Guy Woolnough

Title: Teaching Fellow
Phone: 01782 733546
Email: g.woolnough@keele.ac.uk
Location: CBB1.015
Role: Convener of Staff Student Liaison Committee
Contacting me: via email, or office hours, Monday 12-2pm

Guy was born in South London but has lived for many years in North Yorkshire. Guy first graduated from Bristol University, and completed a PGCE at Lancaster. His first career was in teaching, working in secondary schools in Lancaster and Carnforth, teaching History and Latin. Guy completed an MA in History at Lancaster in 2008, and gained his PhD at Keele in 2013. Guy was appointed as Teaching Fellow at Keele in September 2014.

My research has focussed upon the operations of the Victorian criminal justice system, particularly on the work of the ordinary policemen. I am interested the structuration of policing and in discretionary policing, especially insofar as it determined the way in which petty offenders such as drunks and vagrants were dealt with. Plebeian culture is an important element of my work, and much of my research has been based upon the Cumbrian experience.

Work in progress includes planned articles on:

The policing of Irish sectarianism in the migrant Irish communities of Victorian Cumbria.

‘Respectable’ Victorian offenders who engaged in white-collar offences including fraud and bigamy.

The use of ‘mugshots’ in the Victorian Criminal Justice system.

I plan for the future to explore the ‘civilising process’ as it was manifested (or not) in the petty sessions courts of Victorian Cumbria. I intend to explore the changing patterns in the prosecution of assault. My hypothesis is that there was a decline in the number of cases brought before the courts because fewer people were engaging in inter-personal violence; that the cases that came to court were increasing being prosecuted by the police, who assumed the role of professional arbiters in private rows. Petty Sessions charge books and police station Occurrence books are the primary sources that will allow an understanding of this issue.

Selected Publications

  • Woolnough G. 2016. Policing Brough Hill Fair, 1856-1910: Protecting Westmorland from Urban Criminals. In Rural–Urban Relationships in the Nineteenth Century: Uneasy neighbours?. Hammond M and Sloan B (Eds.). (12 vols.). Routledge. link>
  • Woolnough G. 2014. Blood Sports in Victorian Cumbria: Policing Cultural Change. Journal of Victorian Culture, vol. 19(3), 278-294. link> doi>
  • Woolnough G. A “respectable” convict? Challenging the idea of the criminal classes in mid­-Victorian England.
  • Woolnough G. A “respectable” convict? Challenging the idea of the criminal classes in mid­-Victorian England.
  • Woolnough G. Cock-fighting in Cumbria since 1850: contested popular culture. link>

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Woolnough G. 2014. Blood Sports in Victorian Cumbria: Policing Cultural Change. Journal of Victorian Culture, vol. 19(3), 278-294. link> doi>

Chapters

  • Woolnough G. 2016. Policing Brough Hill Fair, 1856-1910: Protecting Westmorland from Urban Criminals. In Rural–Urban Relationships in the Nineteenth Century: Uneasy neighbours?. Hammond M and Sloan B (Eds.). (12 vols.). Routledge. link>

Other

  • Woolnough G. A “respectable” convict? Challenging the idea of the criminal classes in mid­-Victorian England.
  • Woolnough G. A “respectable” convict? Challenging the idea of the criminal classes in mid­-Victorian England.
  • Woolnough G. Cock-fighting in Cumbria since 1850: contested popular culture. link>
  • Woolnough G. Cock-fighting in Cumbria since 1850: contested popular culture. link>
  • Woolnough G. Identity Concealed or Revealed? The use of photography in the Victorian criminal justice system. link>
  • Woolnough G. Identity Concealed or Revealed? The use of photography in the Victorian criminal justice system. link>
  • Woolnough G. Policing Drunkenness in Victorian Cumbria. link>

I am teaching both on undergraduate courses and on the Masters programme.

On the MA programme I have created and delivered sessions on structuration theory and on the policing of protest.

I am leading the 2nd year undergraduate module ‘Policing and the Police’

I am teaching on the 1st year modules:

  • Understanding Crime
  • Murder