with a first class (Hon) degree. I thereafter graduated with a Master of Science in Research from the University of Edinburgh’s Graduate School of Social and Political Sciences. I thereafter obtained a PhD (Criminology) from Glasgow Caledonian University for a thesis on ‘Good-enough Policing:  Policing and Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Scotland’, examining the policing of sudden demographic changes in Scotland as a result of the enlargement of the EU post-2004. Before joining Keele University I taught criminology at Glasgow Caledonian University. My research interests are in transnational policing, and specifically how neoliberal globalization impacts policing needs across the world-how, as an ideology, neoliberalism has reconstituted global policy and practice on transnational and international crimes and justice. As an example, my recent research has examined the role of neoliberal globalization on the policies of the International Criminal Court (ICC), on the post-9/11 ‘war on terror’, and even on corporate environmental crimes. I welcome PhD supervision or research collaboration on projects close to these themes. 

In order to render the narrative of 'Scotland' as a welcoming Nation' a notion of Scotland's policing as distinct in history and materiality has been encouraged in recent discourse on race and ethnic diversity.  Here, a distinction is drawn, say, between the relative absence of publicised incidences of violent racism in Scotland and that in the recent history of England and Wales.  As my PhD on 'Policing and race and ethnic diversity in Scotland' (funded by the Scottish Institute for Policing and Research) shows, the dominance of this narrative has occluded a balanced examination of the interface of sudden changes in demographics and local policing needs.  Apropos of the migration of a large number of Eastern Europeans under the A8 framework (in 2004), my research interrogates what this change mean(t)s against the (somewhat) conflicting backgrounds of Scotland's devolution, The EU's accession conditionalities and the UK's 'no recourse to public funds' framework- and, interestingly, against the above-mentioned notion of Scotland as post-racial.  The ontological contradictions inherent in the present structure of Scotland's community policing, I argue, can only be overcome by 'good enough' policing- which was first outlined by Bowling (2007), following on from Loader and Walker's (2001) notion of 'satisficing policing' (that is, policing which is satisfactory and efficient against the street-level nuances of law and order):  For example the need to co-opt local young as the co-producers of local safety, rather than a nuisance to be legislated on or targeted by the widening apparatus of control.  Only 'Good enough policing' can also sustain the sense of community against rapidly changing demographics in which 'a few mattresses abandoned in the streets' is sufficient fuel for the dangerous othering in which the media have made reference to parts of Scotland as involving '21st race wars':  Although media anecdotes make reference to a unique migrant criminality which has overwhelmed police forces in the south of Glasgow, for example, 'good enough policing' approaches have been very effective against radicalization of young people, prevention of drug related crimes, hate crimes and so on.


This research therefore not only resuscitates the old question about whose side the police are on- and how such a stance can be maintained in times of rapid change- but also the lessons to be learned and the pitfalls to be avoided apropos specific methodolgies of crime prevention (for example, the unpopular 'stop-and-search').  Other motifs explored include;  the local policy context of transnational criminal networks, identity and crime and victimization;  the policing of hate crime and the policing of the use of urban space by young people.

Selected Publications

  • Kailemia MLW. 2017. Enter the dragon: the ecological disorganisation of Chinese capital in Africa. Third World Quarterly, 1-15. doi> link>
  • Kailemia MLW. ‘Tour de Psycho’: Sociopathy and doping in sports. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics.
  • Kailemia MLW. ‘Meum and Tuum’; cybercrime as the negative externality of post-politics bio-politics. Critical Criminology.
  • Kailemia MLW. 'Negative externality': The violence of capital and language. European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice.
  • Kailemia MLW. ‘Enter the Dragon’: The ecological disorganization of the Chinese Treadmill of Production in Africa. European Journal of Development Research.

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Kailemia MLW. 2017. Enter the dragon: the ecological disorganisation of Chinese capital in Africa. Third World Quarterly, 1-15. doi> link>
  • Kailemia MLW. ‘Tour de Psycho’: Sociopathy and doping in sports. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics.
  • Kailemia MLW. ‘Meum and Tuum’; cybercrime as the negative externality of post-politics bio-politics. Critical Criminology.
  • Kailemia MLW. 'Negative externality': The violence of capital and language. European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice.
  • Kailemia MLW. ‘Enter the Dragon’: The ecological disorganization of the Chinese Treadmill of Production in Africa. European Journal of Development Research.
  • Kailemia MLW. 2016. ‘Peeling Back the Mask’: Sociopathy and the Rhizomes of the EU Food Industry. European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice. doi>
  • Kailemia MLW. 2016. The Spectacle of Terrorism: Exploring the Impact of ‘Blind Acting Out’ and ‘Phatic Communication’. Journal of Terrorism Research, vol. 7(2), 91-102. doi>
  • Kailemia MLW. The non-existence of ‘Scotland’; Social disorganization, race and the policing of anti-social behaviour in Glasgow. Criminology and Criminal Justice.
  • Kailemia MLW. ‘How do you Say “Stop that!” in Slovakian?’: A8 Immigra-tion and Scotland’s Race and Ethnic Diversity Narrative. Sociologia, vol. 48(3), 247-266.
  • kailemia ML. 2016. International Justice in the time of ‘outsourced illiberalism’: Africa and the International Criminal Court. Journal of Global Faultlines, vol. 3(1), 16-28.

Other

  • Kailemia MLW. Negative externality’ and ‘corporate social responsibility’: Africa and the International Criminal Court.
  • Kailemia M and Janowski, D. Roma migration as forced migration; A case study of the role of EU’s Directive 2004/38/EC on the right of citizens, Budapest; European Roma Rights Centre.
  • Janowski and D. Roma migration as forced migration; A case study of the role of EU’s Directive 2004/38/EC on the right of citizens, Budapest; European Roma Rights Centre.
  • Kailemia MLW. The McGuffins of International Crimes’: The International Criminal Court and its powerful friends.
  • Kailemia MLW. When Santa was a Biker: Sociopathy and Doping in Sports.

I am the module leader for:

  1.  ‘Global Crimes and Justice’.
  2. Murder
  3. Policing and the Police
  4. Environmental Crimes

I also contribute to teaching on the following MA level Modules:

  1. Contemporary Criminology: Theory and Practice
  2. Researching crime and Criminal Justice
  3. Contemporary challenges in criminology and criminal justice
  4. Advanced topics in Criminology and criminal Justice.