Andrew Henley

Title: Lecturer in Criminology
Phone: +44 (0) 1782 734143
Email: a.henley1@keele.ac.uk
Location: CBB1.008
Role: Programme Director (MA Criminology and Criminal Justice)
Criminology Social Media Co-ordinator
Contacting me: During office hours, posted on my door, or via email appointment

After studying for his MA in Social Sciences with the Open University, Andrew joined Keele University in September 2012 as a Graduate Teaching Assistant and doctoral student.  He was appointed as a Lecturer in Criminology in September 2015 and was awarded his doctorate in June 2017.

Andrew’s research interests are predominantly in the areas of punishment and social control.  In particular, he is interested in the impact of criminal records and post-sentence control measures on the life chances and social status of people with convictions.  He is currently exploring the extent of the so-called ‘collateral consequences’ of punishment both in the UK and European jurisdictions. 

Andrew’s doctoral thesis was a critical history of legal rehabilitation in England and Wales which focused on the conception, passage and contestation of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974.  He has also published work on the political discourse surrounding prisoner voting rights and on geographical variations in the control systems introduced to monitor those convicted of sexual crimes.

Selected Publications

  • Henley A. 2018. Civil and social death: Criminalisation and the loss of the self. In Loss, Dying and Bereavement in the Criminal Justice System. Read S, Santatzoglou S, Wrigley A (Eds.). (18 vols.). London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Henley A. 2017. Criminal records and conditional citizenship: towards a critical sociology of post-sentence discrimination. In Emerging Voices: Critical Social Research by European Group Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers. (26 vols.). European Group Press.
  • Hudson KJ and Henley A. 2015. Disparities in public protection measures against sexual offending in England and Wales: an example of preventative injustice?. Criminology and Criminal Justice. doi>
  • Hudson KJ, Taylor C, Henley A. 2014. Trends in the management of registered sexual offenders across England and Wales: a geographical approach to the study of sexual offending. Journal of Sexual Aggression, vol. 21(1), 56-70. doi>
  • Henley A. 2014. Abolishing the stigma of punishments served. Criminal Justice Matters, vol. 97(1), 22-23. doi>

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Hudson KJ and Henley A. 2015. Disparities in public protection measures against sexual offending in England and Wales: an example of preventative injustice?. Criminology and Criminal Justice. doi>
  • Hudson KJ, Taylor C, Henley A. 2014. Trends in the management of registered sexual offenders across England and Wales: a geographical approach to the study of sexual offending. Journal of Sexual Aggression, vol. 21(1), 56-70. doi>
  • Henley A. 2014. Abolishing the stigma of punishments served. Criminal Justice Matters, vol. 97(1), 22-23. doi>
  • Drake DH and Henley A. 2014. ‘Victims’ versus ‘offenders’ in British political discourse: The construction of a false dichotomy. The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice, vol. 53(2), 141-157. doi>

Chapters

  • Henley A. 2018. Civil and social death: Criminalisation and the loss of the self. In Loss, Dying and Bereavement in the Criminal Justice System. Read S, Santatzoglou S, Wrigley A (Eds.). (18 vols.). London: Taylor & Francis.
  • Henley A. 2017. Criminal records and conditional citizenship: towards a critical sociology of post-sentence discrimination. In Emerging Voices: Critical Social Research by European Group Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers. (26 vols.). European Group Press.

Andrew is the Programme Director for the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice and teaches on several of the modules for this course.  He also developed and leads the final year undergraduate module ‘Rehabilitation, reintegration and desistance from crime’. 

Andrew is currently co-supervising doctoral research on the long-term impacts of criminal convictions which were acquired in childhood. He welcomes enquiries from prospective PhD students interested in any topics linked to his research interests, but particularly criminal records and their social impact.