Dr Ed Chadwick

Title: Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
Phone: +44 (0)1782 674423
Email: e.k.j.chadwick@keele.ac.uk
Location: Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Guy Hilton Research Centre, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7QB United Kingdom
Role: ISTM Research theme: Healthcare Technologies (Theme lead)
Contacting me: By phone or e-mail please
headshot

Dr. Chadwick was appointed to ISTM in September 2012, and leads two modules in the area of medical technology and devices. His research interests are in the application of biomechanical modelling and simulation to the study of upper limb function in a range of neuromuscular disorders including spinal cord injury and stroke. He has a particular interest in the use of functional electrical stimulation (FES) for the restoration of function and in the development of FES devices. He leads the Healthcare Technologies theme within ISTM, and the cross-disciplinary Rehabilitation Research Group. He is the Course Director for the MSc in Biomedical Engineering.

Dr. Chadwick completed his PhD in Bioengineering at Strathclyde University in 1999, after obtaining a degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Nottingham. He taught Biomechanics at Aberystwyth University for three years, and spent a numbers of years as a Senior Research Associate at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, and at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. He currently serves on the Executive Council of the International Society of Biomechanics.

You can also find him on Research Gate, and on Medium where he is making an effort to communicate his work to a more general audience!

ISTM Research theme: Healthcare Technologies

Research Overview

The goal of my research is to facilitate restoration of function in people with movement disorders of the upper limb following stroke, spinal cord injury and other neuromuscular conditions. The restoration of function can allow the resumption of independent living, the maintenance of health through exercise and the reduction of pain and discomfort. My areas of expertise are in shoulder biomechanics, modelling and simulation of movement, human movement analysis, and the use of Functional Electrical Stimulation for the restoration of arm function. 

One of my main areas of research currently is the development of real-time models for the simulation of arm function. A musculoskeletal model of the upper limb that can simulate the dynamics of the human arm in real time allows the creation of a realistic 'virtual arm'. This can be used as a replacement for the real arm in the development and testing of advanced neural prosthesis systems for the restoration of function in conditions such as high-level spinal cord injury. This allows rapid development and extensive testing of complex devices whilst reducing the burden on human participants. See 'Publications' for more information.

Alongside the development of assistive technologies, I am interested in understanding more about the normal and pathological function of the upper limb musculoskeletal system, and the shoulder in particular. As such, part of my work also attempts to apply the modelling and simulation tools that we develop to understanding more about shoulder function and stability, both in terms of the glenohumeral joint and control of the scapula. We are currently undertaking work to quantify the stability of the glenohumeral joint in post-traumatic injury and following stroke.

My previous research has included: modelling of the shoulder, elbow and wrist for the estimation of muscle and joint loading during daily tasks; computer-assisted surgical planning; analysis of shoulder arthroplasty; modelling of scapular neck fracture; function of the rotator cuff; tendon transfer in rotator cuff pathology; development of strain-gauged force transducers; and the biomechanics of knife stab attacks.

Funded Projects

  • 2015–20 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Intracortical control of FES-restored arm and hand function in people with SCI, subcontract with Case Western Reserve University.
  • 2015–18 Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Enabling Technologies for Sensory Feedback in Next-Generation Assistive Devices, Co-Investigator, collaboration with Newcastle (lead), Leeds, Essex, Southampton and Imperial College.
  • 2014–17 Iraqi Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, Image-based estimation of musculoskeletal parameters for patient-specific modelling, PhD studentship.
  • 2014–16 Guy Hilton Asthma Trust, Validation of Structured Light Plethysmography in Acute Viral Bronchiolitis, Principal Investigator, collaboration with University Hospitals of North Midlands.
  • 2013–15 Pneumacare Ltd, Validation of Structured Light Plethysmography: Pre/Post Bronchodilation Challenge, Principal Investigator, collaboration with University Hospitals of North Midlands.
  • 2012–15 National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIH), Software development for musculoskeletal simulations, subcontract with Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago.
  • 2013–14 Keele University MRC Centenary Funding, Continuous control of advanced myoelectric prostheses, Project development grant, Bridging the Gaps Scheme.
  • 2006–8 Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center, Prosthetic arm control device for amputees, Co-investigator.
  • 2005–8 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Controller development for upper limb movement, Co-investigator.
  • 2005–8 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NIH), Restoration of Hand and Arm Function by Functional Electrical Stimulation, Coinvestigator.

For further details of current projects, see my Research Gate profile.

Selected Publications

  • Blana D, Chadwick EK, van den Bogert AJ, Murray WM. 2017. Real-time simulation of hand motion for prosthesis control. Computer methods in biomechanics and biomedical engineering, vol. 20(5), 540-549. doi>
  • Blana D, Kyriacou T, Lambrecht JM, Chadwick EK. 2016. Feasibility of using combined EMG and kinematic signals for prosthesis control: A simulation study using a virtual reality environment. J Electromyogr Kinesiol, vol. 29, 21-27. link> doi>
  • Chadwick EK, Blana D, Kirsch RF, van den Bogert AJ. 2014. Real-time simulation of three-dimensional shoulder girdle and arm dynamics. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, vol. 61(7), 1947-1956. link> doi>
  • Cutti AG and Chadwick EK. 2014. Shoulder biomechanics and the success of translational research. Med Biol Eng Comput, vol. 52(3), 205-210. link> doi>
  • Bolsterlee B, Veeger DHEJ, Chadwick EK. 2013. Clinical applications of musculoskeletal modelling for the shoulder and upper limb. Med Biol Eng Comput, vol. 51(9), 953-963. link> doi>

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Hmeidi H, Motamedi-Fakhr S, Chadwick E, Gilchrist FJ, Lenney W, Iles R, Wilson RC, Alexander J. 2017. Tidal breathing parameters measured using structured light plethysmography in healthy children and those with asthma before and after bronchodilator. Physiol Rep, vol. 5(5). link> doi>
  • Blana D, Chadwick EK, van den Bogert AJ, Murray WM. 2017. Real-time simulation of hand motion for prosthesis control. Computer methods in biomechanics and biomedical engineering, vol. 20(5), 540-549. doi>
  • Blana D, Kyriacou T, Lambrecht JM, Chadwick EK. 2016. Feasibility of using combined EMG and kinematic signals for prosthesis control: A simulation study using a virtual reality environment. J Electromyogr Kinesiol, vol. 29, 21-27. link> doi>
  • Chadwick EK, Blana D, Kirsch RF, van den Bogert AJ. 2014. Real-time simulation of three-dimensional shoulder girdle and arm dynamics. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, vol. 61(7), 1947-1956. link> doi>
  • Cutti AG and Chadwick EK. 2014. Shoulder biomechanics and the success of translational research. Med Biol Eng Comput, vol. 52(3), 205-210. link> doi>
  • Bolsterlee B, Veeger DHEJ, Chadwick EK. 2013. Clinical applications of musculoskeletal modelling for the shoulder and upper limb. Med Biol Eng Comput, vol. 51(9), 953-963. link> doi>
  • Marchi J, Blana D, Chadwick EK. 2014. Glenohumeral stability during a hand-positioning task in previously injured shoulders. Med Biol Eng Comput, vol. 52(3), 251-256. link> doi>
  • Blana D, Hincapie JG, Chadwick EK, Kirsch RF. 2013. Selection of muscle and nerve-cuff electrodes for neuroprostheses using customizable musculoskeletal model. J Rehabil Res Dev, vol. 50(3), 395-408. link> doi>
  • Nikooyan AA, Veeger HEJ, Chadwick EKJ, Praagman M, Helm FCTVD. 2011. Development of a comprehensive musculoskeletal model of the shoulder and elbow. Med Biol Eng Comput, vol. 49(12), 1425-1435. link> doi>
  • Chadwick EK, Blana D, Simeral JD, Lambrecht J, Kim SP, Cornwell AS, Taylor DM, Hochberg LR, Donoghue JP, Kirsch RF. 2011. Continuous neuronal ensemble control of simulated arm reaching by a human with tetraplegia. J Neural Eng, vol. 8(3), 034003. link> doi>
  • Praagman M, Chadwick EKJ, van der Helm FCT, Veeger HEJ. 2010. The effect of elbow angle and external moment on load sharing of elbow muscles. J Electromyogr Kinesiol, vol. 20(5), 912-922. link> doi>
  • Blana D, Kirsch RF, Chadwick EK. 2009. Combined feedforward and feedback control of a redundant, nonlinear, dynamic musculoskeletal system. Med Biol Eng Comput, vol. 47(5), 533-542. link> doi>
  • Chadwick EK, Blana D, van den Bogert AJT, Kirsch RF. 2009. A real-time, 3-D musculoskeletal model for dynamic simulation of arm movements. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, vol. 56(4), 941-948. link> doi>
  • Hincapie JG, Blana D, Chadwick EK, Kirsch RF. 2008. Musculoskeletal model-guided, customizable selection of shoulder and elbow muscles for a C5 SCI neuroprosthesis. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng, vol. 16(3), 255-263. link> doi>
  • Blana D, Hincapie JG, Chadwick EK, Kirsch RF. 2008. A musculoskeletal model of the upper extremity for use in the development of neuroprosthetic systems. J Biomech, vol. 41(8), 1714-1721. link> doi>
  • Gatti CJ, Dickerson CR, Chadwick EK, Mell AG, Hughes RE. 2007. Comparison of model-predicted and measured moment arms for the rotator cuff muscles. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon), vol. 22(6), 639-644. link> doi>
  • Veeger HEJ, Magermans DJ, Nagels J, Chadwick EKJ, van der Helm FCT. 2006. A kinematical analysis of the shoulder after arthroplasty during a hair combing task. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon), vol. 21 Suppl 1, S39-S44. link> doi>
  • van Drongelen S, van der Woude LHV, Janssen TWJ, Angenot ELD, Chadwick EKJ, Veeger HEJ. 2006. Glenohumeral joint loading in tetraplegia during weight relief lifting: a simulation study. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon), vol. 21(2), 128-137. link> doi>
  • Praagman M, Chadwick EKJ, van der Helm FCT, Veeger HEJ. 2006. The relationship between two different mechanical cost functions and muscle oxygen consumption. J Biomech, vol. 39(4), 758-765. link> doi>
  • Magermans DJ, Chadwick EKJ, Veeger HEJ, van der Helm FCT. 2005. Requirements for upper extremity motions during activities of daily living. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon), vol. 20(6), 591-599. link> doi>
  • Van Drongelen S, Van der Woude LH, Janssen TW, Angenot EL, Chadwick EK, Veeger DH. 2005. Mechanical load on the upper extremity during wheelchair activities. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, vol. 86(6), 1214-1220. link> doi>
  • van Drongelen S, van der Woude LH, Janssen TW, Angenot EL, Chadwick EK, Veeger DH. 2005. Glenohumeral contact forces and muscle forces evaluated in wheelchair-related activities of daily living in able-bodied subjects versus subjects with paraplegia and tetraplegia. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, vol. 86(7), 1434-1440. link> doi>
  • Chadwick EKJ, van Noort A, van der Helm FCT. 2004. Biomechanical analysis of scapular neck malunion--a simulation study. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon), vol. 19(9), 906-912. link> doi>
  • Walker CA, Gray TGF, Nicol AC, Chadwick EKJ. 2004. Evaluation of test regimes for stab-resistant body armour. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS PART L-JOURNAL OF MATERIALS-DESIGN AND APPLICATIONS, vol. 218(L4), 355-361. link> doi>
  • Magermans DJ, Chadwick EKJ, Veeger HEJ, van der Helm FCT, Rozing PM. 2004. Biomechanical analysis of tendon transfers for massive rotator cuff tears. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon), vol. 19(4), 350-357. link> doi>
  • Magermans DJ, Chadwick EKJ, Veeger HEJ, Rozing PM, van der Helm FCT. 2004. Effectiveness of tendon transfers for massive rotator cuff tears: a simulation study. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon), vol. 19(2), 116-122. link> doi>
  • Veeger HEJ, van der Helm FCT, Chadwick EKJ, Magermans D. 2003. Toward standardized procedures for recording and describing 3-D shoulder movements. Behav Res Methods Instrum Comput, vol. 35(3), 440-446. link> doi>
  • Magermans DJ, Smits NCMA, Chadwick EKJ, Veeger D, van der Helm FCT, Rozing PM. 2003. Discriminating factors for functional outcome after shoulder arthroplasty. A critical review of the literature. Acta Orthop Belg, vol. 69(2), 127-136. link>
  • Praagman M, Veeger HEJ, Chadwick EKJ, Colier WNJM, van der Helm FCT. 2003. Muscle oxygen consumption, determined by NIRS, in relation to external force and EMG. J Biomech, vol. 36(7), 905-912. link> doi>
  • Chadwick EK and Nicol AC. 2001. A novel force transducer for the measurement of grip force. J Biomech, vol. 34(1), 125-128. link> doi>
  • Chadwick EK, Nicol AC, Floyd S, Gray TG. 2000. A telemetry-based device to determine the force-displacement behaviour of materials in high impact loading situations. J Biomech, vol. 33(3), 361-365. link> doi>
  • Chadwick EK and Nicol AC. 2000. Elbow and wrist joint contact forces during occupational pick and place activities. J Biomech, vol. 33(5), 591-600. link> doi>
  • Chadwick EK, Nicol AC, Lane JV, Gray TG. 1999. Biomechanics of knife stab attacks. Forensic Sci Int, vol. 105(1), 35-44. link> doi>

Other

  • Jabbar SI, Day CR, Heinz N, Chadwick EK, IEEE. 2016. Using Convolutional Neural Network for Edge Detection in Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Images. 2016 INTERNATIONAL JOINT CONFERENCE ON NEURAL NETWORKS (IJCNN) (pp. 4619-4626). link> doi>
  • Magermans DJ, Smits NCMA, Chadwick EKJ, Veeger DJ, van der Helm FCT. 2001. Functional evaluation of the shoulder. PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SHOULDER GROUP (pp. 101-103). link>
  • Chadwick EKJ, van Noort A, van der Helm FCT, Slaa RLT, Marti RK, van der Werken C. 2001. Modelling shoulder function and strength after scapular neck fracture. PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SHOULDER GROUP (pp. 29-32). link>
  • Chadwick EK. 1999. Biomechanics of the upper limb: Applications of motion analysis and force measurement techniques.

My teaching activity takes place on the MSc courses in Biomedical Engineering (BME) and Cell & Tissue Engineering. I am currently the Course Director for the Biomedical Engineering MSc, and teach on the following modules:

  • MTE-40029 Medical Equipment and Technology Services Management (Module Co-ordinator)
  • MTE-40038 Medical Device Design Principles (Module Co-ordinator)
  • MTE-30003 Engineering for Medical Applications (Module Co-ordinator)
  • MTE-40026 Physiological Measurement (Contributor)
  • MTE-40015 Dissertation Project (Module Co-ordinator, Supervisor)

I previously taught Biomechanics at Undergraduate level, and am a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, following completion of the Post-Graduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education at Aberystwyth University.

I welcome enquiries from students wishing to undertake PhD or MPhil postgraduate studies. My research interests are described under the "Research and Scholarship" tab, and my latest papers can be seen under the "Publications" tab.

Potential projects could involve:

  • using existing computer models, physiological measurement or motion analysis to investigate the mechanisms of movement disorders;
  • designing or testing treatments for a disorder or population that has been under-investigated previously;
  • improving on existing methods of measurement and modelling that will inform clinical practice.

This type of project would be suitable for students with biomedical engineering, biomechanics or human movement science backgrounds.

Our rehabilitation research group comprises engineers, scientists and clinicians, and we have state-of-the-art human movement laboratories. Our students have a range of backgrounds, such as rehabilitation engineering, computer science and physiotherapy, and come both from the UK and overseas. We have a student lab meeting once a week, which promotes peer collaboration and support, and ensures regular contact with the supervisory team.

Please email me directly to discuss potential projects.