ENG-10028 - Telling Tales: An Introduction to Narrative Fiction
Coordinator: Nicholas P Bentley Room: CBB2.057 Tel: +44 1782 7 33304
Lecture Time: See Timetable...
Level: Level 4
Credits: 15
Study Hours: 150
School Office: 01782 733147

Programme/Approved Electives for 2019/20

None

Available as a Free Standing Elective

Yes

Co-requisites

None

Prerequisites

None

Barred Combinations

None

Description for 2019/20

Narrative fiction has always been central to our understanding of ourselves and the way we engage with others. The novel in particular has developed over the last four centuries in a number of ways: from producing a critical commentary on the social and political climate of a period, to providing access to the innermost thoughts of an individual. This module will introduce students to the critical study and evaluation of narrative fiction. It will cover a range of authors from different periods and focus on the historical development of fiction from the 'birth' of the novel in the early eighteenth century to the present. It will also identify the formal and aesthetic characteristics of a number of narrative modes such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. Students will also read a range of extracts from literary and narrative theory, which will enhance their understanding of the fiction. Writers covered on the module include Daniel Defoe, George Eliot, Virginia Woolf and Michael Cunningham.
Course Texts (for purchase):
Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders (1722), Norton Critical Edition, ed. Albert J. Rivero (New York: Norton, 2004)
George Eliot, Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe (1861), ed. Terence Cave (Oxford: World Classics, 2008)
Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway (1925), Oxford World Classics, ed. David Bradshaw (Oxford: World Classics, 2008)
Michael Cunningham, The Hours (London: Fourth Estate/Picador, 1998)

Aims
To familiarize students with the distinctive characteristics of narrative fiction.
To enable students to carry out close analysis of a range of fiction by a number of authors from different historical periods.
To equip students with a knowledge of key literary concepts and terminology with respect to narrative fiction.
To provide students with a knowledge of the historical development of narrative fiction from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the present.
To familiarize students with key modes of writing within narrative fiction such as realism, modernism and postmodernism.
To provide students with an awareness of the relationship between socio-historical contexts and literary meaning in narrative fiction.



Intended Learning Outcomes

Identify the distinctive features of a range of narrative modes such as realism, modernism and postmodernism. This will be achieved by assessments: 01, 02, 03
Demonstrate a knowledge of the historical development of narrative fiction. This will be achieved by assessments: 01, 02, 03
Engage in close textual analysis of a range of styles of narrative fiction by different authors in terms of form, meaning and discourse. This will be achieved by assessments: 01, 02
Articulate key concepts in critical and narrative theory and relate these to literary texts. This will be achieved by assessments: 01, 02, 03
Demonstrate an awareness of the relationship between socio-historical contexts and the production of meaning in narrative fiction. This will be achieved by assessments: 01, 02, 03
Show a knowledge of the relationship between the concepts of authors, narrators, characters and readers in narrative fiction. This will be achieved by assessments: 01, 02, 03
Demonstrate a sensitivity to the complexity of literary language and critical discourse. This will be achieved by assessments: 01, 02, 03
Demonstrate an ability to use consistent and accurate bibliographic references in written work. This will be achieved by assessments: 02, 04


Study hours

lectures (10 hours)
small group classes (10 hours)
seminar preparation and private study (75 hours)
essay writing and preparation (44 hours)
formative exercise preparation and writing (10 hours)
essay feedback (1 hour)


School Rules

None

Description of Module Assessment

1: Short Paper weighted 20%
Close reading of an extract of narrative fiction
This formative exercise will ask students to analyse a short passage of fiction with attention to key aspects of narrative theory. The short paper will be 1,200 words in length.

2: Essay weighted 70%
2,000 words. Students choose 1 question from a list of 8
The essay will ask students to examine works of fiction studied on the course bringing in relevant discussion of genre, socio-historical contexts and narrative theory. It will be 2,000 words long.

3: Class Participation weighted 10%
Seminar performance
Participation is assessed on the basis of evidence of preparation in response to set seminar topics, and readiness to apply the preparation positively in class discussion. Tutors will keep weekly records to support marks awarded.

4: Bibilography weighted 0%
An exercise designed to teach, practice and offer feedback on the correct conventions for writing bibliographies
Students will work on a bibliographic exercise in a group session. The exercise will then be peer assessed within the group with feedback provided at the end of the session. The exercise will take place in Week 9 of the programme and will be focused towards the final essay that will be submitted in week 11.