Professor Frédéric Tripet

Title: Professor in Medical and Molecular Entomology
Phone: +44 (0)1782 733873
Email: f.tripet@keele.ac.uk
Location: Huxley Building : 173
Role: Director Centre for Applied Entomology and Parasitology
Contacting me: Try my office or email me
frederic tripet

Professor Frederic Tripet is Director of the Centre for Applied Entomology & Parasitology at the University of Keele. He holds a doctorate in Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Bern, Switzerland, complemented by postdoctoral training in Molecular Biology and Population Genetics from the University of California Los Angeles, University of Texas Medical Branch and University of California Davis. His collaborative research partnerships with major vector endemic countries span five continents and focus on the applied integrative biology of mosquitoes that transmit human pathogens, such as Malaria, Dengue, Chikungunya and Zika, with a view on developing novel tools for their control.

Prof. Frederic Tripet is a partner and field entomology technical coordinator on the Target Malaria consortium, a not-for-profit research consortium sponsored by the National Institutes for Health and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation that aims to develop new approaches to sterile male mosquito releases to reduce the population of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes in sub-Saharan Africa.

Arthropod-borne diseases are responsible for the death of millions of people per year. Research in my laboratory focuses on integrative biology of arthropods that transmit major human diseases. Our research projects combine studies in molecular ecology, ecological genomics, population genetics and behaviour in order to generate results of broad ecological importance that feed back on our understanding of vector population structure, pathogen transmission and vector control. We have ongoing projects and collaborations on Anopheles gambiae the vector of Malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa and Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus vectors of Dengue fever. Past projects include population genetic studies on Triatoma dimidiata vector of Chaga’s disease in Central America, and Sandflies vectors of Leishmaniasis in various parts of the world.

 

ISTM_tripet_images3+4

 

Above left: Female Lutzomia longipalpis vector of Leishmaniasis feeding (WHO/TDR/Stammers)

Above right:  Female Aedes albopictus vector of dengue feeding (WHO/TDR/LSTM)

 

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Above left: A triatomine bug (Rhodnius prolixus) vector of Chaga’s disease feeding (WHO/TDR/Stammers)

Above right: Multiplication of Trypanosoma cruzii amastigotes and destruction of adjacent host heart tissue (WHO/TDR/Stammers)

 

Research projects

Mosquito Reproductive Behaviour

An important focus of our research since the late 1990s has been Mosquito Mating Behaviour. Why is it so relevant to vector control and disease transmission?

ISTM_tripet_image7 First, mosquito mating behaviours such as swarming and mate choice are key to our understanding of population structure and speciation in the Anopheles gambiae complex whose recently-diverged sibling species are responsible for the majority of transmission in Africa (Fig. 1 - Section I). Second, identifying mechanisms of mate recognition could lead to the development of new vector control approaches and is key to the production of competitive males for malaria control strategies relying on mosquito releases (Section II). Finally, interspecific reproductive interactions between mosquito species such those described between the Yellow fever and Tiger mosquitoes can be important determinants of their distribution, hence their vectorial importance (Section III).

Fig. 1 - The sibling species of the Anopheles gambiae complex are the main vectors of malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa and are responsible for hundred-thousands of deaths yearly in endemic regions

I. Functional speciation genomics of Anopheles gambiae

Novel molecular assays of sperm Mechanisms of conspecific mate recognition such as spatial swarm segregation and close range mate recognition mechanisms are particularly relevant to our understanding of speciation in the Anopheles gambiae complex. In collaboration with the Malaria Research and Training Centre in Bamako, Mali, we pioneered genetic analyses of sperm transferred to females in order to quantify pre-mating reproductive barriers in this species complex (Tripet et al. 2001-2003) (Fig. 2).

Fig. 2 - Novel molecular assays of sperm transferred to females have enabled studies of assortative mating and reproductive investment in An. gambiae

Thanks to support from the Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC), Medical Research Council (MRC) and Department for International Development (DFID), we identified several candidate assortative mating genes associated to the pericentromeric region of the X-chromosome speciation island through functional comparative genomics studies (Aboagye-Antwi et al. 2015) (Fig. 3). This work laid the foundations for functional studies of speciation genes in collaboration with the Institut de Recherche des Sciences de la Santé, Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso and the University of Ghana, Legon.

Genomic structure of recombinant strains

Fig. 3 - Genomic structure of recombinant strains - The genomes of the assortatively-mating RbMM, RbSS and parental Mopti strains were compared using FST estimates at ~3x106 SNP marker loci (left Y-axis and red, blue and black lines). The genomic region introgressed from Kisumu into the Mopti genetic background and differing between the RbMM and RbSS recombinant strains is characterized by high FST values (blue shade) and extends from position ~14.5Mb to the centromere on chromosome X. The RbMM and RbSS differed at 160 protein-changing positions all of which located within the introgressed island and flanking region (right Y-axis, grey histogram bars). The pericentromeric region sharing conserved fixed differences with the field Anopheles coluzzii and gambiae s.s populations starts at position ~18.1Mb (orange shade). The position of inversions c, u and a on chromosome 2 is indicated (pink shade).

II. Ecology and genetics of mosquito release projects

The reproductive phenotype of mass-produced males for mosquito release strategies is key to the success and cost-effectiveness of such approaches (Diabate and Tripet 2015). Thanks to a Wellcome Trust Programme grant and a collaboration with other CAEP members and the Malaria Research Training Center in Bamako, Mali and, we were able to investigate the impact of genetic transformation, colonization and laboratory rearing on the male reproductive phenotype, leading to suggestions for improved breeding schemes (Patton et al. 2013ab, Baeshen et al. 2014, Ekechukwu et al. 2015). How the release of maladapted strains could potentially drive behavioural shifts in natural populations is being investigated through in-silico simulations studies (Fig. 4).

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Fig. 4 - Example of simulation models designed to study complex effects of male mating competitiveness on the rate of spread of a Medea-like gene drive construct. The distribution of mating phenotype of the target population is plotted in relation to time (generation). Left: In blue, the release at generation 0 of a large number of GM individuals with mating phenotype and variance comparable to the target population is simulated (conspicuous high peak at generation 0). Centre: In red, the build up of transgene carriers in the target population is shown, taking around 7 generations for all individuals to carry the transgene. Right: Simulated dynamics of the same transgene when released males have a phenotypic distribution slightly divergent from and less variable than that of the target population. In this case it may take up to 20 generations for the transgene to spread through the entire population.

III. Satyrization of Aedes aegypti by Aedes albopictus

Through molecular detection of interspecific sperm in field-collected females and a collaboration with the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, we established the possible role of mating behaviour in competitive displacement of the Yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti by the Tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus in the USA (Tripet et al. 2011). This work now focuses on mosquito population in South-East Asia in collaboration with the Vector Control Unit, University Sains Malaysia in Penang.

Other collaborative projects

- Population genetics studies aimed at understanding the population structure and dispersal between the sylvatic, peri-domestic and domestic habitats of kissing bugs, Triatomina dimidiata, the vector of Trypanosoma cruzii in the Yucatan, Mexico (with Immunologist Dr. Eric Dumonteil, University of the Yucatan, Merida, Mexico).

- Population structure and taxonomy of phlebotominae in the Soudan (with Noteila Khalid, University of Khartoum and Dr. Dia Elnaiem, National Institutes of Health, USA)

- Population structure of Aedes caspius, vector of Rift valley fever in Saudi Arabia (with Drs Ashraf Ahmed, Mourad Aboul-Soud and Abdullaziz Alkedhairy, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia)

Further details

 

Selected Publications

  • Niang A, Nignan C, Sawadogo SP, Maiga H, Konate L, Faye O, Dabire RK, Tripet F, Diabate A. 2017. ASSESSMENT OF THE POST-ZYGOTIC REPRODUCTIVE BARRIERS BETWEEN ANOPHELES GAMBIAE ET AN-COLUZZII. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE (vol. 95, p. 574). link>
  • Epopa PS, Millogo AA, Collins CM, North A, Tripet F, Benedict MQ, Diabate A. 2017. The use of sequential mark-release-recapture experiments to estimate population size, survival and dispersal of male mosquitoes of the  Anopheles gambiae complex in Bana, a west African humid savannah village. Parasit Vectors, vol. 10(1), 376. link> doi> full text>
  • Sawadogo SP, Niang A, Bilgo E, Millogo A, Maïga H, Dabire RK, Tripet F, Diabaté A. 2017. Targeting male mosquito swarms to control malaria vector density. PLoS One, vol. 12(3), e0173273. link> doi> full text>
  • El-Kersh TA, Ahmed AM, Al-Sheikh YA, Tripet F, Ibrahim MS, Metwalli AAM. Isolation and characterization of native Bacillus thuringiensis strains from Saudi Arabia with enhanced larvicidal toxicity against the mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae (s.l.). Parasites & Vectors, vol. 9(1), 647. link> doi> link> full text>
  • Ekechukwu NE, Baeshen R, Traorè SF, Coulibaly M, Diabate A, Catteruccia F, Tripet F. 2015. Heterosis Increases Fertility, Fecundity, and Survival of Laboratory-Produced F1 Hybrid Males of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles coluzzii. G3 (Bethesda), vol. 5(12), 2693-2709. link> doi> full text>

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Epopa PS, Millogo AA, Collins CM, North A, Tripet F, Benedict MQ, Diabate A. 2017. The use of sequential mark-release-recapture experiments to estimate population size, survival and dispersal of male mosquitoes of the  Anopheles gambiae complex in Bana, a west African humid savannah village. Parasit Vectors, vol. 10(1), 376. link> doi> full text>
  • Sawadogo SP, Niang A, Bilgo E, Millogo A, Maïga H, Dabire RK, Tripet F, Diabaté A. 2017. Targeting male mosquito swarms to control malaria vector density. PLoS One, vol. 12(3), e0173273. link> doi> full text>
  • El-Kersh TA, Ahmed AM, Al-Sheikh YA, Tripet F, Ibrahim MS, Metwalli AAM. Isolation and characterization of native Bacillus thuringiensis strains from Saudi Arabia with enhanced larvicidal toxicity against the mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae (s.l.). Parasites & Vectors, vol. 9(1), 647. link> doi> link> full text>
  • Ekechukwu NE, Baeshen R, Traorè SF, Coulibaly M, Diabate A, Catteruccia F, Tripet F. 2015. Heterosis Increases Fertility, Fecundity, and Survival of Laboratory-Produced F1 Hybrid Males of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles coluzzii. G3 (Bethesda), vol. 5(12), 2693-2709. link> doi> full text>
  • Niang A, Epopa PS, Sawadogo SP, Maïga H, Konaté L, Faye O, Dabiré RK, Tripet F, Diabaté A. 2015. Does extreme asymmetric dominance promote hybridization between Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae s.s. in seasonal malaria mosquito communities of West Africa?. Parasit Vectors, vol. 8, 586. link> doi> full text>
  • Diabate A and Tripet F. 2015. Targeting male mosquito mating behaviour for malaria control. PARASITES & VECTORS, vol. 8, Article ARTN 347. link> doi> full text>
  • Aboagye-Antwi F, Alhafez N, Weedall GD, Brothwood J, Kandola S, Paton D, Fofana A, Olohan L, Betancourth MP, Ekechukwu NE, Baeshen R, Traorè SF, Diabate A, Tripet F. 2015. Experimental swap of Anopheles gambiae's assortative mating preferences demonstrates key role of X-chromosome divergence island in incipient sympatric speciation. PLoS Genet, vol. 11(4), e1005141. link> doi> full text>
  • Maïga H, Damiens D, Niang A, Sawadogo SP, Fatherhaman O, Lees RS, Roux O, Dabiré RK, Ouédraogo GA, Tripet F, Diabaté A, Gilles JRL. 2014. Mating competitiveness of sterile male Anopheles coluzzii in large cages. Malar J, vol. 13, 460. link> doi> full text>
  • Baeshen R, Ekechukwu NE, Toure M, Paton D, Coulibaly M, Traoré SF, Tripet F. 2014. Differential effects of inbreeding and selection on male reproductive phenotype associated with the colonization and laboratory maintenance of Anopheles gambiae. Malaria Journal, vol. 13, 19. link> doi> link> full text>
  • Carter V, Underhill A, Baber I, Sylla L, Baby M, Larget-Thiery I, Zettor A, Bourgouin C, Langel U, Faye I, Otvos L, Wade JD, Coulibaly MB, Traore SF, Tripet F, Eggleston P, Hurd H. 2013. Killer Bee Molecules: Antimicrobial Peptides as Effector Molecules to Target Sporogonic Stages of Plasmodium. PLoS Pathogens. doi> full text>
  • Maïga H, Niang A, Sawadogo SP, Dabiré RK, Lees RS, Gilles JRL, Tripet F, Diabaté A. 2014. Role of nutritional reserves and body size in Anopheles gambiae males mating success. Acta Trop, vol. 132 Suppl, S102-S107. link> doi>
  • Diabaté A, Bilgo E, Dabiré RK, Tripet F. 2013. Environmentally friendly tool to control mosquito populations without risk of insecticide resistance: the Lehmann's funnel entry trap. Malar J, vol. 12, 196. link> doi> full text>
  • Paton D, Underhill A, Meredith J, Eggleston P, Tripet F. 2013. Contrasted fitness costs of docking and antibacterial constructs in the EE and EVida3 strains validates two-phase Anopheles gambiae genetic transformation system. PLoS One. doi> full text>
  • Paton D, Touré M, Sacko A, Coulibaly MB, Traoré SF, Tripet F. 2013. Genetic and environmental factors associated with laboratory rearing affect survival and assortative mating but not overall mating success in Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto. PLoS One, vol. 8(12), e82631. link> doi> full text>
  • Maïga H, Dabiré RK, Lehmann T, Tripet F, Diabaté A. 2012. Variation in energy reserves and role of body size in the mating system of Anopheles gambiae. J Vector Ecol, vol. 37(2), 289-297. link> doi>
  • Khalid NM, Aboud MA, Alrabba FM, Elnaiem D-EA, Tripet F. 2012. Evidence for genetic differentiation at the microgeographic scale in Phlebotomus papatasi populations from Sudan. Parasit Vectors, vol. 5, 249. link> doi> full text>
  • Chilaka N, Perkins E, Tripet F. 2012. Visual and olfactory associative learning in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto. Malar J, vol. 11, 27. link> doi>
  • Ahmed AM, Shaalan EA, Aboul-Soud MAM, Tripet F, Al-Khedhairy AA. 2011. Mosquito vectors survey in the AL-Ahsaa district of eastern Saudi Arabia. JOURNAL OF INSECT SCIENCE, vol. 11, Article ARTN 176. link> doi> full text>
  • Gourbière S, Dorn P, Tripet F, Dumonteil E. 2012. Genetics and evolution of triatomines: from phylogeny to vector control. Heredity (Edinb), vol. 108(3), 190-202. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Lounibos LP, Robbins D, Moran J, Nishimura N, Blosser EM. 2011. Competitive reduction by satyrization? Evidence for interspecific mating in nature and asymmetric reproductive competition between invasive mosquito vectors. Am J Trop Med Hyg, vol. 85(2), 265-270. link> doi>
  • Aboagye-Antwi F, Guindo A, Traoré AS, Hurd H, Coulibaly M, Traoré S, Tripet F. 2010. Hydric stress-dependent effects of Plasmodium falciparum infection on the survival of wild-caught Anopheles gambiae female mosquitoes. Malar J, vol. 9, 243. link> doi> full text>
  • Aboagye-Antwi F and Tripet F. 2010. Effects of larval growth condition and water availability on desiccation resistance and its physiological basis in adult Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto. Malar J, vol. 9, 225. link> doi> full text>
  • Khalid N, Elnaiem D, Aboud M, Al Rabba F, Tripet F. 2010. Morphometric and molecular differentiation of Phlebotomus (Phlebotomus) sandflies. Med Vet Entomol, vol. 24(4), 352-360. link> doi>
  • Shutt B, Stables L, Aboagye-Antwi F, Moran J, Tripet F. 2010. Male accessory gland proteins induce female monogamy in anopheline mosquitoes. Med Vet Entomol, vol. 24(1), 91-94. link> doi>
  • Tripet F. 2009. Ecological immunology of mosquito-malaria interactions: Of non-natural versus natural model systems and their inferences. Parasitology, vol. 136(14), 1935-1942. link> doi> full text>
  • Herrera-Aguilar M, Be-Barragán LA, Ramirez-Sierra MJ, Tripet F, Dorn P, Dumonteil E. 2009. Identification of a large hybrid zone between sympatric sibling species of Triatoma dimidiata in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, and its epidemiological importance. Infect Genet Evol, vol. 9(6), 1345-1351. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Clegg S, Elnaiem D-E, Ward RD. 2009. Cooperative blood-feeding and the function and implications of feeding aggregations in the sand fly, Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae). PLoS Negl Trop Dis, vol. 3(8), e503. link> doi> full text>
  • Carpenter S, McArthur C, Selby R, Ward R, Nolan DV, Luntz AJM, Dallas JF, Tripet F, Mellor PS. 2008. Experimental infection studies of UK Culicoides species midges with bluetongue virus serotypes 8 and 9. Vet Rec, vol. 163(20), 589-592. link> doi>
  • Wong J, Tripet F, Rasgon JL, Lanzaro GC, Scott TW. 2008. SSCP analysis of scnDNA for genetic profiling of Aedes aegypti. Am J Trop Med Hyg, vol. 79(4), 511-517. link>
  • Coffey LL, Vasilakis N, Brault AC, Powers AM, Tripet F, Weaver SC. 2008. Arbovirus evolution in vivo is constrained by host alternation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, vol. 105(19), 6970-6975. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Aboagye-Antwi F, Hurd H. 2008. Ecological immunology of mosquito-malaria interactions. Trends Parasitol, vol. 24(5), 219-227. link> doi>
  • Esnault C, Boulesteix M, Duchemin JB, Koffi AA, Chandre F, Dabiré R, Robert V, Simard F, Tripet F, Donnelly MJ, Fontenille D, Biémont C. 2008. High genetic differentiation between the M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae in Africa. PLoS One, vol. 3(4), e1968. link> doi> full text>
  • Dumonteil E, Tripet F, Ramirez-Sierra MJ, Payet V, Lanzaro G, Menu F. 2007. Assessment of Triatoma dimidiata dispersal in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico by morphometry and microsatellite markers. Am J Trop Med Hyg, vol. 76(5), 930-937. link>
  • Slotman MA, Tripet F, Cornel AJ, Meneses CR, Lee Y, Reimer LJ, Thiemann TC, Fondjo E, Fofana A, Traoré SF, Lanzaro GC. 2007. Evidence for subdivision within the M molecular form of Anopheles gambiae. Mol Ecol, vol. 16(3), 639-649. link> doi>
  • Edillo FE, Tripet F, McAbee RD, Foppa IM, Lanzaro GC, Cornel AJ, Spielman A. 2007. A set of broadly applicable microsatellite markers for analyzing the structure of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) populations. J Med Entomol, vol. 44(1), 145-149. link> doi>
  • TRIPET F, Cornel A, Fofana A, Wright JA. 2007. Longitudinal survey of knockdown resistance to pyrethroid (kdr) in Mali, West Africa, and evidence of its emergence in the Bamako form of Anopheles gambiae s.s. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 76(1), 81-87.
  • Dumonteil E, Tripet F, Ramirez-Sierra MJ, Payet V, Lanzaro G, Menu F. 2006. Assessement of Triatoma dimidiata dispersal in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico using morphometry and microsatellite markers. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, vol. 75(5), 116. link>
  • Edillo FE, Tripét F, Touré YT, Lanzaro GC, Dolo G, Taylor CE. 2006. Water quality and immatures of the M and S forms of Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis in a Malian village. Malar J, vol. 5, 35. link> doi> full text>
  • Tripet F, Wright J, Lanzaro G. 2006. A new high-performance PCR diagnostic for the detection of pyrethroid knockdown resistance kdr in Anopheles gambiae. Am J Trop Med Hyg, vol. 74(4), 658-662. link>
  • Tripet F, Fournier D, Nonacs P, Keller L. 2006. Kin recognition and the paradoxical patterns of aggression between colonies of a Mojave desert Pheidole ant. INSECTES SOCIAUX, vol. 53(2), 127-135. link> doi>
  • Reimer LJ, Tripet F, Slotman M, Spielman A, Fondjo E, Lanzaro GC. 2005. An unusual distribution of the kdr gene among populations of Anopheles gambiae on the island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. Insect Mol Biol, vol. 14(6), 683-688. link> doi>
  • Gorrochotegui N, Sacko A, Tripet F, Slotman M, Lanzaro GC, Black WC. 2005. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes located throughout the Anopheles gambiae genome. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, vol. 73(6), 194-195. link>
  • Slotman MA, Tripet F, Reimer L, Thiemann T, Meneses C, Fofana A, McAbee R, CorneJ A, Fondjo E, Dolo G, Traore S, Lanzaro GC. 2005. Contrasting patterns of differentiation between the M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae in mali and Cameroon. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, vol. 73(6), 195. link>
  • Tripet F, Wright J, Reimer L, Slotman M, Lanzaro G, Traore S, Dolo G, Fondjo E. 2005. Reproductive isolation among the cryptic taxa of Anopheles gambiae: Evidence from the patterns of emergence and spread of knockdown resistance to pyrethroids in West Africa. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, vol. 73(6), 195. link>
  • Tripet F, Thiemann T, Lanzaro GC. 2005. Effect of seminal fluids in mating between M and S forms of Anopheles gambiae. J Med Entomol, vol. 42(4), 596-603. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Dolo G, Lanzaro GC. 2005. Multilevel analyses of genetic differentiation in Anopheles gambiae s.s. reveal patterns of gene flow important for malaria-fighting mosquito projects. Genetics, vol. 169(1), 313-324. link> doi>
  • Tripet F and Nonacs P. 2004. Foraging for work and age-based polyethism: The roles of age and previous experience on task choice in ants. ETHOLOGY, vol. 110(11), 863-877. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Dolo G, Traoré S, Lanzaro GC. 2004. The "wingbeat hypothesis" of reproductive isolation between members of the Anopheles gambiae complex (Diptera: Culicidae) does not fly. J Med Entomol, vol. 41(3), 375-384. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Touré YT, Dolo G, Lanzaro GC. 2003. Frequency of multiple inseminations in field-collected Anopheles gambiae females revealed by DNA analysis of transferred sperm. Am J Trop Med Hyg, vol. 68(1), 1-5. link>
  • Mutebi JP, Tripet F, Alexander JB, Lanzaro GC. 2002. Genetic differentiation among populations of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera : Psychodidae) in Central and South America. ANNALS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, vol. 95(6), 740-752. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Christe P, Moller AP. 2002. The importance of host spatial distribution for parasite specialization and speciation: a comparative study of bird fleas (Siphonaptera : Ceratophyllidae). JOURNAL OF ANIMAL ECOLOGY, vol. 71(5), 735-748. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Glaser M, Richner H. 2002. Behavioural responses to ectoparasites: time-budget adjustments and what matters to Blue Tits Parus caeruleus infested by fleas. IBIS, vol. 144(3), 461-469. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Jacot A, Richner H. 2002. Larval competition affects the life histories and dispersal behavior of an avian ectoparasite. ECOLOGY, vol. 83(4), 935-945. link> doi>
  • Tripet F, Touré YT, Taylor CE, Norris DE, Dolo G, Lanzaro GC. 2001. DNA analysis of transferred sperm reveals significant levels of gene flow between molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae. Mol Ecol, vol. 10(7), 1725-1732. link> doi>
  • Langen TA, Tripet F, Nonacs P. 2000. The red and the black: habituation and the dear-enemy phenomenon in two desert Pheidole ants. BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY, vol. 48(4), 285-292. link> doi>
  • Richner H and Tripet F. 1999. Ectoparasitism and the trade-off between current and future reproduction. OIKOS, vol. 86(3), 535-538. link> doi>
  • Tripet F and Richner H. 1999. Density-dependent processes in the population dynamics of a bird ectoparasite Ceratophyllus gallinae. ECOLOGY, vol. 80(4), 1267-1277. link>
  • Tripet F and Richner H. 1999. Dynamics of hen flea Ceratophyllus gallinae subpopulations in blue tit nests. JOURNAL OF INSECT BEHAVIOR, vol. 12(2), 159-174. link> doi>
  • Gebhardt-Henrich SG, Heeb P, Richner H, Tripet F. 1998. Does loss of mass during breeding correlate with reproductive success? - A study on Blue Tits Parus caeruleus. IBIS, vol. 140(2), 210-213. link> doi>
  • Tripet F and Richner H. 1997. The coevolutionary potential of a 'generalist' parasite, the hen flea Ceratophyllus gallinae. Parasitology, vol. 115 ( Pt 4), 419-427. link> doi>
  • Tripet F and Richner H. 1997. Host responses to ectoparasites: Food compensation by parent blue tits. OIKOS, vol. 78(3), 557-561. link> doi>
  • TRIPET F and PERRIN N. 1994. SIZE-DEPENDENT PREDATION BY DUGESIA-LUGUBRIS (TURBELLARIA) ON PHYSA-ACUTA (GASTROPODA) - EXPERIMENTS AND MODEL. FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY, vol. 8(4), 458-463. link> doi>
  • Keller L, Milinski M, Frischknecht M, Perrin N, Richner H, Tripet F. 1994. Spiteful animals still to be discovered. Trends Ecol Evol, vol. 9(3), 103. link> doi>

Chapters

  • LANZARO GC, NUZHDIN S, TRIPET F. 2005. Tools for monitoring genetic structure and stability of mosquito populations. In Bridging Laboratory and Field Research for Genetic Control of Disease Vectors. Kitsos L and Knols B (Eds.). link>
  • LANZARO GC and TRIPET F. 2003. Gene flow among populations of Anopheles gambiae: A critical review. In Ecological aspects for application of genetically modified mosquitoes. Takken W and Scott TW (Eds.). (vol. 20). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Press.

Other

  • Niang A, Nignan C, Sawadogo SP, Maiga H, Konate L, Faye O, Dabire RK, Tripet F, Diabate A. 2017. ASSESSMENT OF THE POST-ZYGOTIC REPRODUCTIVE BARRIERS BETWEEN ANOPHELES GAMBIAE ET AN-COLUZZII. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE (vol. 95, p. 574). link>
  • Diabate A, Sanou R, Toe LP, Dabire RK, Tripet F, Prenna E, Habluetzel A, Lavery J. 2015. ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY USE TOOL TO CONTROL MOSQUITO POPULATIONS WITHOUT RISK OF INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE: THE LEHMANN'S FUNNEL ENTRY TRAP. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE (vol. 93, p. 377). link>
  • Niang A, Sawadogo SP, Epopa PS, Maiga H, Konate L, Dabire RK, Diabate A, Tripet F. 2015. GENOMIC ISLANDS, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION AND ASYMMETRIC INTROGRESSION BETWEEN ANOPHELES COLUZZII AND AN. GAMBIAE. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE (vol. 93, p. 363). link>
  • Lanzaro GC and Tripet F. 2003. Gene flow among populations of Anopheles gambiae: A critical review.

Undergraduate

LSC-30003 Human Parasitology

LSC-30004 Experimental projects

LSC-30007 Dissertations

Postgraduate

MSc in Molecular Parasitology and Vector Biology (University of Salford and University of Keele)

Picture Gallery

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Above left: Djenne, Mali - mosque and market (pict F. Tripet)
Above right:  Mango plantation, road to Guinea, Mali (pict F. Tripet)

 

 

 

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Above left: Village on Niger near Mopti, Mali (pict F. Tripet)
Above right:  Dogon escarpment, Mali (pict F. Tripet)

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Above left: Dogon village, Mali (pict F. Tripet)

Above right:  Mosquito breeding sites - pot holes, Mali (pict F. Tripet)

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Above left: Mosquito breeding site - rice field, Mali (pict F. Tripet)

Above right:  Mosquito breeding sites - pool on edge of river, Mali (pict F. Tripet)

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Above: Anopheles gambiae - 4th instar larvae (WHO/TDR/Stammers)

 

 

PhD students

  • Fred Aboagye-Antwi (2005-2009)
  • Doug Patton (2008-2012)
  • Rowida Baeshen (2008-2012)
  • Esther Ekechukwu (2011-2015)
  • Nahla Alhafez (2012-2016)
  • Nancy Dawam (2014-ongoing)
  • Nwamaka Akpodiete (2015-ongoing)

Collaborative co-supervisions

  • Noteila Khalid (2008, University of Khartoum, Soudan)

PhDs students on collaborative grants

  • Abdoulaye Niang (2011), Hamidou Maiga (2011), Simon Sawadogo (2011)

Msc Students

  • Dannielle Robins (2007)
  • Simon Clegg (2007)
  • Bamidele Alabi (2008)
  • Nora Chilaka (2009)
  • Angela Cartlidge (2011)
  • Sandip Kaur (2011)
  • Helen Bradbury (2012)
  • Natasha Hurril (2013)
  • Mauro Pazmino Bethancourt (2014)
  • Aisha Carmichael (2015)
  • Akbar Ganatraz (2015)
  • Harry Thomas (2015)
  • Katie Thornton (2015)
  • Max Davies (2016)
  • Camille White (2016)

Postdoctoral Research Associates
Wellcome Trust Programme Grant (2008-2011)

  • Vicky Carter, Emma Ward, Ibrahim Baber, Mahamoudou Touré

MRC-DFID African Research Leader Grant (2011-2016)

  • Abdoulaye Niang (2016), Hamidou Maiga (2015), Simon Sawadogo (2014)

Visiting scientists

  • Wan Fatma Zuharah (2016, Sabbatical, University of Sains Malaysia)