New study aims to explore sustainable metal chalcogenide anodes for high energy sodium-ion batteries.

A new research study on sustainable energy storage will be led by Dr. Nilanthy Balakrishnan and Dr. Juliana Morbec from School of Chemical and Physical Sciences. This research study received seed funding from the British Council supported Delivering a Sustainable Energy Transition for Pakistan project.

Pakistan has one of the lowest electrification rates (71%), and there has been severe energy shortfalls since 2006. Owing to the daily blackouts experienced, around 144 million people lack reliable access to the grid and most of the remote areas have not even been connected to the grid. Renewable energy resources like solar and wind technology could be the ultimate solution to address Pakistani’s prevailing energy crises. Energy storage devices, especially batteries, are indispensable units of the renewal energy technology for continuous provision of power specially in off-timings of solar and wind farms.

Sodium-ion batteries possess the potential of large-scale electric energy storage for both on-grid and off-grid renewable resources. In Pakistani’s context, domestic development of such storage devices may prove to be a game changer in sustainable energy future.

Metal chalcogenides, such as copper, aluminium, iron, zinc and sulphur are low cost and ample abundance in Pakistan. The research team aims to synergise theoretical and experimental studies in a quest for the discovery of a high performance, yet economical metal chalcogenide combination as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries.

Theoretical studies will be led by Dr. Morbec, which will serve as guidelines for the experimental team to focus on few suitable compositions. Dr. Balakrishnan’s experimental team will synthesis highly optimized two-dimensional metal chalcogenides and then sodium storage in sodium-ion batteries will be assessed. Hence, this collaborative project is expected to produce economical, sustainable, and high-performance metal chalcogenide anode materials for sodium-ion batteries.

"A new research study on sustainable energy storage will be led by Dr. Nilanthy Balakrishnan and Dr. Juliana Morbec from School of Chemical and Physical Sciences. This research study received seed funding from the British Council supported [[Delivering a Sustainable Energy Transition for Pakistan]][[see web link]] project.

Pakistan has one of the lowest electrification rates (71%), and there has been severe energy shortfalls since 2006. Owing to the daily blackouts experienced, around 144 million people lack reliable access to the grid and most of the remote areas have not even been connected to the grid. Renewable energy resources like solar and wind technology could be the ultimate solution to address Pakistani’s prevailing energy crises. Energy storage devices, especially batteries, are indispensable units of the renewal energy technology for continuous provision of power specially in off-timings of solar and wind farms.

Sodium-ion batteries possess the potential of large-scale electric energy storage for both on-grid and off-grid renewable resources. In Pakistani’s context, domestic development of such storage devices may prove to be a game changer in sustainable energy future.

Metal chalcogenides, such as copper, aluminium, iron, zinc and sulphur are low cost and ample abundance in Pakistan. The research team aims to synergise theoretical and experimental studies in a quest for the discovery of a high performance, yet economical metal chalcogenide combination as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries.

Theoretical studies will be led by Dr. Morbec, which will serve as guidelines for the experimental team to focus on few suitable compositions. Dr. Balakrishnan’s experimental team will synthesis highly optimized two-dimensional metal chalcogenides and then sodium storage in sodium-ion batteries will be assessed. Hence, this collaborative project is expected to produce economical, sustainable, and high-performance metal chalcogenide anode materials for sodium-ion batteries."

 


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