Keele University film festival to raise awareness of human trafficking


Street child

A scene from Victoria Terminus

Posted on 09 November 2010
"I want to let people know that by being aware and reporting any concerns, or even just by buying Fairtrade chocolate, they can make a fundamental difference to society."
Kelly Prince, event organiser

A film director is coming to Keele University as part of a festival raising awareness of human trafficking.

Director Gerard Vandervegt will present his film Victoria Terminus and discuss his work with Mumbai’s street children at the event in Keele’s chapel on Friday, November 12, at 12.30pm as part of the Unchosen film campaign.

The fly-on-the-wall documentary, a look at the real life experiences in the world of the Oscar-winning Slumdog Millionaire, was premiered in Bristol last Friday.

A second film, Understanding Trafficking, will be screened in the chapel on Tuesday, November 16, at 7pm. Directed by Ananya Chakraborti, this award-winning documentary follows young girls lured across borders into the sex trade in India and exploited by their own communities in return for a steady income. It will be accompanied by an interview with the director recorded especially for the screening at Keele.

The two films can currently only be seen in the UK as part of the Unchosen film campaign, which is also taking place in Bristol and Bath.

The screenings at Keele University are free public events and will include an original piece of music created by music technology students from Newcastle-under-Lyme College. There will be free goody bags and Fairtrade chocolate and coffee while stocks last, as well as exhibitions from Barnardo’s, Body Shop, Blue Blindfold, Citizens’ Advice Bureaux, Challenge North Staffs, The Co-operative, Fairtrade Stoke, Friends of the Earth and RATANAK.

The festival has been arranged by Keele University postgraduate student Kelly Prince, who is studying human trafficking. She said: “The injustice of human trafficking has had a profound effect on me. I want to let people know that by being aware and reporting any concerns, or even just by buying Fairtrade chocolate, they can make a fundamental difference to society.”