Alison Aries

Title: NIHR Clinical Doctoral Research Fellow
Phone: 01782 734418
Email: a.m.aries@keele.ac.uk
Location: MAC - 1.15
Role:
Contacting me: Via Email
Aries Alison

Having qualified from Wolverhampton School of Physiotherapy in 1986 I worked within the NHS for over 25 years, finally leaving my last permanent NHS post in September 2012. Gaining a broad background of experience, I successfully undertook senior posts in many different specialities, including two years in general medicine / elderly care, six years within the field of surgery / ITU and three years in neurology, prior to moving into the community to work, specialising in stroke.  Over the last decade, as a senior physiotherapist within the Community Intermediate Care Team, I have developed my specialist skills in neurological rehabilitation, managed a clinical team, and I also played a key role in the development of the Stroke Early Supported Discharge (ESD) service in Wolverhampton.

My research interests lie predominantly in neurology, in particular neuroplasticity and rehabilitation of stroke patients. I have recently secured a prestigious National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) full time Clinical Academic Doctoral Fellowship to explore somatosensory stimulation to the foot post stroke and I am looking forward to commencing this work in April 2015. The three year full-time fellowship will provide opportunities to further develop my clinical and leadership skills and to undertake research. This work will involve development of protocols for sensory stimulation to the lower limb post stroke. One technique, Mobilisation and Tactile Stimulation (MTS) will prime the sensorimotor system for activity and another (textured insoles) will augment the system during functional activities. Efficacy of these two interventions will subsequently be explored in a randomised controlled feasibility study, involving a mixed methods design with both quantitative and qualitative components (focus groups and daily diaries).

In preparation for this fellowship I have gained invaluable research experience working as a blinded assessor for the FAST INdiCATE trial: “Clinical efficacy of functional strength training for upper limb motor recovery early after stroke: neural correlates and prognostic indicators”. This multi-centre, randomised, controlled, observer blind trial is funded by the NIHR/MRC Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation (EME) programme, and is sponsored by University of East Anglia, Norwich.

Selected Publications

  • Aries A, Pomeroy V, Hunter SM. 2017. Developing physical therapy protocols for the lower limb post stroke utilising a modified Nominal Group Technique (mNGT). International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, vol. 24(4), 164-165.
  • Aries A and Hunter SM. 2016. Characterising physical therapy for the lower limb post stroke: a modified Nominal Group Technique (mNGT). International Journal of Stroke, vol. 11(4(S)), 59.
  • Hunter SM and Aries A. 2014. A vital part of the jig-saw – the value of Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) to inform research. International Journal of Stroke, vol. 9 (suppl 4), 19.
  • Lee N, Aries A, Hunter SM. 2014. The long-term needs of stroke survivors: a systematic review. International Journal of Stroke, vol. 9 (suppl 4), 42.
  • Aries AM and Hunter S. 2014. Optimising rehabilitation potential after stroke: a 24 hour interdisciplinary approach. British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, vol. 10(6). doi> link>

Full Publications List show

Journal Articles

  • Aries A, Pomeroy V, Hunter SM. 2017. Developing physical therapy protocols for the lower limb post stroke utilising a modified Nominal Group Technique (mNGT). International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, vol. 24(4), 164-165.
  • Aries A and Hunter SM. 2016. Characterising physical therapy for the lower limb post stroke: a modified Nominal Group Technique (mNGT). International Journal of Stroke, vol. 11(4(S)), 59.
  • Hunter SM and Aries A. 2014. A vital part of the jig-saw – the value of Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) to inform research. International Journal of Stroke, vol. 9 (suppl 4), 19.
  • Lee N, Aries A, Hunter SM. 2014. The long-term needs of stroke survivors: a systematic review. International Journal of Stroke, vol. 9 (suppl 4), 42.
  • Aries AM and Hunter S. 2014. Optimising rehabilitation potential after stroke: a 24 hour interdisciplinary approach. British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, vol. 10(6). doi> link>
  • Aries AM, Pomeroy VM, Sim J, Hunter SM. Comparison of mobilisation and tactile stimulation versus textured insoles, combined with task-specific gait training, for enhancing lower limb recovery early post stroke: MoTaStim-Foot feasibility study protocol. Pilot and Feasibility Studies.
  • Lancellotti E, Aries AM, Hunter SM. Hippotherapy for children with Cerebral Palsy: a narrative review. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology.

Other

  • Twigg, H and Aries A. A modified systematic review (MSR) of the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in stroke patients. Conference proceedings, Physiotherapy Research Society. Page 22. Available online at http://prs.csp.org.uk/documents/physiotherapy-research-society-conference-cardiff-2013-abstracts.
  • Aries AM and Waterfield J. Exploration of Critical Appraisal Skills in Physiotherapy Staff and their Perception of how this Influences the Implementation of Evidenced-Based Practice. Conference proceedings. Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Congress..
  • Kouzouna A and Aries A. What is the most valid method of assessing neglect / inattention in an adult post stroke? (Right Cerebrovascular accident (CVA), left hemiparesis). A critically appraised topic (CAT). Conference proceedings. Physiotherapy Research Society. Available online at http://prs.csp.org.uk/documents/scientific-meeting-2011-full-programme.

I completed the MSc Neuromusculoskeletal Healthcare at Keele in May 2003; in July 2003 I commenced work part-time as a lecturer within the School of Health and Rehabilitation (SHAR) at Keele University whilst continuing to work as a part-time senior physiotherapist until September 2012.

As a lecturer at Keele I have twelve years of experience teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, mainly within the field of neurology. I have successfully undertaken many roles and responsibilities within SHAR: Programme Lead for the MSc Neurological Rehabilitation; Year Head; Disability Liaison Officer; Deputy Academic Conduct Officer; SHAR representative for the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences User and Carer Liaison Group; member of the admissions team; and module leader at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.