Researcher Summer School 2020

The Researcher Summer School provides an opportunity for postgraduate researchers, research-active staff and staff linked to research, to further their professional and career development through a week of workshops, all FREE to attend. 

Usually our Researcher Summer School takes place in Keele Hall on the Keele campus - however due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year we offered a virtual Summer School, with all sessions taking place within Microsoft Teams. For this first year, we also opened the development opportunity to postgraduate researchers across the Higher Education sector. 

All workshops part of the evennt were mapped to the Researcher Development Framework (RDF). The RDF articulates the knowledge, behaviours and attitudes of successful researchers and is a tool for planning, promoting and supporting your personal, professional and career development.

 

The schedule for each day can be found below.

Summer School at a glance

Schedule for the week

  10:00 - 11:00 11:00 - 11:15 11:15 - 12:15 12:15 - 13:15 13:15 - 14:45 14:45 - 15:00 15:00 - 16:00 Evening
Monday 3 August    

Open Access Research

Lunch

Having Honest Conversations

Comfort Break

Resources and activities to help you manage your PhD

 
Tuesday 4 August

Scientific Writing for Journal Publication

  
Lunch

Knowing and telling: Understanding and showcasing your PhD for employment outside of academia

Comfort Break

Action Planning your Skill Development for Research and Employability using the RDF

 
Wednesday 5 August

Reading Retreat

  How Science is Used in Parliament  
Thursday 6 August

Creating an Academic Poster using Microsoft PowerPoint

Comfort Break

Reference Management with RefWorks Q&A

Lunch

Introduction to Research Integrity, Governance and Ethics

  How Could your Research Contribute to a Sustainable Future? 

6pm

KPA Murder Mystery

Reading Retreat

Friday 7 August

Writing Retreat

8pm 

KPA Quiz

 There were also digital resources available throughout the week, to explore at delegates own pace:

  • Writing a Literature Review
  • RefWorks online Sway presentation
  • Online Escape Room
  • Avoiding Plaigiarism

Explore the sessions for each day using the tabs below:

MONDAY: For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

11:15 - 12:15 Open Access Research
12:15 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15 - 14:45

Having Honest Conversations

14:45 - 15:00

Comfort Break

15:00 - 16:00 Resources and activities to help you manage your PhD

 

11:15 - 12:15 Open Access and Research Publication: Post-REF Developments and Directions (RDF: A1, B3, C1, D2 and D3)

Facilitator: Scott McGowan

Highly relevant to: all researchers

As the current Research Excellence Framework (REF) period ends, the thoughts of policymakers, funders and other stakeholders are turning to ambitous new open access research publication policies. These policy decisions will undoubtedly have further implications for researchers and how they publish their research findings, and Scott's session aims to outline some of the key themes and challenges for researchers and their institutions.


13:15 - 14:45 Having Honest Conversations (RDF: D1, D2 and B1)

Facilitator: Emma Colley

Highly relevant to: all researchers

One of the most challenging parts of managing performance is initiating conversations around sensitive topics. Being able to tackle contentious issues in a balanced, calm and consistent way is a valued skill in all areas of working life. In a workplace context these skills can help promote productive and engaged teams and a better managed workforce. By the end of the session participants will be able to: - Engage in a range of meaningful research conversations with confidence. 


15:00 - 16:00  Resources and activities to help you manage your PhD (RDF: A1, B1, B2, D1 and D2)

Facilitators: Dr Chris Little and Dr Rachel Westwood 

Highly relevant to: PGRs, Early Career Researchers

This short session will introduce you to tools to help you maintain your progress at all points throughout your PhD study. It will involve a critical look at what slows us down, and what might allow us to feel more confident. The facilitators will introduce lots of freely available technology to assist you in the reading and writing of your PhD.

TUESDAY: For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

10:00 - 11:00 Scientific Writing for Journal Publication
12:15 - 13:15 Lunch
13:15 - 14:45 Knowing and telling: Understanding and showcasing your PhD for employment outside of academia
14:45 - 15:00 Comfort break
15:00 - 16:00  Action Planning your Skill Development for Research and Employability using the RDF

 

10:00 - 11:00 Scientific Writing for Journal Publication (RDF: D2)

Facilitator: Divya Chari

Highly relevant to: PGRs, Early Career Researchers

This session will support the development of writing skills for journal publication. It is particularly relevant to scientists but the principles covered will be relevant to several disciplines. Communicating your work in writing in a clear and concise manner is a critical skill for scientific success. The session will demonstrate that forward planning for publication from an early stage is an important first step. It will also show you the manuscript structure you need to aim for, to help you gather the relevant information for your paper. This will make your writing task less arduous and of better quality. The session will be in two parts: (a) Preparation before starting to write a manuscript: Here, the focus will be on early project planning, ensuring collection of high quality data and images, considering the element of novelty to attract attention to your research and choosing a target journal. (b) Planning and structuring the manuscript itself: Here, participants will learn in detail about the individual elements of a manuscript. This section will also lead you through the phases of manuscript preparation, from a draft stage to the final version. Learning Objectives / Outcomes: By the end of the session attendees will: 1. Understand the importance of the initial planning stages for manuscript writing 2. Understand the detailed structure of a scientific paper 3. Gain practical guidance and tips about writing a scientific manuscript 4. Have undertaken some practical exercises relevant to preparing a manuscript.


13:15 - 14:45  Knowing and telling: Understanding and showcasing your PhD for employment outside of academia (RDF: B3)

Facilitator: Sarah Longwell, Careers Consultant

Highly relevant to: PGRs, Early Career Researchers

This session will give you and introductory insight into: The value of the skills and behaviours gained from the PhD process The competencies, skills and attributes sought by potential employers Strategies for enhancing impact and developing your profile


15:00 - 16:00 Action Planning your Skill Development for Research and Employability using the RDF (RDF: B3)

Facilitator: Dr Rachel Westwood

Highly relevant to: PGRs, Early Career Researchers

This session will explain what the Research Development Framework is and how to use it as a tool for skill development. The session will include practical activities to help you to map out your development priorities and personal development plans to succeed in your research and career aspirations.

 

WEDNESDAY: Reading Retreat, led by Angela Rhead (RDF: A1, A2, B2)

Highly relevant to: all research students and staff

Academic Reading Retreats are an opportunity to develop critical reading practices with a focus on academic journal papers. They are whole-day workshops where participants pre-select one or two journal articles relevant to their research interests, which become the focus for their day’s activities. Various aspects and approaches to anlaysing and synthesising academic papers are presented in online presentations and seminars throughout the retreat, each followed by offline individual reading phases, followed by a return to online group discussion. We begin the day with a review of the function of journal papers in the academic world. We then establish a framework for getting to grips with individual papers efficiently and effectively. After opportunities to practice with these new techniques, we then move on to strategies for synthesising several papers to manage and develop a literature review.


 

Parallel Session 15:00 - 16:00 :How Science and Research are used within Parliament (RDF: D3)

Facilitator: Susie Wright, Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST)

Highly relevant to: all researchers


This session will give an overview of the UK Parliament and how research is used within Parliament. It will cover Select Committees, legislative scrutiny, the House of Commons and House of Lords libraries, and the Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology (POST). It will also include details of how researchers can engage with and communicate their research to Parliament. A Q&A session will allow researchers to ask questions about the work of Parliament and opportunities to engage.

THURSDAY: For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

Either: 

Full day Reading Retreat, led by Angela Rhead (RDF: A1, A2, B2)

Highly relevant to: all research students and staff

Academic Reading Retreats are an opportunity to develop critical reading practices with a focus on academic journal papers. They are whole-day workshops where participants pre-select one or two journal articles relevant to their research interests, which become the focus for their day’s activities. Various aspects and approaches to anlaysing and synthesising academic papers are presented in online presentations and seminars throughout the retreat, each followed by offline individual reading phases, followed by a return to online group discussion. We begin the day with a review of the function of journal papers in the academic world. We then establish a framework for getting to grips with individual papers efficiently and effectively. After opportunities to practice with these new techniques, we then move on to strategies for synthesising several papers to manage and develop a literature review.

OR running in parallel, the following sessions:

10:00 - 11:00 Creating an Academic Poster using Microsoft PowerPoint
11:00 - 11:15 Comfort break
11:15 - 12:15 Introducing RefWorks for Reference Management
12:15 - 13:15 Lunch
13:15 - 14:45 Introduction to Research Integrity, Governance and Ethics
15:00 - 16:00 How could your research contribute to a sustainable future?

 

10:00 - 11:00 Creating an Academic Poster using Microsoft PowerPoint (RDF: D2, A2, A3) 

Facilitator: Karl Gimblett, Learning Technologist

Highly relevant to: all research students and staff

This webinar will teach you how to use Microsoft PowerPoint to create clear, impactful academic posters. Good and poor examples will be presented and you will be equipped with the technical and style skills to help you create great posters to showcase your work.


11:15 - 12:15 Introducing RefWorks for Reference Management (RDF: A1)

Facilitator: Scott Chesworth, Liaison and Research Support Librarian

Highly relevant to: all research students and staff

When you're working on dissertations or theses, you'll be expected to use information from other sources and it's important to find an effective way to manage the references from those sources. One way you can do this is by using reference management software and the Library subscribes to a cloud based service called RefWorks. Please take a look at the Microsoft Sway presentation ahead of this session, where the Library's Liaison and Research Support Librarian, Scott Chesworth, will be available live to answer any questions you may have.


13:15 - 14:45 Introduction to Research Integrity, Governance and Ethics 

Facilitator: Tracy Nevatte 


15:00 - 16:00 How could your research contribute to a sustainable future? (RDF: A1, A3, B1, B3, C1, D1, D3)

Facilitators: Zoe Robinson & Sarah Briggs

Highly relelevant to: all researchers

Our society and environment are facing a wide range of sustainability challenges, and the urgency with which these challenges need to be tackled is increasing. Whatever your disciplinary background your research has sustainability implications and applications. This session will bring researchers from all backgrounds together to consider how their research and discipline can contribute to the sustainability issues highlighted through the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, and connect these to the key challenges that Keele’s Institute for Sustainable Futures aims to address. Through understanding the ways our research can contribute to, affects, or could be impacted by sustainability problems, we can develop collaboration, partnership, and the genuine transdisciplinary working that is required to bring different disciplines and stakeholders together in positive action towards a sustainable future. Through this workshop you will: - Learn more about the work and ethos of the University's Institute for Sustainable Futures and how to get involved - Explore the sustainability implications and applications of your research - Explore ways to ensure impactful research, that leads to positive change for a sustainable future

10:00 - 16:00 Writing Retreat, led by Kizzy Beaumont

Highly relevant to: all research students and staff

 

The Virtual Writing Retreat will be a day for you to work with a community of remote researchers who will work together on a shared schedule for accountability and support. Following a similar schedule to the face-to-face writing retreats we will take time to prepare and reflect and set aside protected time to get those words down on 'paper'.

Download the Researcher Summer School Schedule

Download the Researcher Summer School Schedule (58 KB)