Researcher Summer School 2019

The Researcher Summer School provides an opportunity for postgraduate researchers, research-active staff and staff linked to research, to further their professional and career development through a week of workshops, all FREE to attend, and hosted in Keele Hall.

Most workshops are targeted at postgraduate researchers, but some sessions are suitable for research staff, particularly early career researchers.

All workshops are mapped to the Researcher Development Framework (RDF). The RDF articulates the knowledge, behaviours and attitudes of successful researchers and is a tool for planning, promoting and supporting your personal, professional and career development.

Click on the tabs below to find out what we did each day during the 2019 event, and view the full timetable for the week here

For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

 The Old Library The Elizabeth Room
09:00 - 09:30 Refreshments 09:00 - 09:30 Refreshments
09:30 - 16:30 Full day Academic Reading Retreat (includes refreshments and lunch) 10:00 - 12:00 Running Focus Groups: The Basics
    14:00 - 16:00

An Introduction to Research Integrity, Governance and Ethics

The Old Library

9:30 - 16:30 Academic Reading Retreat (RDF: A2) This workshop includes lunch as well as morning and afternoon refreshments.
Highly relevant to: PGR students

The Academic Reading Retreat is an opportunity to develop critical reading practices, with a focus on academic journal articles. Participants need to bring one or two journal articles relevant to their research interests, to use as their personal focus for the day’s activities. Various aspects and approaches to academic reading are presented throughout the retreat, each followed by silent individual reading, and then group discussion.


The Elizabeth Room

10:00 - 12:00 Running Focus Groups: The Basics (RDF: A1) 
Highly relevant to: Early – Mid career staff and PGR students

There are a number of qualitative research methods that educators and researchers can use to generate and explore their question areas. One of the most popular research methods that people select to use is to run a focus group because they can reveal a great wealth of information in a short period of time. This workshop will address the logistics and basics of running a focus group and will provide a space to share questions and explore answers with a view to making sure that everyone is able to pick this as a research method for the right reasons and then make it happen.

14:00 - 15:00 An Introduction to Research Integrity, Governance and Ethics (RDF:C1, C2)
Highly relevant to: Early – Mid career staff and PGR students

This session will provide you with the basic knowledge you need to enable you to consider the right questions when applying for ethical approval, mitigating risk and ensuring high-quality research. By the end of the session you will:

  • Understand the difference between integrity, governance and ethics and the significance of each to your research.
  • Have the knowledge to plan research projects that meet legislative standards and local good research practice requirements, including GDPR compliance.

For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

 The Old Library The Elizabeth Room
09:30 - 11:00 Giving Presentations: The Logistics and Biology of Presenting    
11:00 - 11:15 Refreshments    
11:15 - 12:45 Embedding Public Engagement in Research at Keele: an introduction    
12:45 - 13:45 Lunch    
13:45 - 15:15 (parallel session) Tips for Proofreading your Own Work 13:45 - 15:15 (parallel session) Using Google Forms and Google Keep
The Old Library

09:30 - 11:00 Giving Presentations: The Logistics and Biology of Presenting (RDF: D2) 
Highly relevant to: PGR students and early career staff

This session will explore some of the myths and good practice around giving effective presentations in professional environments and explore a number of techniques to help all presenters improve or refine their presentations skills as well as offer a range of practical tips on how to make your presentations impactful and more effective. By the end of the session you will have:

  • An understanding of the core principals of giving an effective presentation
  • Observed and discussed good practice examples focussing on presentation skills

11:15 - 12:45 Embedding Public Engagement in Research at Keele: an Introduction (RDF: D3)
Highly relevant to: PGR students and all research staff

Public engagement and impact are playing increasingly important roles in the research landscape, and in how research is funded and evaluated. This workshop will provide an introduction to public engagement with research (PER), why it’s important and how it can benefit your work. It will draw on lessons from Keele’s SEE-PER project, which aimed to embed PER within the institution, and showcase examples of PER from across the university. The session will include a practical activity where you will map out potential routes to engagement from your research and highlight resources available for ongoing support.

13:45 - 15:15 (parallel session) Tips for Proofreading your Own Work (RDF: D2 & A3)
Highly relevant to: PGR students

Proof reading your own work can be an onerous task, even with the help of digital tools such as spellchecker, which cannot pick up all errors in your writing. This session will provide you with tips and strategies to undertake proofreading efficiently and effectively.


The Elizabeth Room

13:45 - 15:15 (parallel session) Using Google Forms and Google Keep to Record Notes (RDF: D2 & A3)
Highly relevant to: all research staff and students

This workshop will show you how to create clear, engaging forms suited to many different data-gathering contexts. Additionally, you will be introduced to Google Keep - a useful app aimed at recording and categorising notes (can be text or other media).

For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

Career Wednesday: Exploring the Landscape of Possibilities - Salvin Room, Keele Hall
10:00 - 11:30 Your PhD - What Next?
11:30 - 11:40 Refreshments
11:40 - 12:30 Action Planning your Skill Development for Research and Employability using the RDF
12:30 - 14:30 Networking lunch and postgraduate career path short presentations and stories
14:30 - 16:00 Making a Good Impression

 

10:00 - 11:30 Your PhD What Next? (RDF: B3, D3)
Highly relevant to: PGR students

Working out what you really want from your career and creating a career narrative to make sense of where you have been and where you are going. In this session you will have the opportunity to consider what you are seeking in your life post-PhD whether it be academic or non-academic, explore career decision-making theory and its relevance to your potential pathway, and discover career resources to facilitate your career pathway. By the end of the workshop you will be able to:

  • Embark upon self-analysis as a foundation for career planning;
  • Identify and consider career theory that could underpin your approach to moving towards forming and developing career goals;
  • Locate and use specific PGR and generic resources to pursue.

11:40 - 12:30 Action planning Your Skill Development for Research and Employability using the Research Development Framework (RDF: B3 )
Highly relevant to: PGR students and Early Career staff

This session will explain what the Research Development Framework is and how to use it as a tool for career planning. The session will complement the previous session (Your PhD What Next?) and include practical activities to help you to map out your career priorities and personal development plans to succeed in your career aspirations.

12:30 - 14:30 Networking lunch followed by careers presentations and stories from academia, industry and other types of employment pathway that you may not have considered. (RDF: B1, B3, D3)

14:30 - 16:00 Making a Good Impression (RDF:B3)
This practical workshop will provide an environment to develop and practise a range of skills associated with application forms, CVs, interviews and ongoing career development for PGR students & postdocs.

For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

 The Old Library The Elizabeth Room
10:00 - 11:30 Assertiveness for Researchers    
11:30 - 13:00 Making an Impact: Exploring impact factors in your research?    
13:00 - 14:00 Lunch    
14:00 - 16:00 (parallel session) Finding and Attaining Funding: Grant Writing Tips and Strategies  14:00 - 15:30 (parallel session) Literature Searching using the Library Database*
    15:35 - 16:35 Researcher Conversation and Networking Skills

 

 Keele Postgraduate Association Clubhouse
18:00 KPA Researcher Summer School Social

The Old Library

10:00 - 11:30 Assertiveness for Researchers (RDF: B1) - The Old Library, Keele Hall
Highly relevant to: all research students and staff

This workshop will provide you with practical information about assertive behaviour. By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Recognise assertive behaviour;
  • Identify the benefits of assertive behaviour;
  • Develop an awareness of other types of non-assertive behaviour and the impact they have on communication.

11:30 - 13:00 Making an Impact: Exploring impact factors in your research
Highly relevant to:research staff

This workshop will help you make an informed decision about where to publish and how to measure the impact of you publications. By the end of the session you will:

  • Know which tools allow you measure impact and how to implement them
  • Be able to identify the most influential journals for publishing.

14:00 - 16:00 (parallel session) Finding and Attaining Funding: Grant Writing Tips and Strategies
Highly relevant to: research staff

Grant writing requires a different skill set to other academic writing and this session will help to clarify what is expected, and how to avoid some of the major pitfalls. By the end of the workshop you will:

  • Have an understanding of writing a grant application;
  • Know why review is important;
  • Be able to state the relevance of your research.

The Elizabeth Room 

14:00 - 15.30 (parallel session) Literature Searching using the Library Database (RDF: A1) 
Highly relevant to: PGR students

Find out how to plan and carry out effective literature searches to support your research project using the Library databases.
By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Broaden or refine a search on a database
  • Carry out a citation search
  • Devise an effective search strategy

15:35 - 16:35 Enhancing Researcher Conversation and Networking Skills (RDF: D2)
Highly relevant to: all research students and staff

This workshop aims to deliver key communication skills through dialogue and conversation. In an academic sense, onus is often placed on successful communication being based on transmitting our own message. This workshop challenges this focus by exploring the value of effective listening, including how we listen, barriers to listening, and how listening to others’ perspectives is essential to working effectively with others, as well as a consideration of the importance of one-to-one dialogue in our professional lives and as researchers. This workshop aims to develop skills to have meaningful conversations about our own research, and to challenge the way we engage with other researchers and academics by considering alternative perspectives and approaches to our subject area.


KPA Clubhouse - Researcher Summer School Social

18:00 - Take a break and enjoy mingling with fellow postgrads at an event hosted by your postgraduate union! In collaboration with KIITE's Researcher Summer School, the KPA Clubhouse will be holding a social event, with a free buffet on Thursday 8th of July from 6.00pm.

For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

09:30 - 12:30 Writing Retreat (1/2 day)
12:30 - 13:30 Lunch
13:30 - 16:30 Writing Retreat (1/2 day)
The Old Library

09:30 - 16:30 Writing Retreat (RDF: ) This event includes refreshments and lunch
Highly relevant: all research students and staff

The aim of a structured writing retreat is to use dedicated writing time to progress writing projects in a supportive, non-surveillance environment. Example projects include book or thesis chapters, journal articles, research proposals, conference abstracts/papers, reports, etc. All individuals write together in the same room using the same programme of writing slots and refreshment/discussion breaks.