PIR-30147 - Politics of Development
Coordinator: Rebecca Richards Room: CBB2.017 Tel: +44 1782 7 33211
Lecture Time: See Timetable...
Level: Level 6
Credits: 15
Study Hours: 150
School Office:

Programme/Approved Electives for 2019/20

International Relations Combined Honours (Level 6)
International Relations Major (Level 6)
International Relations Minor (Level 6)
International Relations Single Honours (Level 6)
Liberal Arts Single Honours (Level 6)
Liberal Arts Single Honours (Masters) (Level 6)
Politics Combined Honours (Level 6)
Politics Major (Level 6)
Politics Minor (Level 6)
Politics Single Honours (Level 6)


Available as a Free Standing Elective

No

Co-requisites

None

Prerequisites

None.

Barred Combinations

None

Description for 2019/20

The 'developing world' comprises those parts of the world that have experienced the most political, social, and economic upheaval, and which have faced the greatest challenges of the postcolonial world in the areas of poverty, displacement and diaspora, environmental degradation, human and civil rights abuses, war, hunger, and disease. Comprising the geographic regions of Africa, Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, and even some within the United States and Mediterranean Europe, the study of these otherwise disparate and discontinuous geographic areas involves not only practical solutions to pervasive problems of inequality, but also the study of the language of subalterity and the role of agency in socio-political practices. Thus, the study of development covers not only dominant ideological interpretations and policy practices such as aid and economic restructuring, but also involves understanding the politics and political practices surrounding and underpinning those.
Students of this module will investigate the politics of development from political science, international relations (including political economy), development studies, and security perspectives. In particular, this module aims to communicate regional understandings of the less-affluent world, and to review and analyse the growing literature on justice, inequality, sovereignty, environment, development, and security in the developing world. The module demonstrates how to critically evaluate both theoretical and empirical writings which pertain to concepts of a developed-developing dichotomy, and investigates current literature on the central themes of critical geopolitics, and development theory and practice.
It also aims to cultivate the critical skills needed to analyse the impacts of political ideologies, dominant practices, and interconnectedness on majority worlds, enabling students to gain experience of individual research by gathering, organising, and deploying information (from primary and secondary sources), and by identifying, analysing and advocating potential solutions to problems. This will help students to improve their oral and written presentation skills, and to gain experience by both participating in and facilitating group discussion. Students will also learn to communicate about current debates and areas of new research in relation to major, contemporary issues pertaining to the politics of development.

Aims
a. To investigate the politics of development from international relations and political science perspectives;
b. To communicate regional understandings of the developing world;
c. To review and analyse the growing literature on justice, society, sovereignty, environment, politics, and security in the study and practice of development;
d. To critically evaluate both theoretical and empirical writings which pertain to concepts of a developed-developing divide;
e. To investigate current literature on the central dimensions of critical geo-politics;
f. To cultivate the critical skills needed to analyse the impacts of changing political ideologies and dominant practice on majority worlds;
g. To enable students to gain experience of individual research by gathering, organising, and deploying information (from primary and secondary sources), and by identifying, analysing, and advocating potential solutions to problems;
h. To enable students to improve their oral presentation skills and to gain experience of participating in and facilitating group discussion;
i. To communicate current debates and areas of new research in relation to major, contemporary issues pertaining to the politics and practice of development.

Talis Aspire Reading List
Any reading lists will be provided by the start of the course.
http://lists.lib.keele.ac.uk/modules/pir-30147/lists

Intended Learning Outcomes

critically evaluate past and current research looking at the social and political dimensions of key issues in the Third World and the practice of development, and provide an individual and original interpretation of that research: 1,2
persuasively communicate conclusions formed through research and critical analysis in both written and verbal form: 1,2
develop a research proposal culminating in the submission of a formal research plan: 1,2

Study hours

150 hours of student effort in total, as follows:
20 hours: contact time in 10 x 2 hour seminars
40 hours: seminar preparation
50 hours: written work (essay) preparation
40 hours: research plan and video blog presentation preparation

School Rules

None

Description of Module Assessment

1: Essay weighted 60%
3000 word research essay
Students will produce one 3000 word essay on a topic of their own design, related to and relevant for content covered in module.

2: Creative Brief weighted 40%
Video blog presentation
Students will present their essay research topic and findings in a way that is accessible to a non-specialist audience. This will be done as a 4-8 minutes video blog submission.