Researcher Summer School 2018

The 2018 Researcher Summer School provided an opportunity for postgraduate researchers, postdocs, research-active staff and staff involved with research to further their professional and career development through a week of workshops.

Click on the tabs below to find out what we did each day during the 2018 event, and view the full timetable for the week here

For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

 Salvin Room The Elizabeth Room
09:30 - 11:00 Assertiveness    
11:00 - 11:15 Refreshments 11:00 - 11:15 Refreshments
11:15 - 12:30 Academic Integrity  

 

12:30 - 13:30 Lunch 12:30 - 13:30 Lunch
13:30 - 15:00 Writing in an Academic Style 13:30 - 15:00 Open Access and Scholarly Communication
15:00 - 15:15 Refreshments 15:00 - 15:15 Refreshments
15:15 - 16:30 Digital Scholarship and Blogging    
The Salvin Room

09:30 - 11:00  Assertiveness (RDF: B1)

This workshop will provide you with information on assertive behaviour. By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Recognise assertive behaviour;
  • Identify the benefits of assertive behaviour;
  • Develop an awareness of other types of non-assertive behaviour and the impact they have on communication.

11:15 - 12:30   Academic Integrity (RDF: C1)

This workshop will explore some of the conventions of academic integrity in order to help postgraduate research students develop the understanding and skills necessary to avoid plagiarising. By the end of the session you will:

  • Have an understanding of Keele's approach to academic integrity.
  • Be able to employ suitable linguistic techniques which incorporate source material into new text.   

13:30 - 15:00 (Parallel Session 1A)  Writing in an Academic Style (RDF: D2 & A3)

Write more academically' or 'too informal' are supervisors' comments, but what do they mean? This workshop explores what academic language looks like. We explore vocabulary, grammar and punctuation patterns by looking at examples from dissertations. There will be time for discussion of questions or individual difficulties. By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Recognise academic style writing from other styles of writing;
  • Understand the vocabulary, grammar and punctuation patterns that are required for academic writing.     

15:15 - 16:30  Digital Scholarship and Blogging  (RDF: D2 & D3)

Blogging can be useful for researchers, whether as a way to reach out to a wider audience, to build your academic profile and web presence, as an opportunity to explore emergent ideas, or some other purpose. This workshop looks at:

  • The benefits of writing a blog
  • Choosing a blogging platform
  • Considering your audience
  • Writing styles and formats
  • Linking to other social media

By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Evaluate which platform is best for your needs;
  • Explore other considerations such as writing style, audience and related social media;
  • Reflect on the benefits of writing a blog.

The Elizabeth Room

13:30 - 15:00 (Parallel Session 1B)  Open Access and Scholarly Communication (RDF: C1 & A1)

Want to know more about the Open Access (OA) agenda and how you as a researcher need to engage with it? The workshop will provide an introduction to Open Access, and explain how you can meet this new policy requirement for the REF using resources available at Keele.

By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Explore the various options for OA, including the ‘Green’ and ‘Gold’ routes;
  • Learn about embargoes and other conditions of self-archiving;
  • Know how to publish your research OA using the Keele Publications Database.

For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

 Salvin Room The Elizabeth Room
09:30 - 11:00 Giving Presentations: The Logistics and Biology of Presenting    
11:00 - 11:15 Refreshments    
11:15 - 12:30 Managing Anxiety    
12:30 - 13:30 Lunch    
13:30 - 15:00 Project Management 13:30 - 16:30 Communication Skills
15:00 - 15:15 Refreshments    
15:15 - 16:30 Co-authoring, Collaboration and Notetaking using Google Apps    
Salvin Room

09:30 - 11:00  Giving Presentations:The Logistics and Biology of Presenting (RDF: D2)

This session will explore some of the myths and some good practice around giving effective presentations in professional environments. By the end of the session you will have:

  • An understanding of the core principals of giving an effectice presentation.
  • Observed and discussed good practice examples focussing on presentation skills.

11:15 - 12:30  Managing Anxiety (RDF: B2)

The session will focus on the components of anxiety and explore some helpful solutions in reducing it. By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Identify the variations of anxiety;
  • Explore the cognitive, behavioural and physiological aspects, including unhelpful thinking and behaviour patterns;
  • Introduce simple relaxation exercises.

13:30 - 15:00 (Parallel Session 2A) Project Management (RDF: C2)

Discover tools that will help you to effectively manage your research. By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Use appropriate tools to schedule and manage a research project;
  • Monitor progress and deal with any changes, risks or issues that impact on their research;
  • Recognise research stakeholder needs and have a communication plan to meet their expectations.

15:15 - 16:30 (Parallel Session 2A)  Co-authoring, Collaboration and Notetaking using Google Apps (RDF: D1 & A1)

This workshop will help you develop digital collaboration skills using Google Apps. By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Identify cloud apps to suit different academic/research purposes
  • Confidently a use Google Docs to co-author materials
  • Safely share and disseminate digital resources
  • Create shared digital spaces to share ideas and materials

The Elizabeth Room

13:30 - 16:30 (Parallel Session 2B)  Communication Skills (RDF: D2)

Develop your communication skills by learning to listen, exploring dialogue, and reflecting on how to have meaningful conversations about your research. By the end of the session you will:

  • Understand the potential barriers to effective communication;
  • Be able to apply principles of listening to conversations about own research;
  • Reflect on your own communication skills and how to continue developing these skills.

For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

 Salvin Room The Elizabeth Room
09:30 - 11:00 Introduction to Teaching at Keele    
11:00 - 11:15 Refreshments    
11:15 - 12:30 Introduction to the Researcher Development Framework    
12:30 - 13:30 Lunch    
13:30 - 16:30 Grant Writing: Pitfalls from the Front Line 13:30 - 16:30 Career Planning: Your PhD, What Next?

 

Salvin Room

09:30 - 11:00  Introduction to Teaching at Keele (RDF: D3)

This workshop will explore the key resources available to support you in your teaching practice and professional development at Keele; the role of small group teaching in student learning; a range of practical ideas for teaching delivery; discuss situations which may arise in teaching and how to address these effectively; why assessment and feedback are so important to student learning; and the role of evaluation in developing your teaching practice. By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Identify and choose key techniques to use in your teaching
  • Recognise a range of assessment and feedback approaches
  • Explain the role of evaluation and reflection in your teaching practice

11:15 - 12:30   Introduction to the Researcher Development Framework (RDF: B3) 

Find out about Vitae's Researcher Development Framework (RDF) and how to use it to support your professional development. By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Match the twelve subdomains of the RDF to their respective domains;
  • Plan the next stage of your Professional Development using the RDF

13:30-16:30 (Parallel Session 3B)  Grant Writing: Pitfalls from the Front Line (RDF: C3)

Grant writing requires a different skill set to other academic writing and this session will help to clarify what is expected, and how to avoid some major pitfalls. By the end of the workshop you will :

  • Have an understanding of writing a grant application;
  • Know why review is important;
  • Be able to state the relevance of your research.

The Elizabeth Room

13:30-16:30 (Parallel Session 3A)  Career Planning: Your PhD, What next? Bitesize (RDF: B3)

Working out what you really want from your career and creating a career narrative to make sense of where you have been and where you are going. In this session you will have the opportunity to consider what you are seeking in your life post-PhD whether it be academic or non-academic, explore career decision making theory and its relevance to your potential pathway and discover career resources to facilitate your career pathway. By the end of the workshop you will be able to:

  • Embark upon self-analysis as a foundation for career planning;
  • Identify and consider career theory that could underpin your approach to moving towards forming and developing career goals;
  • Locate and use specific PGR and generic resources to pursue.

For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

 Salvin Room The Elizabeth Room
09:30 - 12:30 GDPR for Researchers    
12:30 - 13:30 Lunch    
13:30 - 15:00 Writing a Lay Abstract 13:30 - 15:00  Reference Management with RefWoks 
15:00 - 15:15 Refreshments    
15:15 - 16:30  Literature Searching using the Library Database    

 

Salvin Room

09:30-12:30 GDPR for Researchers (RDF: C1)

This session will provide a background on GDPR and give practical advice, direction and instruction to all who need to comply with the new regulation and how it applies to research. By the end of the session you will:

  • understand how GDPR applies to your research;
  • know the background on GDPR;
  • know what you need to do to be compliant with GDPR.

13:30 - 15:00 (Parallel Session 4A) Writing a Lay Abstract (RDF: D2 & A3)

Who are 'lay reviewers' and how do I write an abstract for them? This workshop will cover the lay review process and help you to avoid the mistakes made by academics when trying to communicate their ideas to non-specialists. By the end of the session you will:

  • Know the structure of an abstract
  • Understand what an abstract is
  • Know why you would use an abstract

15:15 - 16:30  Literature Searching using the Library Databases (RDF: A1)

Find out how to plan and carry out effective literature searches to support your research project using the Library databases. By the end of the session you will be able to:

  • Broaden or refine a search on a database;
  • Carry out a citation search;
  • Devise an effective search strategy.

The Elizabeth Room 

13:30 - 15:00 (Parallel Sesson 4B)  Reference Management with RefWorks (RDF: A1)

Demonstration of New RefWorks - the Library's reference management software - and how to retrieve references from subscription databases and the Internet. By the end of the session you will:

  • Understand how to import references into RefWorks from Library subscription databases;
  • Know how to install the RefWorks tool to import references from any webpage;
  • Know how to organise your references into folders.

 For a full description of each workshop, see the details below the timetable: 

 Salvin Room
09:30 - 12:30 Writing Retreat
12:30 - 13:30 Lunch
13:30 - 16:30 Writing Retreat


Salvin Room

09:30 - 12:30  Writing Retreat

13:30 - 16:30  Writing Retreat

The aim of a writing retreat is to use dedicated writing time to progress writing projects in a supportive, non-surveillance environment. Example projects include: book or thesis chapters, journal articles, research proposals, conference abstracts/papers, reports, etc.  All individuals write together in the same room using the same programme of writing slots and refreshment/discussion breaks.

What to bring to a retreat: Laptop, power cable, memory stick, notes, outlines, ‘model’ paper if helpful, data.

Writing retreats works best when you:

  • Focus exclusively on writing.
  • Do not to use internet in the writing room.
  • Define specific goals and sub-goals, i.e. sections of paper/chapter, number of words.
  • Take stock of your achievements of these goals throughout the day.
  • Discuss your writing-in-progress on breaks to gain mutual peer support.