£3 million refurbishment completes stage one of Keele student accommodation project


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Posted on 07 October 2010
“I am delighted that the transformation of Holly Cross completes the first phase of a massive refurbishment programme for student halls of residence at Keele.”

Professor Nick Foskett
Vice-Chancellor

The latest stage in a major, multi-million pound project to refurbish the student halls of residence at Keele University has been completed a week ahead of schedule.

Designed to enhance the experience of students, the £3million refurbishment at Holly Cross has seen 238 bedrooms, 30 diners, 60 kitchens and one resident tutor flat completed seven days early.  Holly Cross is the last of the residential blocks to be given an overhaul, including an upgrade to mechanical and electrical systems, completing the 10-year, first phase of Keele’s plan to improve five halls of residence.

Keele University Vice-Chancellor, Professor Nick Foskett, said:  “I am delighted that the transformation of Holly Cross completes the first phase of a massive refurbishment programme for student halls of residence at Keele.  This first part of the programme has taken us 10 years to complete and has seen a huge investment by the University to enhance the experience of students at Keele.”

All the rooms had to be completed during the summer vacation and this was undertaken by Stoke-based builders Seddon Construction and construction management consultants Poole Dick Associates, working in collaboration with Keele University’s Estates team to deliver the project on time.
 
A disabled student and member of staff advised on improvements to facilities for those with mobility issues.

The work included:

• New energy saving lighting and electrical upgrades
• Decoration and new carpets
• Kitchen refit
• Energy efficient showers
• 4 ft beds with over bed lighting and additional storage

Other improvements included: larger notice boards; more kitchen storage space; cookers to replace combi-microwaves; more fridge and freezer space; large table for communal dining; a residential manager’s office within the hall and increased use of access control to reduce disturbance by non-residents.

Sue Underwood, Head of Accommodation Services, said: “The builders moved in the night the students moved out for the summer vacation and spent 14 weeks transforming the hall. The emphasis has been on improving the quality of student life, meeting the expectations of a changing market place and the needs of an increased international postgraduate group.  We listened to student feedback following refurbishment in another hall and have tried to respond to as many of these as possible.”