Griffiths C.E. (Clare)

Title: Lecturer in Criminology
Phone: +44 (0) 1782 733597
Email: c.e.griffiths@keele.ac.uk
Location: CBB1.005
Role: UG Criminology Admissions Officer
Assessments& Extenuating Circumstances Officer Criminology
Contacting me: During office hours, posted on my door, or via email appointment
Clare Griffiths

Dr Clare Griffiths joined the criminology programme as a Teaching Fellow in 2010 before being appointed as a permanent lecturer in 2011. Prior to this Clare completed her BSc (Joint Honours), MA and PhD in criminology at Keele.

Clare’s research focuses on immigration and its consequences for crime and disorder in communities. After a period of mass migration to a small town in Cheshire, Clare’s PhD research explored both local established residents’, and new Polish migrants’, views and experiences of crime, disorder and inter-group conflict.

Clare’s research is particularly interested in dispelling some of the myths surrounding immigration and its impacts on crime and security in communities. It shows how ‘civilised relationships’ between newcomers and the established residents can exist in these changing neighbourhoods.

Other areas of research interest include fear of crime, quantitative research methods, community social control, and trust in the police.

Selected Publications

  • Griffiths CE. 2017. THE DISJUNCTURE BETWEEN CONFIDENCE AND COOPERATION: Police Contact amongst Polish Migrants and Established Residents. European Journal of Criminology. doi>
  • Griffiths C. CIVILISED COMMUNITIES: Reconsidering the 'Gloomy Tale' of Immigration and Social Order in a Changing Town. The British Journal of Criminology, vol. 54(6). doi> link>
  • Griffiths C. 2014. Researching 'Hidden Populations': Reflections of a Quantitative Researcher in Understanding 'Established' and 'Immigrant' Groups' Perceptions of Crime and Social (Dis)Order. In Reflexivity in criminological research: experiences with the powerful and the powerless. Lumsden K and Winter A (Eds.). (24 vols.). Palgrave Macmillan. doi>
  • Griffiths CE. 2014. Group Conflict and ‘Confined’ and ‘Collaborative’ Collective Efficacy: The Importance of a Normative Core between Immigrants and Natives in an English Town. Polish Sociological Review, vol. 185(1), 91-112.
  • Griffiths CE. 2013. Living with ‘Aliens’: Contrasting Public Perceptions and Experiences of Immigration at a ‘National’ and ‘Local’ Level. Criminal Justice Matters.

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Griffiths CE. 2017. THE DISJUNCTURE BETWEEN CONFIDENCE AND COOPERATION: Police Contact amongst Polish Migrants and Established Residents. European Journal of Criminology. doi>
  • Griffiths C. CIVILISED COMMUNITIES: Reconsidering the 'Gloomy Tale' of Immigration and Social Order in a Changing Town. The British Journal of Criminology, vol. 54(6). doi> link>
  • Griffiths CE. 2014. Group Conflict and ‘Confined’ and ‘Collaborative’ Collective Efficacy: The Importance of a Normative Core between Immigrants and Natives in an English Town. Polish Sociological Review, vol. 185(1), 91-112.
  • Griffiths CE. 2013. Living with ‘Aliens’: Contrasting Public Perceptions and Experiences of Immigration at a ‘National’ and ‘Local’ Level. Criminal Justice Matters.

Chapters

  • Griffiths C. 2014. Researching 'Hidden Populations': Reflections of a Quantitative Researcher in Understanding 'Established' and 'Immigrant' Groups' Perceptions of Crime and Social (Dis)Order. In Reflexivity in criminological research: experiences with the powerful and the powerless. Lumsden K and Winter A (Eds.). (24 vols.). Palgrave Macmillan. doi>

Clare has experience teaching on a range of modules at undergraduate level including,

  • Understanding Crime
  • Building Safer Communities
  • Research Methods
  • Policing and Security
  • Living with "Aliens": Immigration, Crime and Social Control

Clare has also taught at a postgraduate level on the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice and the MA in Ethics of Policing and Criminal Justice.

Clare also has experience supervising both undergraduate and postgraduate dissertations and is currently supervising two doctoral students studying 'education as an alternative to prosecution in traffic law' and 'crime, risk and trust in the tourism accommodation business'.