Stafford MP visits malaria research teams at Keele University


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Posted on 11 September 2012
"The UK is a world leader in research into malaria and Keele has an excellent reputation in this field. It's very exciting that we have such key research going on here in Staffordshire and it is my mission to ensure that the fight against malaria remains at the top of the agenda."

Mr Jeremy Lefroy, MP for Stafford and chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases visited Keele University last Friday to find out more about their ground-breaking research into malaria.

During his visit, Mr Lefroy toured the state-of-the-art facilities located in the Centre for Applied Entomology and Parasitology and discussed with the scientists their work within the “Malaria, Mosquitoes and Man” research cluster. Keele University hosts some 25 researchers, several from malaria endemic nations, who integrate their research programmes to explore the biology of the malaria parasite, the manifestation of disease in man and the use of genetically-engineered mosquitoes to block the transmission of parasites.

The MP, who previously lived in Tanzania and has had malaria four times, said: "The UK is a world leader in research into malaria and Keele has an excellent reputation in this field. It's very exciting that we have such key research going on here in Staffordshire and it is my mission to ensure that the fight against malaria remains at the top of the agenda."

A member of the “Malaria, Mosquitoes and Man” research cluster, Dr Paul Horrocks, added: “Mr Lefroy’s visit was an invaluable opportunity to highlight the malaria research being carried out at Keele University to a key UK stakeholder. The malaria research team has had considerable recent success with our research and has secured several prestigious research grants to support our work. Importantly, we were able to discuss our recent links with overseas partners in establishing research and training facilities in West Africa. These partnerships are important for translating our work in the UK to malaria-endemic regions to tackle this devastating disease where it matters.”

MP Jeremy Lefroy   Jeremy Lefroy MP

Dr Catherine Merrick and Dr Paul Horrocks with Mr Jeremy Lefroy MP


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