Aluminium’s interface with living systems


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Posted on 23 November 2011

Aluminium’s potential role in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and cancer, specifically breast cancer, and the potential role for aluminium adjuvants in vaccine-related adverse effects are spotlighted in the latest issue of the Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry (JIB).

The November issue of the Journal includes papers of presentations made at the Ninth Keele Meeting on Aluminium in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada. This is the Eighth Keele Meeting issue of JIB and it was guest edited by Christopher Exley from The Birchall Centre at Keele University, Staffordshire, UK.

The papers cover the full range of the natural sciences though with special emphasis upon the inorganic chemistry of aluminium’s interface with living systems including humans. There is a special emphasis upon the latter, human exposure to aluminium, in this selection of papers including research detailing the influence of aluminium at the molecular, cellular, organ and whole body level. The subjects of aluminium’s potential role in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and cancer, specifically breast cancer, are re-visited, while there are also papers which highlight a potential role for aluminium adjuvants in vaccine-related adverse effects.

Once again the Keele Meeting issue of JIB delivers an intriguing flavour of aluminium’s impact upon all living systems and raises new and exciting issues concerning a potential role in human disease.


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