13th annual event

Keele Counselling (Research and Practice) Conference

Conference Theme: 'What's love got to do with it?' Families and intimate relationships.

Conference bookings: to book to attend the conference, please follow this link for the conference booking page.

Keynotes are scheduled as follows:

  • Saturday: Joanne Jackson and Phil Teasdale
  • Sunday: Lynne Gabriel and Phil Arthington

 

Conference Timetable 2019

Abstract Booklet - Counselling Conference 2019

Keynote speakers

Director, Counselling & Mental Health Clinic
York St John University
York, UK

Lynne is Professor of Counselling and Mental Health at York St John University and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Lynne is also a British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) Accredited and Registered Counsellor and Psychotherapist. She teaches across undergraduate and postgraduate courses and supervises research degree students.

Lynne is Founder and Director of York St John University’s public facing and revenue generating Counselling and Mental Health Clinic, leading on the provision of high quality psychological therapies and mental health services, alongside the innovation of research projects on interventions for adults, adolescents and children. The Clinic is currently engaged in research on domestic abuse and violence, bereavement, coaching for mental health and emotional-relational regulation.

Lynne is Professor of Counselling and Mental Health at York St John University and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Lynne is also a British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) Accredited and Registered Counsellor and Psychotherapist. She teaches across undergraduate and postgraduate courses and supervises research degree students.

Lynne is Founder and Director of York St John University’s public facing and revenue generating Counselling and Mental Health Clinic, leading on the provision of high quality psychological therapies and mental health services, alongside the innovation of research projects on interventions for adults, adolescents and children. The Clinic is currently engaged in research on domestic abuse and violence, bereavement, coaching for mental health and emotional-relational regulation.

Following establishment of the York Clinic, Lynne founded the UK Clinic Consortium, bringing together clinics in UK HEIs (York St John, Salford, Abertay, Newman university clinics) with the express aim of developing the knowledge base for the psychological therapies and extending research opportunities for staff, students and partners. Lynne is currently working with consortium members and a large partner organisation on the development of a national database for humanistic therapy.

Lynne is an experienced research supervisor, holds University Senior Supervisor status and has examined both traditional PhD students and taught Professional Doctorate candidates. Lynne Chairs the University’s Research Degrees Sub-Committee, which holds responsibility for research degree regulation, postgraduate researcher training, supervisor training and research student experience.

As a senior academic researcher and experienced professional practitioner Lynne has been invited to contribute to projects of significance for the UK psychological therapies. Recent examples include the ongoing development of the BACP Ethical Framework and its associated suite of good practice resources and the scoping of UK practitioner training standards and curricula for counsellors and psychotherapists.

Lynne was honoured with a BACP Fellowship for services to the profession and the field of psychological therapies. She served as the Association’s Chair (2008-2011), Immediate Past Chair (2012-2014) and now Emeritus Chair; continuing to provide professional and field leadership through Chairing BACP’s Good Practice Guidance Committee and through her work in a UK Expert Reference Group, SCopED.

Keynote Abstract:

Into the Breach: Navigating complex and close relationships

Lynne’s keynote will consider the complexities, joys, pitfalls and vagaries of navigating complex and close relationships.

Drawing upon years of experience in the mental health and therapy fields, Lynne will bring practice and research examples, alongside theoretical constructs, to her exposition of navigational skills for relational encounters. The vibrant dynamic of relational trust will be considered, alongside ways in which relating from a place of inclusivity and sensitivity to self and others can engender more rewarding relationships.

Successful and rewarding relationships need to be created and maintained over time, so how might we do this? Lynne will consider concepts, metaphors and aides for emotional and relational regulation.

Delegates will be engaged by Lynne’s anecdotes and vignettes, as well as by her conceptualisations and experiences of contemporary clinical and research practice.

 

Workshop Abstract:

NB: Lynne's keynote will be on Sunday, but this workshop will run on Saturday.

Inclusivity and sensitivity: identifying ways of working when family systems are stressed.
The workshop will explore potential ways of working with clients who are living and relating in complex relational/familial situations or 'systems'. We will consider the ethical and professional challenges and pitfalls of working with complexity, as well as explore creative ways to support people and groups to find mutuality and meaningful directions and futures

 

Keynote Abstract:

Picture of Phil Arthington

Love is known as a universal emotion. However, it is also a deceptively complex topic. Do we all feel love in the same way? What do we mean when we say ‘I love you?’ What happens when my way of showing love is different from yours?

Problems of love are a common issue faced by therapists. Within the mental health system, professionals’ focus on the individual can often obscure the importance of issues arising within loving relationships, meaning that a central aspect of the client’s experience can go unaddressed. In this presentation, I will discuss how a systemic perspective can make a useful contribution to understanding and working with problems of love. Systemic thinking asserts that relationships are central to understanding the human condition. Making a conceptual shift from the individual to the relationship has important ramifications for how we understand personal identity and how we can work therapeutically with loving relationships (including the therapeutic relationship).

I will draw on my clinical work in mental health settings, particularly working with families with babies in which problems of love can be particularly challenging. This talk will consider how our conceptions of love can act as a constraint and a resource in the therapy room.

Photo of Joanne Jackson 140x140 Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families
Social Worker/Family Therapist and Clin. Practice Tutor for CWP

Ms Joanne Jackson is currently employed as a Family Therapist at the Anna Freud Centre. She has worked in this capacity since 2000. Ms Jackson has over 25 years’ experience of assessing and working with families with very complex needs. She has worked in a statutory capacity as a Social Worker in child protection for 10 years.

She has acted as assessor and expert witness in the assessment of children’s emotional, behavioural, social functioning; parental capacity for change and relationships of families where there have been extreme discord and inadequate parenting that have impacted upon child development. Ms Jackson’s current work includes working with families with very serious and complex risks, parental alienation and contact disputes. Ms Jackson works privately at her own practice – Open Doors Therapy – where she undertakes individual and family therapy work. Ms Jackson works with whole family systems using systemic ideas and practice that enables family members to interact with their own dominant ideologies or discourses about what family life should be like. The main focus of this work is enabling understanding to emerge through the process of making sense of behaviour as a relational communication pattern that gets played out through interrelational interactions. Ms Jackson is also employed as an academic tutor where she teaches students and professionals in the mental health field since 2005. Her area of expertise are Parent-infant work, Attachment based mother and infant groups and working with parents with high conflict.

Keynote Abstract:

An Introduction to Family Therapy

This keynote will give an introduction to some of the basic family therapy and systemic practice concepts. The speaker will give an overview of the core conceptual framework and demonstrate some of these through the illustration of clinical practice examples.

Workshop Abstract:

A conversation about diversity

The workshop will focus on having a conversation with participants on diversity and the different social GRRAACCEESS taken into consideration when working systemically. Please note that this will be an experiential workshop that expects the participants to partake by thinking about their own cultural beliefs and practices and share in the group. The aim of the workshop is to re-invoke awareness of cultural and social differences.

Author of 'Inside Adoption; a parent's story', PCCS Books.

Inside Adoption is written by someone who has both worked within the adoption industry and is an adoptive parent himself. Philip Teasdale and his wife, Anne, adopted Jemma when she was a very young child. He describes here the difficult, traumatising years that followed as they struggled to create a loving home around her and the failure by the statutory services to support for the family and provide psychological help to enable Jemma to manage her personal demons and impulses. Teasdale brings to this first-person account an insightful understanding of the effects of early childhood trauma and a powerful critique of the adoption process. There is, he argues, still too little funding going into supporting adoptive families; parents are still left to sink or swim as best they can and the voices of adoptive parents are often absent from the debate about the future of the adoption services.

Adoption has changed hugely in the past few decades. These days, most children placed with adoptive families are not babies; by the time they meet their new parents they may have been exposed to a range of traumatic experience - in utero, within their birth families and within the state care system. Exposure to drugs or alcohol in the womb and abuse in early childhood are increasingly known to have significant effects on a child's psychological and relational development. The effects can endure throughout the whole of their life, regardless of the loving care and stability they receive in their adoptive home. This poses very real challenges for people stepping forward into the role of adoptive parent.

Keynote abstract: Adoption: is love enough?

Phil adopted in the 1990s and it changed his life. He will talk about his own experiences as an adoptive dad and explore some of the ways his relationship developed and is maintained with his daughter. He will use his personal and professional experiences to consider some key questions about the nature of adoption, the relationships that accompany it, and what love has to do with it.

Adoption is full of dilemmas, paradoxes and emotional complexity. Trauma features greatly in many adoptive families and adoption is often very different to the perceptions of it held by society. Phil will also briefly explore the context of adoption in 21st century Britain and how trauma affects those loving relationships.