Dr Nia Hughes

Title: Senior Lecturer
Phone: +44 (0)1782 734264
Email: n.hughes@keele.ac.uk
Location: Darwin 1.39
Role:
Contacting me:

I joined Keele University in August 2005 as a Senior Teaching Fellow, and became a Senior Lecturer in 2009. Prior to this, I had 16 years experience in the higher education sector, teaching and managing Business and Management programmes. I have also travelled extensively whilst working in the University sector, as a programme advisor and external examiner and have taught modules in China, Malaysia and Singapore. My teaching experience since 1989 includes a wide variety of undergraduate, postgraduate and professional (Chartered Institute of Marketing) courses. On arrival at Keele, I led a course development team through the process of developing a new postgraduate programme, the MA in Marketing, which continues to run very successfully.

Before I joined Academia I spent time working as a civil servant and local government officer. I have also been self-employed in the antiques and collectables trade. It was only after all this that I decided, as a mature student, to return to full-time education in order to enhance my employability and to widen the range of jobs open to me.  Once I found my way into academia, I realised I had found something I was good at and have always loved teaching, ever since, and I hope this comes through in my classrooms. I have supervised many Masters students in a wide variety of contexts, industries and sectors, and find that student projects and dissertations provide interesting analyses of companies, customers and consumers, whether focused mainly on the practical or the theoretical. 

My scholarly interests centre on consumption, consumer research and material culture, particularly in the context of collecting and collectors. In particular I am interested in the following: the meanings associated with collectable possessions in the context of family relationships; the gendered consumption practices found within collecting dyads; and the collaborative, competitive and co-operative collecting behaviours found in the social and cultural world of the collector. My research is underpinned by a social constructionist epistemology.

My PhD was done in the context of collectors and collectables and focused on how value is socially constructed and the way in which an individual’s consumption is socially and culturally mediated by friends, acquaintances, experts, media and institutions. Sounds a bit dry, but it was actually fascinating (to me!)

Selected Publications

  • Hughes N and Hogg MK. 2006. Conceptualizing and Exploring Couple Dyads in the World of Collecting. ADVANCES IN CONSUMER RESEARCH, VOL 33 (vol. 33, pp. 124-130). link>
  • Hughes N and Hogg MK. 2006. Multiple realities, multiple meanings and a mountain of objects. European Advances in Consumer Research, vol. 7.
  • Hughes N. 2003. Co-existing consumer behaviours: women collect rubbish whilst men collect art?.
  • Hughes N. 2003. Collectors in their social world: a subculture of consumption? Towards a research agenda.
  • Hughes N. 2002. Collectors in their social world: a subculture of consumption.

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Hughes N and Hogg MK. 2006. Multiple realities, multiple meanings and a mountain of objects. European Advances in Consumer Research, vol. 7.

Other

  • Hughes N and Hogg MK. 2006. Conceptualizing and Exploring Couple Dyads in the World of Collecting. ADVANCES IN CONSUMER RESEARCH, VOL 33 (vol. 33, pp. 124-130). link>
  • Hughes N. 2003. Co-existing consumer behaviours: women collect rubbish whilst men collect art?.
  • Hughes N. 2003. Collectors in their social world: a subculture of consumption? Towards a research agenda.
  • Hughes N. 2002. Collectors in their social world: a subculture of consumption.
  • Hughes N. 2001. Subjects and their objects: a brief review of the collector and the collected.
  • Hughes N. Problematizing gendered interpretations of collecting behaviour.
MAN-30049 Consuming Cultures

Explores marketing and consumption as a phenomenon situated in its cultural and social context. As such it takes a non-traditional view of consumption and consumers and instead looks at the way in which the social and cultural influences ‘ways of being’ and ‘ways of buying’.


MAN-20060 Services Marketing

All students are customers and can bring in their own experiences into the classroom, and analyse them, when we explore services marketing. The assessment is based on students’ own experience, in fact.

MAN-20062 Marketing in Society

Explores the ethical and moral responsibilities of companies and managers with respect to their marketing activities. We explore ethical theory and apply it to practical situations. We look at the role of marketing managers and the difficulties they face as marketers, whether involved in social media marketing or in advertising. This module draws on current affairs and news items on matters such as: product safety and recalls; charities and their choice of commercial partners; consumer boycotts; the ethical approaches of globalised marketing companies; the privacy of consumers etc.