James Borg

Title: Teaching Fellow (Computing)
Phone: 01782 733415
Email: j.borg@keele.ac.uk
Location: CR122
Role:
Contacting me: My office hour this semester will 2:30-3:30 on Tuesdays. During Weeks 3-10 I will also be available 1-2 on Thursdays, but this will be by-mail appointment only.

I was employed as a Teaching Fellow at Keele University in 2009 following my successful completion of both a BSc in Artificial Intelligence and Computer Science, and MSc in Advanced Computer Science at the University of Birmingham. Alongside my teaching commitments I am also currently studying for PhD under the supervision of Dr. Alastair Channon  and Dr. Charles Day.

My main research interests fall into three categories:

  • Social and Cultural Evolution
  • Artificial Life
  • Adaptive Behaviour in Agent Based Models

The goal of my PhD research is to produce Artificial Life models of cultural evolution in grounded agent based simulations, resulting in adaptive social and cultural behaviour in artificial agents. I also hope to be in a position to comment on the necessary evolutionary pressures and evolved mechanisms that have led to social and cultural behaviour in the animal kingdom, becoming most apparent and complex in the human case.

My other research interests are evolutionary computation, neural networks, intelligent creative design, nature inspire design and optimization, and intelligence and learning. The interdisciplinary nature of my research has also led me to develop an interest in a number of fields from the social and natural sciences including neuroscience, cognitive science, philosophy, ethology, psychology, anthropology, and behavioural sciences.

I am currently a member of Keele's Computational Intelligence and Cognitive Science research group, and a student member of ISAL (International Society for Artificial Life).

Selected Publications

  • Jolley BP, Borg JM, Channon A. 2016. Analysis of Social Learning Strategies When Discovering and Maintaining Behaviours Inaccessible to Incremental Genetic Evolution. From Animals to Animats 14 (vol. 9825, pp. 293-304). link> doi>
  • Borg J and Channon AD. 2012. Testing the Variability Selection Hypothesis: The Adoption of Social Learning in Increasingly Variable Environments. MIT Press. doi>
  • Borg JM, Channon A, Day C. 2011. Discovering and maintaining behaviours inaccessible to incremental genetic evolution through transcription errors and cultural transmission. In T. Lenaerts, M. Giacobini, H. Bersini, P. Bourgine, M. Dorigo & R. Doursat (Eds.). Advances in Artificial Life, ECAL 2011: Proceedings of the Eleventh European Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (pp. 101-108). Heidelberg: MIT Press. doi>
  • Borg JM and Channon AD. Evolutionary Adaptation to Social Information Use without Learning. Springer.
  • Borg JM and Channon AD. The Effect of Social Information Use without Learning on the Evolution of Behaviour. Artificial Life.

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Borg JM and Channon AD. The Effect of Social Information Use without Learning on the Evolution of Behaviour. Artificial Life.

Other

  • Jolley BP, Borg JM, Channon A. 2016. Analysis of Social Learning Strategies When Discovering and Maintaining Behaviours Inaccessible to Incremental Genetic Evolution. From Animals to Animats 14 (vol. 9825, pp. 293-304). link> doi>
  • Borg J and Channon AD. 2012. Testing the Variability Selection Hypothesis: The Adoption of Social Learning in Increasingly Variable Environments. MIT Press. doi>
  • Borg JM, Channon A, Day C. 2011. Discovering and maintaining behaviours inaccessible to incremental genetic evolution through transcription errors and cultural transmission. In T. Lenaerts, M. Giacobini, H. Bersini, P. Bourgine, M. Dorigo & R. Doursat (Eds.). Advances in Artificial Life, ECAL 2011: Proceedings of the Eleventh European Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (pp. 101-108). Heidelberg: MIT Press. doi>
  • Borg JM and Channon AD. Evolutionary Adaptation to Social Information Use without Learning. Springer.
  •  CSC-10025 Cybercrime
  •  CSC-30013/14/17 Final Year Projects
  •  CSC‐40038 Collaborative Application Development