Biography

I was awarded my PhD in Economics from Keele University in 2010 (doctoral study scholarship award), and prior to that I obtained a BA in Economics (2001) and an MA in Economics for Business Analysis (2003 - postgraduate study scholarship award) from Staffordshire University. I also hold a postgraduate Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education from Keele University (2009).

Before joining Keele University as a lecturer in economics in January 2012, I held lecturing positions in economics at the University of the West of England, Bristol and the University of Swansea. I have worked as a Research Associate with the Learning and Skills Council for Staffordshire and as a Teaching & Learning Technology Assistant at the University of Birmingham.

I am a member of the European Association of Labour Economists and the Royal Economic Society. In 2018 I was awarded a Senior Fellowship with the Higher Education Academy.

Research and scholarship

My main research interests are in labour/social economics, social networks, human capital formation and families' decisions to work. I am particularly interested in the influence of social and institutional factors in the choice of education and employment. Social norms and interactions are changing faster today than they have been for decades. "Traditional" labour markets roles based on gender or class are being revisited and that leads to dynamic labour markets where both individuals/households and employers update and adjust their labour supply and demand behaviour. My research seeks to answer questions around the influence of social networks in individuals' and households' choice of type and/or hours of work and education/training. I am also interested in how institutional factors such as minimum wages or unemployment insurance policies feature in the decision making processes and whether they influence people's behaviour. 
 
What influence do labour market choices have on our health outcomes and how health conditions affect our labour market choices? This is a key question in the literature of health and labour economics. An evolving strand of my research asks how do social factors and processes relate and impact upon these choices? While grounded on economic theory, my research branches out to social science and health research, informing an interdisciplinary dialogue. 
 
I would welcome PhD applications in the above, or related, areas. Some potential headings for PhD study include (but are not limited to):
  • Social influences in the decision to return to the labour force
  • Parenthood and labour market behaviour
  • Risk attitudes and educational choices
  • Health and human capital investment
The School has an annual cycle of PhD bursaries for suitably qualified candidates. Click here for details about the bursaries available
 
Research Grants
 
2012 UK Low Pay Commission project: The elasticity of substitution between young and old workers in the presence of minimum wages.
2010 UK Low Pay Commission project: The Minimum Wage & human Capital Accumulation of Young Low Paid Workers during and Economic Downturn.

Teaching

ECO-10027 Quantitative Methods II

This module develops students' understanding of basic mathematical techniques used in economic analysis and introduces students to fundamental concepts of mathematical statistics (thus departing from the realm of descriptive statistics introduced in ECO-10026 Quantitative Methods I) in preparation for studying ECO-20042 Introduction to Econometrics in year 2 (level 5). In the first part of the module, we discuss how linear and non-linear equations are used to build simple models describing economic behaviour and how to derive fundamental theoretical results. The concept and economic interpretations of differentiation are then presented, followed by an exposition of optimisation - constrained and unconstrained - in the context of economic analysis. The second part of the module focuses on fundamental concepts of probability and probability distributions and their applications in empirical analysis. We discuss sample and population quantities, the concept of random sampling and the sampling distribution, and how the latter is used in inferential statistics.

ECO-30032 Labour Economics

This module develops students' understanding of the labour market and the interactions of economic agents (individuals, firms and the government) with each other and with institutional factors. Theoretical models of labour market behaviour underpin the discussions but focus is on empirical application and policy considerations. The module takes a microeconomics perspective on issues of labour demand and supply, human capital investment decisions, migration and discrimination. Labour market institutions such as trade unions and minimum wages are discussed and the issue of unemployment is explored in both the micro and macroeconomic dimensions.

Selected Publications

  • Lanot G and Sousounis P. 2016. The National Minimum Wage and the Substitutability Between Young and Old Workers in Low Paid Occupations. The Manchester School. doi> link> full text>
  • Lanot G and Sousounis P. 2012. The Substitution Rate Between Low-pay Workers and the National Minimum Wage.
  • Sousounis P and Bladen-Hovell R. Persistence in the determination of work-related training participation: Evidence from the BHPS, 1991–1997. Economics of Education Review, vol. 29, 1005-1010. doi>
  • Sousounis P. 2009. Estimating the effect of state dependence in work-related training participation among British employees.
  • Sousounis P. 2009. The impact of work-related training on employee earnings: Evidence from Great Britain.

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Lanot G and Sousounis P. 2016. The National Minimum Wage and the Substitutability Between Young and Old Workers in Low Paid Occupations. The Manchester School. doi> link> full text>
  • Sousounis P and Bladen-Hovell R. Persistence in the determination of work-related training participation: Evidence from the BHPS, 1991–1997. Economics of Education Review, vol. 29, 1005-1010. doi>

Other

  • Lanot G and Sousounis P. 2012. The Substitution Rate Between Low-pay Workers and the National Minimum Wage.
  • Sousounis P. 2009. Estimating the effect of state dependence in work-related training participation among British employees.
  • Sousounis P. 2009. The impact of work-related training on employee earnings: Evidence from Great Britain.