GEG-30015 - Postcolonialism in South Asia
Coordinator: Lisa E Lau Room: WSF22 Tel: +44 1782 7 33613
Lecture Time: See Timetable...
Level: Level 6
Credits: 15
Study Hours: 150
School Office: 01782 733615

Programme/Approved Electives for 2020/21

None

Available as a Free Standing Elective

No

Co-requisites

None

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this module

Barred Combinations

Not applicable.

Description for 2020/21

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the present-day relevance of postcolonial concepts and workings in Human Geography. It seeks to introduce students to some of the key issues within postcolonial studies and provide them with an assessment of those issues in a geographical context. It will enable students to generate a geographical
framework through which they can deconstruct the power structures of the past and present, deconstructing not only institutional structures, but mental ones as well, and to understand their spatial implications and expressions for landscapes and societies. South Asia will be used as the case study for the module, providing illustrations of the various types and levels of colonial workings, impacts, and geographical outcomes.

Aims
To provide students with an understanding of the present-day relevance of postcolonial concepts and workings in Human Geography. It seeks to introduce students to some of the key issues within postcolonial studies, and provide them with an assessment of those issues in a geographical context. It will enable students to generate a geographical framework through which they can deconstruct the power structures of the past and present, deconstructing not only institutional structures, but mental ones as well, and to understand their spatial implications and expressions for landscapes and societies. South Asia will be used as the case study for the module, providing illustrations of the various types and levels of colonial workings, impacts, and geographical outcomes.

Talis Aspire Reading List
Any reading lists will be provided by the start of the course.
http://lists.lib.keele.ac.uk/modules/geg-30015/lists

Intended Learning Outcomes

demonstrate a systematic understanding, based on detailed knowledge of South Asian case studies, of structures of power, the workings of imperialisms (both past and present), and their geographical expressions in terms of landscapes cultures and societies: 1,2
identify and critically evaluate different theories of power structures and postcolonialism, especially in relation to how these theories explain spatial inequalities in cultural, social and political provision; and to appreciate the textual bases on which these differing theories were developed: 1,2
select and interrogate the relevant literature concerning current debates in postcolonial geographies
: 1,2
prepare and present in written form a reasoned argument evaluating methodologies and differing and contested interpretations of geographies of postcolonialism; and to place these debates in postcolonialism in the context of wider, on-going debates in Human Geography and the Social Sciences: 1,2

Study hours

10 x 1 hour lectures;
10 x 1 hour seminars;
35 hours essay preparation
20 hours seminar preparation
40 hours independent study
35 hours essay plan preparation

School Rules

None

Description of Module Assessment

1: Essay-Plan weighted 60%
Essay Outline, Design, Development
This assignment tests for i) good knowledge of core theories and materials, ii) ability to construct arguments, iii) ability to design and develop an essay, and iv) judicious selection of texts to utilise and include. Choose any 3 of the following 6 titles, and write an essay plan of approximately 800 words for each. Your total word count must not exceed 2500 words. Essay plan guidance: For an 800-word essay plan, divide your word count into the following 3 headings: Introduction ┐ setting out the context and structure of essay: approximately 100 words. Background ┐ via annotated reading list of approximately 300 words. To do an annotated reading list, simply select 3-5 key readings which will help inform your essay; these books/journal articles/sources should contain key/core theory or case studies. Good selection is essential. Outline of Argument and Analysis ┐ briefly set out your planned argument, showing how you will develop the essay in approximately 400 words. No conclusion necessary! It┐s an essay plan, not an essay. Additional guidance: - Focus on the structure of your essay outline. The structure is very important in the making of convincing arguments. - Just one or two core arguments per essay plan is sufficient - State which examples or case studies you plan to include, as illustration of your argument(s). Apply theory the to `real world┐. - Organise your arguments. The ordering of your narrative should show the building up, unfolding, development of a convincing argument. - Your work should not be purely descriptive; you must show your analytical ability.

2: Essay weighted 40%
2000 word essay
This is a standard essay, requiring introduction, body of argument, conclusion, and references.