Potters people still potty about their teapots


Share |
Posted on 25 November 2013
Drinking tea is synonymous with the region and a popular British tradition, which is why we decided to hone in on this favourite past time.

Staffordshire is still potty about its teapots, with 80 per cent of residents owning at least one and two thirds brewing tea in a pot on a regular basis, according to new research from Keele University Conferences and Events.  

The survey, carried out ahead of its first Christmas Afternoon Tea at Keele Hall, revealed Staffordshire residents own more teapots than anywhere else in the country, with a quarter (26 per cent) owning two and 14 per cent housing three or more in their cupboards. 

More than two thirds (63 per cent) of Staffordshire people asked still use a teapot regularly compared to 50 per cent of the nation. Meanwhile 38 per cent of potters are proud to celebrate their local and national heritage by using a teapot and associate the ceramic with being English, compared to a national average of 27 per cent who made the association.   

In addition, the research cited that 81 per cent of people living in Staffordshire would drink out of a teapot more often if they had the time, compared to 66 per cent of the rest of the country.

The research comes just weeks after Hollywood star Russell Crowe expressed his love for Staffordshire pottery tea cups, taking to Twitter to ask fans where he could track down a rare collection made by Gladstone Pottery.   

To celebrate Staffordshire’s love for tea, Keele University Conferences and Events will be hosting a Christmas afternoon tea at its historic Keele Hall for the first time on 1 December. Attendees will be invited to tuck into a selection of festive sweet treats, tea and mulled wine.  Keele will also be opening the doors to its exclusive Mason ceramic collection, which is usually only open to guests on request.  The rare collection was crafted by Mason Ironstone, one of the most prominent names in British ceramics, and dates back to the early nineteenth century.

Marcus Wilson, Head of Commercial Marketing at Keele University, comments: “It’s great to find that the people of Staffordshire still love their teapots and are supporting their local heritage by doing so. Drinking tea is synonymous with the region and a popular British tradition, which is why we decided to hone in on this favourite past time.

“We look forward to welcoming guests to Keele Hall for our first Christmas afternoon tea where we’ll be showcasing the historic Mason collection and raising a mug or two to Staffordshire’s love for tea – teapots at the ready!”

Key stats

  80 per cent of Staffordshire residents own at least one teapot.   63 per cent of the region regularly use a teapot, compared to the national average of 50 per cent.   38 per cent of Staffordshire residents associate teapots with being English.   81 per cent of the region would use a teapot more often if they had the time.   One quarter (26 per cent) of people living in Staffordshire own two teapots and 14 per cent own three or more.   48 per cent of Staffordshire residents use a teapot on special or social occasions, against a national average of 34 per cent.   Just 18 per cent of people living in Staffordshire said they never want to use a teapot, compared to a national average of 34 per cent.   The survey found one of the main reasons for using a teapot is because it makes tea taste better.   On average, people in Staffordshire drink four cups of tea per day.

To make an afternoon tea booking, contact the team on 01782 733 661 or commercial.specialevents@keele.ac.uk

For more information about Keele University Conferences and Events, visit www.keele-conference.com

 


back